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Courses

Current offerings:

Intimacy and Asian Migrations

AMST 211,EAST 251, FGSS 204

Professor Nayan Shah                                                                 FALL 2006

Office: Ctr for the Americas 115                                             Hrs: W 9:30-11 am; 4-4:30 p.m. 

 

This seminar explores the history of interracial and intercultural intimacy generated
by the migrations from Asia
in the Americas, from the nineteenth century to the present.
We will focus on social and sexual ties and the political practices and cultural meanings
generated in the convergence of peoples through migration, imperialism,
capitalism and global transformations. We will examine the fears and fascination
with marking racial, ethnic and national difference in intimate relations.  We will explore
the history of interracial marriage and controversies over government legitimacy; the
cultural politics of intraracial or intraethnic reproduction; queer and gender dissident
social ties and cultural spaces; and the perceived dangers and utopian visions that
are harnessed to this tangle of race, gender and sexual identities and practices. 
The assignments, research activities, and class discussion will engage with both
the theoretical and practical work of analyzing research questions, problems and
methods in disciplines that explore the past including history, American studies,
Asian Studies, gender studies, and ethnic studies.  

 

Requirements

 

1) Reading and Preparation:   Students should come to the weekly seminar meeting,
having read all required reading and ready to raise questions and explore conceptual
and research problems that emerge from the reading.  In order to ensure effective
learning, students are required to bring all reading (either books or photocopies of reserve reading) to class, along with their own notes.

 

2) Reading Response Papers:  (4 papers) Each paper should be a 2-3 page typed double-spaced response to the readings assigned for the week. Follow INSTRUCTION SHEET FOR READING RESPONSE PAPERS for guidance on writing the paper.  

        1st response paper:  All students are expected to write a response paper
for Week 2 (September 13)

2nd response paper:  Choose Week 3, 4, or 5 to write a response paper

3rd and 4th  response papers:  Choose 2 times for Weeks 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 & 12
Bring two copies of the paper to class; one to hand in and the other to refer to during class discussion.  The paper is due promptly at the start of the seminar.

        **40% of your grade**

 

2)    Longer Paper: (Friday December 1; 12 noon) A 20 page typed double-spaced interpretive
paper on a topic based additional research combined with course readings and/or historical documents.   There will be a requirement of a paper proposal and selected bibliography due
in class on November 1st.  Details on the proposal requirements and paper requirements will be available in early October.  Oral Presentation to the class will be part of the total grade for
this project.

**50% of your grade**

 

3)    Participation:  Careful reading of all the assigned reading and informed and active
participation in the discussion is crucial for the success of this seminar.  Therefore,
the quality of your class performance is an important element of your overall evaluation.  
**10% of your grade**

 

WHERE DO I GET THE READING?

 

All articles and book excerpts are will be available on Electronic Reserve or through links to
article retrieval services like JSTOR.  Please check with the library reserve webpage for further
details.

Students are expected to print out a copy of this reading and bring your copy to class. 

Required Books are available for purchase at the bookstore.

 

David Eng and Alice Hom, Q&A: Queer in Asian America (Temple University Press, 1998)

Mary Ting Yi Lui, The Chinatown Trunk Mystery: Murder, Miscegenation, and Other Dangerous Encounters in Turn-of-the-Century New York City (Princeton University Press, 2004) 

 Eithne Luibheid, Entry Denied: Controlling Sexuality at the Border (University of Minnesota Press, 2002)

Martin Manalansan, Global Divas:  Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2003

Linda Espana Maram, Creating Masculinity in Los Angeles's Little Manila : Working-Class Filipinos and Popular Culture in the United States (Columbia University Press, 2006)

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Doctor Mom Chung and the Fair-Haired Bastards (University of California Press, 2005)

 

Week 1 Sept 6   Introduction

 

Week 2 Sept 13   Theories of Intimacy, Sexuality, Gender and Asian Americas

Lisa Lowe, “Intimacies on Four continents” Ann Stoler (ed.) Haunted by Empire:  Geographies of Intimacy in North American History (Duke University Press, 2006) pp. 191-212

Ting, Jennifer P. “The Power of Sexuality,” Journal of Asian American Studies 1, no. 1  (1998) 65-82

Jennifer Ting, “Bachelor Society:  Deviant Historiography and Asian American Heterosexuality” Gary Okihiro (ed.) Privileging Positions:  The Site of Asian American Studies (University of Washington Press, 1995), pp. 271-280

Sylvia Yanagisako, “Transforming Orientalism:  Gender, Nationality and Class in Asian American Studies,” in Naturalizing Power, ed. by Sylvia Yanagisako and Carol Delaney (New York:  Routledge, 1995), pp. 275-298.

 

Week 3 Sept 20  Nation-State, Capitalism, Marriage and Freedom 

Eithne Lubheid, Introduction, p. ix-xxvii; Chapter 1 Entry Denied, pp. 1-30; Chapter 2 Blueprint for Exclusion, pp. 31-54; Chapter 3 Birthing a Nation

Nancy Cott, Public Vows (Harvard University Press, 2001) Intro and Chapter 6 p. 1-12; 132-155 + notes

Janet Jakobsen, “Sex +Freedom= Regulation:  Why?” Social Text No 84-85 (Fall 2005)  p. 285-308

 

Week 4 Sept 27  Chinatown Fantasies, Fears and Vulnerable Lives

Wu, Judy Tzu-Chun. “Asian American History and Racialized Compulsory Deviance,” Journal of Women’s History 15, no. 3 (2003): 58-62

