CSS 230 - Sophomore Government

College of Social Studies

2012-2013
 State and Society in the Modern Age



Professor Elvin Lim
F, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
PAC 402 (CSS Library)

Office:  PAC 308
Office Hours:  F 6-7 pm and by appointment
Phone: 860.685.3459
E-mail:  elim@wesleyan.edu

Preceptor:  Sam Ebb
E-Mail:  sebb@wesleyan.edu

 

Week 1   Week 2   Week 3   Week 4   Week 5   Week 6   Week 7   Week 8

Description

The sophomore tutorial in government introduces students to the study of the dynamic relationship between the government and the governed, and the institutions and evolving forms of justification that accompanied these reconfigurations from the “Machiavellian moment” to the American republic. Along the way, students would be introduced to the method of inquiry of the thinkers of the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, who were, respectively, political philosophers and political scientists who balanced conflicting first principles and competing interests to proffer their period-specific answers to the perennial question, “who governs?”

Requirements

Students will be required to write a five-paged critical response essay, in size 12 font and 1-inch margins, arraying and synthesizing the arguments discussed in the assigned readings for each week, focusing on 1. the puzzle the authors are addressing, 2. their theses, and 3. the manner in which they actually or potentially interact. These essays are due on each Friday at the start of class. Please use a conventional system of citation , such as Chicago style, for all
essays.

Readings

Please purchase:

Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital and European States, AD 990-1990 (Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, 1990).

Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1966).

Samuel Huntington, Political Order in Changing Societies (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1968).

Alexis De Tocqueville, Democracy in America (New York: Penguin Classics, 2003).

All other readings are posted on our Moodle course page.

Schedule

Week 1: The Emergence of the State

• J. P. Nettl, “The State as a Conceptual Variable,” World Politics 20 (1968): 559- 592.
• Mancur Olson, “Dictatorship, Democracy, and Development”, American Political Science Review 87 (1993): 567-76.
• Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital and European States, AD 990-1990 (Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, 1990), Ch 1-3.

Week 2: Revolutions

• Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1971), Ch 1 & 2.
• Barry Weingast, “The Constitutional Dilemma of Economic Liberty”, Journal of Economic Perspectives,”
  19 (2005): 89-108.
• Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital and European States, AD 990-1990 (Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, 1990), Ch 4.

Week 3: Paths to Modernity

• Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World
  (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1966), Ch 1&2.
• Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital and European States, AD 990-1990 (Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, 1990), Ch 5.
• Leo Strauss, Natural Right and History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1953), Ch 1.

Week 4: The Challenges of Modernization

• Samuel Huntington, Political Order in Changing Societies (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1968),
  Ch 1, 2, 5, & 7.
• Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World
  (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1966), Ch 3.

Week 5: Machiavelli, Madison, and the “Science of Politics”

• J.G.A. Pocock, The Machiavellian Moment (Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1975), vii-x, Ch XV.
• René Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy, Meditation I, accessible here:
  http://www.classicallibrary.org/descartes/meditations/4.htm
• William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act III Scene ii, accessible here:
  http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/%7ejlynch/Texts/hamlet.html
• Federalist #1, accessible here http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/fed01.asp 3
• Gordon S. Wood, The Creation of the American Republic: 1776-1787 (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina
  Press, 1969), 44-82.

Week 6: Democracy in America

• Alexis De Tocqueville, Democracy in America (New York: Penguin Classics, 2003), Part I.
• Louis Hartz, “American Political Thought and the American Revolution,” The American Political Science Review 46
  (1952): 321-342.
• James Morone, Hellfire Nation: The Politics of Sin in American History (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003),
  1-28.

Week 7: The Modern State

• Stephen Skowronek, Building a New American State: The Expansion of National Administrative Capacities, 1877-1920
  (New York: Cambridge University   Press, 1982), Ch 1.
• Jacob S. Hacker “The Historical Logic of National Health Insurance: Structure and Sequence in the Development
  of British,   Canadian, and U.S. Medical   Policy,” Studies in American Political Development 12 (1998): 59-130.
• Gary Gerstle, “The Resilient Power of the States across the Long Nineteenth Century: An Inquiry into Pattern
  of American   Governance,” in Lawrence Jacobs and Desmond King (eds.), The Unsustainable American State
  (New York: Oxford University   Press, 2009), 61-87.
• Elvin T. Lim, The Lovers’ Quarrel: The Two Foundings and American Political Development
  (New York: Oxford University   Press, 2013), Ch 1 & 8.

Week 8: The Perils of Democracy

• Alfred Stepan and Cindy Skach, “Constitutional Frameworks and Democratic Consolidation: Parliamentarianism
  and Presidentialism,” World Politics 46 (1993): 1-22.
• Juan Linz, “The Perils of Presidentialism” Journal of Democracy 1 (1990): 51-69.
• Elvin T. Lim, The Anti-Intellectual Presidency: The Decline of Presidential Rhetoric from George Washington
  to George W. Bush (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008), Ch 2, 4 & 6.