Wesleyan portrait of Frederick M. Cohan

Frederick M. Cohan

Professor of Biology

Shanklin Laboratory, 207
860-685-3482

Professor, Environmental Studies

860-685-3482

Professor, Integrative Sciences

fcohan@wesleyan.edu

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BS Stanford University
PHD Harvard University

Frederick M. Cohan

Frederick Cohan studies the origins of diversity in bacteria. He is intrigued by what is the same and different about species and speciation across all walks of life, and has investigated how the unique combination of enormous population size and rare but promiscuous genetic exchange in bacteria affect bacterial speciation and diversity. He is working to develop what he calls an “idiot’s guide” to bacterial systematics—a system to identify the most newly divergent products of speciation even when we know very little about the ecological and physiological differences between new species. He is a professor of biology at Wesleyan University.

 

Publications:

http://works.bepress.com/frederick_cohan/

 

Lab blog:

http://cohanlab.research.wesleyan.edu/

Frederick Cohan grew up in Pasadena, California in a close family that ran a small drug store. He graduated from Pasadena High School, earned his B.S. in Biology at Stanford, and was awarded the first Ph.D. from Harvard's then-new department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. Under the mentorship of Richard Lewontin and then Timothy Prout, he used Drosophila to study the forces of cohesion within animal species. As he grew weary of changing flies, he seized an opportunity to reinvent himself as an evolutionary bacteriologist, with the guidance of Conrad Istock, Richard Michod, and John Spizizen. While he first saw bacteria as a convenient system for studying very general questions about evolution that one might rather study in elephants (if one could), he has grown to see bacteria as very interesting creatures in their own right. He is intrigued by what is the same and different about species and speciation across all walks of life, and investigates how the unique combination of enormous population size and rare but promiscuous genetic exchange in bacteria affect bacterial speciation and diversity. As a professor of biology at Wesleyan University, he teaches various courses in evolutionary biology, bioinformatics, and the effects of global change on infectious disease. He is a member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering.

Academic Affiliations

Office Hours

Fridays 1:15-2:00

Courses

Fall 2017
BIOL 173 - 01
Global Change & Infectious Dis

BIOL 507 - 01
Evolution Journal Club I

Spring 2018
BIOL 182 - 01
Principles of Biology II

BIOL 194 - 01
Biology II: Advanced Topics

BIOL 508 - 01
Evolution Journal Club II