Lui, Mary Ting Yi. The Chinatown Trunk Mystery: Murder, Miscegenation, and Other Dangerous Encounters in Turn-of-the-Century New York City. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005)

Nayan Shah, Contagious Divides Chapters 3

 

Recommended:

Jew, Victor. “‘Chinese Demons’: The Violent Articulation of Chinese Otherness and Interracial Sexuality in the U.S. Midwest, 1885-1889,” Journal of Social History 32, no. 2 (2003): 389-410

Joan Wang, “Race, Gender, and Laundry Work:  The Roles of Chinese Laundrymen and American Women in the US, 1850-1950”  Journal of American Ethnic History 24 No 1 (Fall 2004) p. 58-99

John Kuo Tchen, New York before Chinatown (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000)

 

Week 5  Oct 4  Politics of National and Natural Belonging

Leti Volpp, “Divesting Citizenship:  On Asian American History and the Loss of Citizenship
Through Marriage”  UCLA Law Review December 2005 53 UCLA pp 405-483

Devon Carbado, “Racial Naturalization”, American Quarterly (2005) pp. 41-66

Siobhan B. Somerville, “Notes Toward a Queer history of Naturalization”, American (2005) Quarterly pp. 67-84

 

Recommended

Martha Gardner, The Qualities of a Citizen, Women, Immigration and Citizenship, 1870-1965, (Princeton University Press, 2005) Chapter 1

Todd Stevens, “Tender Ties:  Husbands Rights and Racial Exclusion in Chinese Marrigage Cases, 1882-1924”  27 Law and Social Inquiry 271, 300 (2002) 

Cermak, Bonni. “Race, Honor, Citizenship: The Massie Rape/Murder Case,” in Merril D. Smith ed. Sex Without Consent: Rape and Sexual Coercion in America. (New York: New York University Press, 2001)

Rosa, John P. “Local Story: The Massie Case Narrative and the Cultural Production of Local Identity in Hawai’i,” Amerasia Journal 26, no. 2 (2000): 93-115

Pamela Haag, Consent:  Sexual Rights and the Transformation of American Liberalism (Cornell University Press, 1999), Chap 6 “Race Lust in Paradise”…p. 143-176

 


 

Week 7 Oct 18   The Perils of Same-Sex Intimacies

Nayan Shah, “Between Oriental Depravity” and Natural Degenerates”:  Spatial Borderlands and the Making of Ordinary Americans” American Quarterly September 2005, pp. 703-725

Gordon Brent Ingram, “The Uses of Trial Dossiers on Consensual Male Homosexuality for Urban Research, with Examples from Twentieth-Century British Columbia” GLQ: 10.1 (2003) 77-110

 

Recommended:

Peter Boag, Same Sex Affairs, Intro , Chapters 1, 2,3,  pp. 1-124

Samuel R. Delaney, Times Square Red, Times Square Blue

 

Week 8 Oct 25  Commercial Culture and Subcultures

Linda Espana Maram, Creating Masculinity in Los Angeles's Little Manila : Working-Class Filipinos and Popular Culture in the United States (Columbia University Press, 2006), read introduction and focus on Chapters 2-4

 

Recommended:

Cressey, Paul Goalby. The Taxi-Dance Hall: A Sociological Study in the Commercialized Recreation and City Life. (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1932)

McBee, Randy D. Dance Hall Days: Intimacy, Leisure among Working-Class Immigrants in the United States. (New York: New York University Press, 2000)

Mumford, Kevin J. Interzones: black/white sex districts in Chicago and New York in the Early Twentieth Century. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997), Chapter

Rhacel Salazar Parrenas, “White Trash Meets the Little Brown Monkeys”  Amerasia vol 24, no 2 (summer 1998), pp. 115-134

 

Week 9 Nov 1   Regulating Intimate Ties and  Shaping Domesticity

Leti Volpp American Mestizo: Filipinos and Antimiscegenation Laws in California,

        33 UC Davis L. Rev.(2000) p. 795-835

Nayan Shah "Adjudicating Intimacies in U.S. Frontiers" Ann Laura Stoler (ed) Haunted By Empire: Geographies of Intimacy in North American History (Durham:  Duke University Press, 2006)

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Doctor Mom Chung and the Fair-Haired Bastards (University of California Press, 2005), Chapter 1, pp. 9-22, Skim Chapters 2-4, 23-85

 

Recommended

Dara Orenstein, “Void for Vagueness:  Mexicans and the Collapse of Miscegenation Law in California” Pacific Historical Review vol 74, no 3 (August 2005) pp. 367-408

Peggy Pascoe, “Miscegnation Law, Court Cases and Ideologies of Race in 20th Century America”  Journal of American History vol 83, no 1 June 1996 pp. 44-69

Nayan Shah, Contagious Divides, Chapter 4

 

Week 10 Nov 8  Fictive Kinship

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, Doctor Mom Chung and the Fair-Haired Bastards (University of California Press, 2005), Chapters 6-9, pp. 86-154; Chap 11, pp. 170-84

Rachel Lee  Chapter 1“Fraternal Devotions:  Carlos Bulosan and the Sexual Politic of America”  in , pp. 17-43, 156-160

 

Recommended:

Erika Lee, At America’s Gates:  Chinese Immigration During the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943  p. 189-243, 284-292

Daniel Y. Kim, “On the Strange Love of Frank Chin” in Q&A pp. 270-303

 

Week 11 Nov 15 Family Revisions and Social Futures

Karen Leonard,  Making Ethnic Choices (Temple University Press), Chapter 4-6; p. 62-122; Notes, pp. 245-265

Henry Yu, “Tiger Woods Is Not the End of History: or, Why Sex across the Color Line Won’t Save Us All.” The American Historical Review Vol. 108, No. 5, Dec. 2003, pp. 1406-1414.

