hibiki

HIBIKI
MIZUNO

HOMETOWN:
Tokyo, Japan 
HIGH SCHOOL:
International Christian University High School
MAJOR:
American Studies and Social, Cultural, and Critical Theory Certificate  
THESIS:

My thesis is tentatively titled, “Alternative American Culture: Asian/Asian American Immigrant Identity and Representation after the Immigration Act of 1965.” I intend to explore how Asian immigrant cultural formations have grown against or within dominant American culture in representing the idea of “good citizen.”

FAVORITE CLASS:

I have two favorite classes that pushed me to embark on a thesis project—Media and Society and Representing Race in American Culture. The media class taught me how to critically engage with different types of technological mediums and introduced me to the present issues surrounding emerging forms like the Internet and social networks. Representing Race exposed me to critical race theory in African American and Asian American discourses, sparking my interest in studying the complex relation between representation and cultural formations.

CAMPUS
ACTIVITIES:

I am one of the organizers and editors of Pyxis, Wesleyan’s first humanities journal. I broadcast two radio shows on WESU-FM (our campus radio station), one of which features live student bands every week. Since my freshmen year, I have been performing in various dance department theses and dance shows and have played violin with the Wesleyan University Orchestra and Chamber Music Ensemble. I also have worked as a Japanese teaching assistant and course assistant as
well as a Japanese speaking partner, assisting students in conversational Japanese.

FAVORITE WESLEYAN EXPERIENCE:

One of my favorite moments at Wesleyan happened during Orientation week my sophomore year. A couple of friends and I started dancing frantically in front of the Foss Hill stage as bands performed and we ended up creating a huge crowd of non-stop dancers, including newly arrived
freshmen.

OUTSIDE WESLEYAN:

Last summer, I worked as a program intern for the American Museum of Natural History’s Margaret Mead Film Festival, a film festival held every fall featuring independent ethnographic and documentary films from all over the world, assisting in evaluating and writing about submitted films and organizing the museum’s summer programs.

 

AFTER WESLEYAN:

I plan to return to Japan and work in the performing arts,
entertainment, or film industry. Then after a couple years of working, I would like to pursue enrolling in graduate school for media studies to deepen my understanding of the relation between technology and society.

e-mail me »