Wesleyan portrait of Scott W. Aalgaard

Scott W. Aalgaard

Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies

Fisk Hall, 308
860-685-2484

saalgaard@wesleyan.edu

BA University of Victoria
MA University of Victoria
MA University of Chicago
PHD University of Chicago

Scott W. Aalgaard

Scott W. Aalgaard works on cultural production in modern and contemporary Japan, with particular emphases on popular music and literature. He is interested in questions of crisis and collectivity, and in the ways in which musical, literary, and other texts can be deployed as means of critical inquiry and intervention into the conditions of everyday life. Dr. Aalgaard's work addresses geopolitics, political economy, regional and social histories, nationalism, fascism, and disparate modes of protest and critique, among other topics. It is oriented toward understanding the ways in which artists, authors, and individual social actors understand the world, and envision different possibilities for living in it.

Dr. Aalgaard's scholarship aims to hear and amplify voices that can challenge and reshape our own stances upon the world. As such, his work deals with textual analysis, but also with lived experience in regions such as Kagoshima and Fukushima, where he pursues fieldwork in order to interrogate some of the diverse ways in which conextually-embedded social actors navigate the terms of their own lives. He is particularly interested in Japan's singer-songwriter and critical folk music traditions, and in the ways in which the critical legacies of the late sixties and early seventies continue to thread their way through conditions of life in modern and contemporary Japan. His work traces the desires and perspectives of fan communities, interrogating the ways in which individuals put music to use in the contexts of their own lives.

Academic Affiliations

Office Hours

Thursdays, 3:00PM to 5:00PM

Courses

Fall 2017
CEAS 180 - 01
Japan Rocks

CEAS 390 - 01
Japanese Women's Writing

Spring 2018
CEAS 300 - 01
Lit. of Japanese Empire

CEAS 395 - 01
Politics of the Everyday