Arissa Oh, “A New Kind of Missionary Work:  Christians, Christian Americans and the Adoption of Korean GI  Babies, 1955-1961”  Women’s Studies Quarterly 33 no 3-4(2005) p. 161-188.

 

Recommended:

Barbara Posadas, "Mestiza Girlhood:  Interracial Familes in Chicago's Filipino American Community" in Making Waves:  Writings By and About Asian American Women, ed.         Asian Women United, pp. 273-282

Roland B. Tolentino, “Bodies, Letters, Catalogs: Filipinas in Transnational Space.” Social Text 48, Vol. 14, No. 3, Fall 1996. 49-76

Yu, Henry. “Mixing Bodies and Cultures: The Meaning of America’s Fascination with Sex between ‘Orientals’ and ‘Whites’” in Martha Hodes ed. Sex, Love, Race: Crossing Boundaries in North American History. (New York: New York University Press, 1999)

David A. Hollinger, “Amalgamation and Hypodescent: The Question of Ethnoracial Mixture in the History of the United States.” The American Historical Review Vol. 108, No. 5, Dec. 2003, pp. 1363-1390.

 

Week 12 Nov 29  Queer Mobilities and Diasporic Collusions

Martin Manalansan, Global Divas:  Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2003, , Chapters 1, 2, 4, and conclusion, p.21-61, 89-125

David Eng,  “Out Here and Over There: Queerness and Diaspora in Asian American Studies.” Social Text 52/53 (Autumn-Winter 1997): 31-52.

Gayatri Gopinath, Impossible Desires:  Queer Diasporas and South Asian Public Cultures (Duke University Press, 2005),  Intro, p. 1-28; Chapter 6 Nostalgia, Desire, Diaspora, p. 161-186

 

Recommended

Nayan Shah, “Sexuality, Identity, and the Uses of History.” In D. Eng and A. Y. Hom eds. Q & A: queer in Asian America, Temple University Press, 1998.

Jee Yuen Lee, “Toward a Queer American Diasporic History” Q&A, pp. 185-209

 

Week 13 Dec 6  Trauma, Liberal Governmentalities and Reconstitution

Chandan Reddy, “Asian Diaporas, Neoliberalism and Family:  Reviewing the Case for Homosexual Asylum in the Context of Family Rights” in Social Text No 84-85 (Fall 2005)

David L. Eng, Racial Castration (Duke University Press, 2001), pp. 104-136 + 242-249

Jasbir Puar and Amit Rai, “Monster, Terrorist, Fag:  The War on Terrorism and the Production of Docile Patriots”  Social Text no 72 (2002) p. 117-148

 

Recommended

Leti Volpp, “The Citizen and the Terrorist” UCLA Law Review 49 (2002)

Muneer Ahmed, “Homeland Insecurities:  Racial Violence the Day after Steptember 11”  Social Text no 72 (2002) p. 101-115

 

Past offerings:

spring 2006

Diaspora and Transnationalism:Theory & Narrative
AMST 212 SP

 
Crosslistings:EAST 252/LAST 212/HIST 214
 

This seminar is a part of a four-year project supported by the Freeman Asian/Asian American Initiative grant to further develop the study of Asia and the Asian diaspora at Wesleyan University. This seminar will explore the inter-related themes of diaspora and transnationalism in the Asia Pacific. It is now clear that Asian migrants form diasporic networks and engage in transnational practices and relationships that may ebb and flow, but tend to persist over time and space. How migrants make their own transnational histories, and how historians construct diasporic narratives will be examined in depth through newly published case studies that represent the diversity of Asian experiences across the Americas and across the Pacific.

MAJOR READINGS

Azuma, E., BETWEEN TWO EMPIRES: RACE, HISTORY AND TRANSNATIONALISM
Choy, C. C., EMPIRE OF LOVE
Yuh, Ji-Yeon, BEYOND THE SHADOW OF CAMPTOWN
Liu, Haiming, THE TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY OF A CHINESE FAMILY, (Rutgers 2005)

EXAMINATIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Case study research paper, 25-30 pp.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS and/or COMMENTS

Attendance and participation required.

COURSE FORMAT: Seminar

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Level: UGRD    Credit: 1    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS AMST    Grading Mode: Graded   

Prerequisites: NONE

SECTION 01

Instructor(s): Hu-DeHart,Evelyn    

Times: ...W... 01:10PM-04:00PM;     Location: TBA
Reserved Seats:    (Total Limit: 15)

Special Attributes:
Curricular Renewal: Reading Non-Verbal Texts
Permission: Permission of Instructor Required
POI forms will be distributed by the instructor during the browsing period of pre-registration and must be submitted to the Registrar's office prior to the on-line registration appointment

Syllabus:
Prof. Evelyn Hu-DeHart, Freeman Visiting Professor

Office: Center for the Americas
Office Hours: Tuesdays, Noon-6 PM; Wednesdays 9-Noon, and by Appointment by Email: ehudehart@wesleyan.edu and/or Evelyn_HuDeHart@brown.edu

This seminar is part of a four-year project supported by the Freeman Asian/Asian American Initiative to further the study of Asia and the Asian diaspora at Wesleyan University.  As Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos and other Asians migrate across the Pacific to many points in the Americas, they create far-flung co-ethnic communities to form “diaspora,” sustained by “transnational” practices and relationships with the homeland and each other.  We will examine how diaspora and transnationalism are theorized, and focus on how key Asian migrant groups in the Americas make their own transnational histories, and how historians construct diasporic narratives. 

This course originates in the American Studies program, and because of its trans-Pacific and trans-America orientation and coverage, it is crosslisted with East Asian and Latin American Studies.  Furthermore, the approach is largely historical, hence it is also crosslisted with History. 

Meeting Time and Place: 

Wednesdays, 1:10 to 4 PM
Center for the Americas Room 3

Requirements:

Class attendance (you must email me to explain an absence).
Class participation, based on reading and other assignments
Group in-class presentation (see below for details)
Individual in-class presentation (see below for details)
Research Paper, 15-20 pages, due on day of Final Exam (there will be no in-class final)

Required Texts*

E. Azuma.  Between Two Empires.  Race, History, and Transnationalism in Japanese America.  (2005)

M. Hsu.  Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home.  Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943.  (2000)

A. Khan.  Callaloo Nation.  Metaphors of Race and Religious Identity Among South Asians in Trinidad.  (2004)

A. McKeown.  Chinese Migrant Networks and Cultural Change: Peru, Chicago, Hawaii, 1900-1936.  (2001)

R. Parreñas.  Children of Global Migration.  Transnational Families and Gendered Woes. (2005)

L. Siu.  Memories of a Future Home.  Diasporic Citizenship of Chinese in Panama. (2005)

Ji-Yong Yuh.  Beyond the Shadow of Camptown.  Korea Military Brides in America. (2002)

 

*All except Siu are Paperbacks, available at the Wesleyan Bookstore.

Siu is available only in Hardback, but author has made copies available to students in this seminar at paperback prices; you can purchase this from me.

Note on Texts and Readings:

The entire class will read and discuss three of these texts together: Hsu, McKeown and Siu; thus I expect all of you to purchase these books.

While I expect you to also acquire and read the other texts, students in the seminar will be divided into small groups, each responsible to lead discussion on one of the texts.  Students not leading the discussion are still expected to spend some time with the book, so they can follow the lead discussion, pose good questions, and engage the lead discussants in a meaningful dialogue. 

Course Plan, Class Meetings and Reading Assignments

I. Introduction and Orientation.  January 25; Feb. 8 
In Class
:  View documentary “Ancestors in the Americas: Coolies, Sailors, Settlers,” by Asian American filmmaker Loni Ding.

Peruse Prof. Hu-DeHart’s  personal Newspaper File in Diaspora

Reading assignments: handouts on theory of diaspora and transnationalism: Safran, Tololyan, Clifford, Cohen, Basch et al.

Read these short essays and excerpts carefully in preparation for discussion during next class (Feb. 1).  Mark the essays to note the important passages and definitions.  Make a list of key words that appear and recur, starting with Diaspora and Transnationalism.  Here are a few others: Migration, Immigration, Dispersal, Settlement, Displacement, Home, Homeland, Citizenship, Assimilation, Nation-State, Race, Ethnicity.  You will find many more.  Bring this list to Feb. 1 class for discussion.    

For each of the articles, make notes about the key points and main theses, and be sure to bring these notes to class, along with your marked-up copies. 

Make note of where the different authors converge (agree), and where they seem to diverge or disagree. 

II.Constructing the Chinese Diaspora:  Feb. 1, 8 and 15, 22.

February 1 

In class

Discuss the reading assignments from January 25 and your list of key words.
Discuss the newspaper articles you have picked out from Prof. Hu-DeHart’s Diaspora File.

Lecture on Chinese migration throughout the world and to the Americas. 

Reading assignment:  Finish Hsu
Feb. 8.  Constructing the Chinese diaspora narrative:

In Class:

Lecture (continue)
Summary and questions about last week’s discussion.

Discussion: We will begin with M. Hsu’s study of the Taishanese immigrants from South China to the U.S. in the late 19th to early 20th century.  What kind of story does the author want to tell?  What is her central organizing principle for telling this story?   How is “home” constructed in this narrative?   Pay particular attention to the details of the lives of these migrants, with particular attention to family (children and women).   How does Globalization figure into the narrative?  What are the  changes over time in the migrants’ ability and inclination to sustain transnational relationships and practices?   Refer to the readings under Theory, the Cohen charts, and the list of key words.  Break down the book frame by frame (or chapter by chapter).  Make your own list of questions to discuss with the class.  Are there any questions raised but left unanswered by the author?  What are the strengths and weakness of this narrative.    Think back on the documentary we saw on January 25; does it serve as a complementary text to Hsu?  

We will also pay a visit to Prof. Tololyan’s Diaspora Journal archive.   

Reading assignment:  Finish McKeown

February 15:
In class
:

Lecture:  continue overview of the worldwide Chinese diaspora, with particular attention to Latin America.

Summary and questions about last week’s discussion.

Discussion: Class discussion will focus on McKeown.  Go back to the questions above posed re Hsu.  Most also apply to McKeown.  But this book is also different.  How does the author construct a narrative based on comparing three distinct Chinese communities in the Americas?  What kind of institution and practices bind these disparate communities together, and serve as the author’s organizing principle for constructing his narrative?  Do McKeown and Hsu share the same understanding of diaspora and transnationalism, and where might they differ (fundamentally or as a matter of emphasis).   Taken together, do they add up to one, richer narrative than separately? 

Reading assignment
:  Finish Siu

February 22:

In Class:

Lecture

Summary and questions

Discussion: We will discuss Siu on Chinese in Panama and wrap up our in-depth examination of the Chinese diaspora in the Americas.

Unlike Hsu and McKeown, Siu is an anthropologist.  Although she provides a brief history of the Chinese migration to Panama, her narrative is constructed differently.  Note that in the title of the book, there is no time period.  The narrative is not chronological but thematic; the research is not conducted in archives but in the field, with the data collection method primarily ethnographic.  Siu provides a very clear theoretical model to make sense of the Chinese in Panama; so what exactly is “diasporic citizenship”?  How does this narrative work alongside the Hsu and McKeown? 

III. After this close examination of the Chinese diaspora, we break into group projects, each group taking on another Asian diaspora in the Americas based on one study on the reading list and some supplementary reading I will distribute.  Each of these studies presents a distinct narrative on a specific aspect of a particular Asian diaspora.  Each group will make a class presentation and lead a class discussion.  Each topic will be accompanied by a film, which serves as an additional text or narrative.  When we get to this segment of the course, I will provide more guidelines, but the general outline and schedule is as follows:

March 1:  Japanese and nation-state politics

Reading: Azuma

Film: “Gaijin caminhos da libertade,” feature film by Brazilian-Japanese filmmaker Tizuka Yamasaki

March 3 (Friday), 9-11 AM.  Optional assignment:  Freeman Forum, “Novelizing diaspora,” with Karen Tei Yamashita and Marie Lee. 

March 8:  Korean women and war

Reading:  Yuh

Film:  “First Person Plural,” documentary on Korean adoptee returning to Korea, by Deann Borshay Liem (her own journey “home”). 

March 12-26:  Spring Break

March 29:  South Asians and religion

Reading:  Khan

Film: “Roots in the Sand,” documentary on Punjabi farmers in early 20th c. California, by Jayasri Majumdar

April 5:  Class in Library, working on your research project. 

April 12
:  Filipino children of diaspora

Reading:  Parreñas

Film:  “Chain of Love,” documentary of Filipina women migrant workers, by Marije Meerman.

April 14, 9-11 AM.  Optional assignment: Freeman Forum, “The Anthropological gaze:  ethnography and fieldwork on diaspora research,” with Profs. Rhacel Parreñas and Lok Siu, 2 authors whose books we have read. 

April 16 and 26:  In-class presentation of individual research projects

May 3:  Finish individual research presentations.  Summation and Evaluation.    

May 15:  Last day to submit your final paper.

 

Fall 2004

Diaspora and Asian American Experiences   EAST 251 FA/ Crosslistings:AMST 211
Professor Taku Suzuki

This year-long innovative course is part of a four-year project supported by the Freeman Initiative grant to further develop the study of Asia and the Asian diaspora at Wesleyan. Introducing recent theoretical approaches to topics in Asian American history and in understanding Asian American experiences, the course aims at learning about Asian diaspora through classroom study and guided research during the summer.

COURSE FORMAT: Seminar

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Level: UGRD    Credit: 1    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA EAST    Grading Mode: Graded   

Prerequisites: NONE

SECTION 01

This section introduces Asian American history, which focuses on the experience of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry in the United States. Asian Americans today are often portrayed by two extreme images: Either as 'model minority' who are as culturally assimilated and economically successful as, if not more than, the white majority, or as impoverished refugees and illegal immigrants who exploit the US social welfare system. The history of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the past 150 years, however, reveals diversity and complexity of Asian American experiences against the backdrop of the larger context of immigration policies and race relations within the US. By examining historical experiences and contemporary issues surrounding Asian American in the past and present, the course seeks to gain better understanding of not only Asian immigration history and Asian American communities but also the modern US history, economy, and culture in general.

This course, which will survey Asian American history from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, is divided into three parts. The first part of the course will focus on the experiences of the early Asian immigrants of the nineteenth century, such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, and Indian immigrants from the mid-nineteenth century to WW II. The second part will move on to the dramatic transformations of Asian American communities in the postwar era. Asian immigrants in the 1950s, including the so-called war brides from Korea and Japan, as well as the post-1965 wave of Asian immigrants from China/Taiwan, the Philippines, Korea, and India, and refugees from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos (such as Hmong) will be explored. Lastly , we will examine contemporary issues facing Asian Americans today. Topics to be explored include: anti-Asian violence and political activism, media representations, gender relations and domestic problems, and Asian Americans in the post-9-11 era.

The course materials represent a variety of disciplines (history, anthropology, sociology, and literature) and sources (autobiography, internet article, and film) that illuminate complexity and diversity of Asian American experiences. You will be asked to contribute to the class by sharing your own insights and critiques through discussions, essays, and presentations. The course, in other words, is not merely an overview of Asian American history, but also an intellectual exercise to critically engage with our past by use of self-reflexive imagination and expression.

Major Readings

Wu, Jean, and Min Song, eds. 2000. ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES: A READER. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.
Simpson, Caroline Chung. 2001. AN ABSENT PRESENCE: JAPANESE AMERICANS IN POSTWAR AMERICAN CULTURE, 1945-1960. Durham, NC.: Duke University Press.
Murayama, Milton. 1988(1959). ALL I ASKING FOR IS MY BODY. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.
Maira, Sunaina. 2002. DESIS IN THE HOUSE: INDIAN AMERICAN YOUTH CULTURE IN NEW YORK. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
Fadiman, Anne. 1997. THE SPIRIT CATCHES YOU AND YOU FALL DOWN: A HMONG CHILD, HER AMERICAN DOCTORS, AND THE COLLISION OF TWO CULTURES. New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux.
Espiritu, Yen Le. 2003. HOMEBOUND: FILIPINO AMERICAN LIVES ACROSS CULTURES, COMMUNITIES, AND COUNTRIES. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
Park, Kyeyoung. 1997. THE KOREAN AMERICAN DREAM: IMMIGRANTS AND SMALL BUSINESS IN NEW YORK CITY. Ithaca, NY.: Cornell University Press.

Examinations and Assignments

Several class projects and a final research paper.

Additional Requirements and/or Comments

First-year students are excluded from this course.
 

Instructor(s): Suzuki,Taku    

Times: ...W... 01:10PM-04:00PM;     Location: TBA
Reserved Seats:    (Total Limit: 15)

SR. major: 0   Jr. major: 0
SR. non-major: 5   Jr. non-major: 4   SO: 6   FR: X
Special Attributes:
 

SECTION 02
Professor Anita Mannur

This section of the fall course examines how the term "diaspora" has been historically and theoretically constituted with specific reference to its usage within Asian and Asian American Studies. In this semester-long course devoted to situating the study of Asian America within a global perspective, we will take up the problem of examining what it means to think, and feel beyond "Asian America." Reading an array of wide-ranging materials, in relation to Asian diasporas (South Asian, East Asian), this course examines the place of the United States, and "America" in a larger global framework paying close attention to the ways in which Asia haunts the American imagination and conversely, how "Asian America" is imagined in "Asian" cultural production . The course will follow the basic format of pairing one critical work with one film, novel, play or cultural text in its exploration of how diaspora is an important analytic and critical tool for understanding recent trajectories within Asian American Studies--intellectual, political, and cultural.

Major Readings

MODERNITY AT LARGE: THE CULTURAL DIMENSIONS OF GLOBALIZATION Arjun Appadurai
FLEXIBLE CITIZENSHIP: THE CULTURAL LOGICS OF TRANSNATIONALITY Aihwa Ong
THEORIZING DIASPORA Eds. Anita Mannur and Jane Evans Braziel
GLOBAL DIVAS: FILIPINO GAY MEN IN THE DIASPORA Martin F. Manalansan IV
DESIS IN THE HOUSE: INDIAN AMERICAN YOUTH CULTURE IN NEW YORK CITY Sunaina Maira
THE BOOK OF SALT Monique Truong
FUNNY BOY Shyam Selvadurai
 

Examinations and Assignments

Several class projects and a final research paper.
Instructor(s): Mannur,Anita H.   

Times: .M..... 01:10PM-04:00PM;     Location: TBA

Reserved Seats:    (Total Limit: 15)

SR. major: 0   Jr. major: 0
SR. non-major: 5   Jr. non-major: 4   SO: 6   FR: X

Special Attributes:

Curricular Renewal:    Reading Non-Verbal Texts, Writing

Spring 2005

Asian Diaspora in the Americas/AMST 212 SP/Crosslistings: EAST 252/ALIT205/ENG299
This year-long innovative course is a part of a four-year project supported by the Freeman Asian/Asian American Initiative grant to further develop the study of Asian and the Asian diaspora at Wesleyan University.

COURSE FORMAT: Seminar

     

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Level: UGRD    Credit: 1    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS AMST    Grading Mode: Graded   

Prerequisites: NONE

 

SECTION 01

This section explores Korean and Korean diaspora through history, literature, and film. In the fist part of the course, which is about Korea, Korea's literary and historical modernizations will be reviewed, after which a more in-depth exploration of recent Korean literature and film will begin. During this first part of the course, the North/South split and its psychological and artistic effects will be highlighted. We will also analyze developments in Korean cinema, particularly the new prominence of Korean film beginning in the 1990s. In the second part of the course, which centers on Korean diaspora, we will take up materials originally written in English. We will compare and contrast these with materials from the first part of the course, originally written in Korean. Throughout, we will ask how the issue of Korea and its tensions and successes figures on the Korean-American scene.

Major Readings

Kim and Fulton, tr., A READY-MADE LIFE
Pihl, Fulton, and Fulton, LAND OF EXILE: CONTEMPORARY KOREAN FICTION
Suh, tr., BROTHER ENEMY. POEMS OF THE KOREAN WAR
Fulton and Fulton, tr., WAYFARER: NEW FICTION BY KOREAN WOMEN
Chang-rae Lee, NATIVE SPEAKER
Chang-rae Lee, ALOFT
Susan Choi, THE FOREIGN STUDENT
Susan Choi, AMERICAN WOMAN: A NOVEL
Patti Kim, A CAB CALLED RELIABLE
Caroline Hwang, IN FULL BLOOM
Helie Lee, ABSENCE IN THE SUN
Hyangjin Lee, CONTEMPORARY KOREAN CINEMA
Cha and Kang, NUCLEAR NORTH KOREA: A DEBATE ON ENGAGEMENT STRATEGIES
Bruce Cumings, KOREA'S PLACE IN THE SUN, A MODERN HISTORY

Films:
JOINT SECURITY AREA
SHIRI

Examinations and Assignments
Three short (3-5 pp.) papers
One final paper, 8-10 pp.
Additional Requirements and/or Comments
Class participation
One or two additional movie screenings may be required.


 

Instructor(s): Widmer,Ellen B.   
Times: ..T.R.. 02:40PM-04:00PM;     Location: TBA
 
Reserved Seats:    (Total Limit: 15)
Special Attributes:
Curricular Renewal:    Reading Non-Verbal Texts

 

SECTION 02

How do we make sense of Asian American culture as a coalition of differences and contradictions? This seminar will survey and read closely recent scholarship on Asian American culture. This class will interrogate how these works theorize the textual, cultural and political coalition called Asian America and its connections with other communities of color. We will apply these theories to literary and filmic texts by and about Asian Americans. Moreover, we will ask how such theories help us re-conceptualize difference, nationhood, citizenship and coalition.

Major Readings

Texts will include:
Lowe, IMMIGRANT ACTS
Okihiro, MARGINS AND MAINSTREAMS
Espirtitu, ASIAN AMERICAN PANETHNICITY
Palumbo-Liu, ASIAN AMERICA
Prashad, EVERYBODY WAS KUNG-FU FIGHTING: AFRO-ASIAN CONNECTIONS AND THE MYTH OF CULTURAL PURITY
 

Examinations and Assignments

Students will submit weekly inquiry papers on the assigned reading(s). Each student will present an aspect of the class session's reading assignment, distributing a 4-6 page written version and set of questions to other students. Grades will be based on a 15 page final project, inquiry papers, presentations and active listening and participation in class discussion.

 
Additional Requirements and/or Comments

Students who have taken Asian Am. Lit, Multi-Ethnic Literature or Introduction to Ethnic Studies will have priority. This course meets the English department's theory requirement.


 

Instructor(s): Isaac,Allan Punzalan   
Times: ...W... 07:00PM-09:50PM;     Location: TBA
 
Reserved Seats:    (Total Limit: 15)
 

Special Attributes:
Curricular Renewal:    Reading Non-Verbal Texts, Speaking

Fall 2002

Diaspora and Asian American Experiences
Professor Su Zheng

students from the diaspora classThis year-long course is a part of a four-year project to develop the study of Asia and the Asian diaspora at Wesleyan. Introducing recent theoretical approaches to topics in Asian American History and in understanding Asian American experiences, the course aims at learning about Asian diaspora through classroom study and guided research during the summer in Asian or the United States.

The fall course will introduce the historical background of Asians in the United States, examine the impact of diaspora on Asian American experiences, and discuss topics in Asian American cultural representations. Students are expected to explore the possibilities of community-based research projects, and will complete a pilot research project. Classes will be devoted to discussions of both readings and issue encountered in the research projects. The Spring seminar is designed to introduce students to the major themes of Chinese American history through the reading of selected primary sources, some of the major works in the field, and recent interpretations of the Chinese experiences in the United States.

At the end of the year-long course, students will participate in summer research on Asian American topics in carefully chosen sites in America or Asia, depending on the student's major field, research interests and personal goals. Students will receive support for travel, housing, and expenses, as well as a stipend.

Major Readings

Buell, Frederick, National Culture and the New Global System
Chan, Sucheng, Asian Americans: An Interpretive History
Hammamoto, Darrell, Monitored Peril: Asian Americans and the Politics of TV Representation
Lee, Lisa, Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics
Ma, Sheng-mei, Immigrant Subjectivities in Asian American and Asian Diaspora Literatures (1998)
Ong, Aihwa, Flexible Citizenship: The Cultural Logics of Transnationality (1999)
Xing, Jun, Asian American through the Lens: History, Representations, and Identity (1998)
 

Materials on-line
www.wesleyan.edu/libr/reserve.htm

 

Spring 2003

The Chinese American Experience
Professor K. Scott Wong
 

Course Description:

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the major themes of Chinese American history through the reading of selected primary sources, some of the major works in the field, and recent interpretations of the Chinese experience in the United States. During the course of the semester we will be reading works on Chinese immigration, labor, the anti-Chinese movement, the Chinese response to exclusion, gender and sexuality, community dynamics, the notion of "overseas Chinese" and literary expressions of the Chinese American Experience.

Major Readings

Chin, Ko-lin, Smuggled Chinese: Clandestine Immigration to the United States (1999)
Chin, Tung Pok, Paper Son: One Man's Story (2000)
Choy, Dong, & Hom, The Coming Man: 19th Century American Perceptions of the Chinese (1994)
Chu, Louis, Eat a Bowl of Tea (1961)
Khu, ed., Josephine M.T., Cultural Curiosity: Thirteen Stories About the Search for Chinese Roots (2001)
Ma, Sheng-Mei, The Death Embrace: Orientalism and Asian American Identity (2000)
Ng,Fae, Bone (1993)
Peffer, George Anthony, It They Don't Bring Their Women Here: Chinese Female Immigration Before Exclusion (1999)
Tchen, John Kuo Wei, New York Before Chinatown: Orientalism and the Shaping of American Culture, 1776-1882 (1999)
Wong, K. Scott and Chan, Sucheng, eds. Claiming America: Constructing Chinese American Identities during the Exclusion Era (1998)

Materials on-line
www.wesleyan.edu/libr/reserve.htm

 

Fall 2003

Diaspora and Asian American Experiences
Professor Su Zheng

Required Sequence: EAST251/AMST211 and EAST252/AMST212

This year-long innovative course is part of a four-year project supported by the Freeman Initiative grant to further develop the study of Asia and the Asian diaspora at Wesleyan. Introducing recent theoretical approaches to topics in Asian American history and in understanding Asian American experiences, the course aims at learning about Asian diaspora through classroom study and guided research during the summer.

The fall course will introduce the historical background of Asians in the United States, examine the impact of diaspora on Asian American experiences, and discuss topics in Asian American cultural representations. Students are expected to explore the possibilities of community-based research projects, and will complete a pilot research project. Classes will be devoted to discussions of both readings and issues encountered in the research projects. The spring seminar is designed to introduce students to the major themes of Chinese American history through the reading of selected primary sources, some of the major works in the field, and recent interpretations of the Chinese experience in the United States.

At the end of the year-long course, students will participate in summer research in carefully chosen sites in America or Asia, depending on the student's major field, research interests and personal goals. Students will receive support for travel, housing, and expenses, as well as a stipend.

MAJOR READINGS

Karin Aguilar-San Juan, THE STATE OF ASIAN AMERICA: ACTIVISM AND RESISTANCE IN THE 1990s
Sucheng Chan, ASIAN AMERICANS: AN INTERPRETIVE HISTORY
Juanita Tamayo Lott, ASIAN AMERICANS: FROM RACIAL CATEGORY TO MULTIPLE IDENTITIES
Lisa Lowe, IMMIGRANT ACTS: ON ASIAN AMERICAN CULTURAL POLITICS
William Wei, THE ASIAN AMERICAN MOVEMENT
Henry Yu, THINKING ORIENTALS: MIGRATION, CONTACT, AND EXOTICISM IN MODERN AMERICA
Min Zhou and James V. Gatewood, eds. CONTEMPORARY ASIAN AMERICA: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY READER
Fred Ho with Carolyn Antonio, Diane Fujino, and Steve Yip, eds. LEGACY TO LIBERATION: POLITICS AND CULTURE OF REVOLUTIONARY ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICA
Jun Xing, ASIAN AMERICA THROUGH THE LENS
Josephine Lee, PERFORMING ASIAN AM ERICA: RACE AND ETHNICITY ON THE CONTEMPORARY STAGE
David Leiwei Li, IMAGINING THE NATION: ASIAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURAL CONSENT
Helen Zia, ASIAN AMERICAN DREAMS: THE EMERGENCE OF AN AMERICAN PEOPLE
Frank Wu, YELLOW: RACE IN AMERICA BEY OND BLACK AND WHITE

EXAMINATIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Several class projects and a final research paper.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS and/or COMMENTS

First-year students are excluded from this course.

COURSE FORMAT: Seminar
REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Level:
UGRD    Credit: 1    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA EAST    Grading Mode: Graded    Prerequisites: NONE

SECTION 01

Instructor(s): Zheng,Su    

Times: ...W... 06:30PM-09:20PM;     Location: EAST LIB.
Reserved Seats:    (Total Limit: 15)
SR. major: 0   Jr. major: 0
SR. non-major: 5   Jr. non-major: 4   SO: 6   FR: 0

Spring 2004

Asian Disaspora in the Americas
Professor Taku Suzuki

Course Description:

Paul Gilroy argued that the culture that peoples of African descent in Europe and the Americas share is the 'Black Atlantic' culture; not specifically African, European, North American, Caribbean, South American or 'African,' but all of these at the same time, based on stereophonic, bilingual, or bifocal cultural forms. Peoples of Asian descent also have established their lives, after crossing another ocean, the Pacific, in North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America. Echoing Gilroy, this course will ask the following questions: Is there such a culture and experience that can be called, say 'Yellow Pacific'?  We may also ask. perhaps more importantly, what is the significance of having such a scope for diverse experiences of Asians in the Americas and the Caribbean?  As the second half of the year-long course on Asian Diaspora, this course will compliment the last semester's "Diaspora and Asian American Experiences" by exploring Asian immigrants' experiences across the Central and South America and the Caribbean, and examining how their cultures and experiences have been shaped within particular socio-economic, political, gender, and racial/ethnic conditions of nation-states.

The course will first overview the modern history of Latin America and concepts of race and ethnicity that are differently configured than within modern North America.  Then it will proceed to historical and ethnographic studies of Asian immigrant communities in the Central and South America and the Caribbean. Cross-national (Chinese in Panama vs. Peru, for instance) and cross-ethnic comparisons of Asian groups (South Asians and Chinese in Trinidad and Tobago, for instance) will be made in order to provide a broader perspective.  The course will use academic as well as non-academic sources (films, novels) for our inquiries into the experiences of Asians with various backgrounds and social conditions.  Drawing upon the theoretical approaches to Asian diaspora that you explored in the last semester, we will return to the questions of 'diaspora' and 'Yellow Pacific' culture and identity, and discuss the significance of studying Asian immigrants' (and their descendants') experiences, cultures, and identities across the nation-state boundaries.

As this course concludes the end of the year-long course which require you to develop your own research project, you are also expected to learn research design and methods through this course. Students are required to submit the IRB (Institutional Review Board) for your research by April, the course will devote substantial amount of time for developing individual research  projects in the first half.  Be prepared to be pressured quickly conceive and develop your project with fairly detailed logistical plans in the first 5-6 weeks.

Major Readings:

Booth, Wayne C., and et al. The Craft of Research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press
Lesser, Jeffrey. 1999. Negotiating National Identity: Immigrants, Minorities, and the Struggle for Ethnicity in Brazil. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press
Lesser, Jeffrey. ed. 2003. Searching for Home Abroad: Japanese Brazilians and Transnationalism. Durham, N.C. Duke University Press

For the Fiction Paper:

Garcia, Cristina. 2003 Monkey Hunting. New York: Knopf
Naipaul, V.S. 2001 A House for Mr. Biswas. New York: Vintage
Yamashita, Karen Tei. 1992 Brazil-Maru: A Novel. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press
Yamashita, Karen Tei. 2001. Circle K Cycles. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press