East Department

Events

Thursday, January 30, 2014

06:00 pm - 07:30 pm

FEAS Lecture - The Silk Road: A New History

Valerie HansenProfessor of History, Yale University
The Silk Road: A New History
Whenever we speak of the Silk Road, the mind's eye conjures up a single merchant traveling on a camel laden with goods, most likely on his way to Rome. The discovery of multiple artifacts and excavated documents in northwest China allows us to revise this image. In fact, few people moving along the Silk Road were long-distance merchants. Under tight government supervision, merchants usually stayed on circuits close to home and exchanged goods for other goods, often not using coins at all.
Other Silk Road travelers included missionaries, refugees, artists, and envoys, who have left the clearest document footprint of all. The most active foreign community in China were Sogdians, migrants from Samarkand and the surrounding areas. They found new homes in the small oasis-states ringing the Taklamakan Desert whose rulers encouraged religious tolerance as they welcomed newcomers to their realms.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Thursday, February 06, 2014

12:00 pm - 04:00 pm

Exhibition: Mary Heebner - Silent Faces/Angkor

Closed Saturday, March 15 through Monday, March 24, 2014

In the multi dimensional installation Silent Faces/Angkor, Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. Ms. Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the bonds between humans and the earth. When she went to Cambodia's Angkor temple complex in 2000 and 2001, she began a series she called geography of a face to further her exploration of the connection between human and geographic form. Through both drawing and photography she engaged Angkor Wat's 12th-century frieze, the Churning of the Sea of Milk, and the other sculptural works there. While humans have always carved likenesses in stone, those figures just as surely erode and return to the earth. The ancient myth she studied and the eroded faces she read as maps shaped her path to creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and texts that make up this striking and profound installation. Ms. Heebner is an internationally known painter, book artist, writer, publisher, and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, The British Library, the New York Public Library, The J. P. Getty Research Library,
Dartmouth College,
the University of California, and Stanford University.

Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

12:00 pm - 01:00 pm

Opening and Gallery Talk: "Silent Faces/Angkor"

Opening and Gallery Talk with Curator Patrick Dowdey: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at Noon; a luncheon buffet will be served.

In the multi dimensional installation Silent Faces/Angkor, Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual, and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms. Ms. Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the bonds between humans and the earth. When she went to Cambodia's Angkor temple complex in 2000 and 2001, she began a series she called geography of a face to further her exploration of the connection between human and geographic form. Through both drawing and photography she engaged Angkor Wat's 12th-century frieze, the Churning of the Sea of Milk, and the other sculptural works there. While humans have always carved likenesses in stone, those figures just as surely erode and return to the earth. The ancient myth she studied and the eroded faces she read as maps shaped her path to creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and texts that make up this striking and profound installation. Ms. Heebner is an internationally known painter, book artist, writer, publisher, and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, The British Library, the New York Public Library, The J. P. Getty Research Library,
Dartmouth College,
the University of California, and Stanford University.

FEAS Gallery Room

Thursday, February 27, 2014

04:30 pm - 08:00 pm

Feas Lecture - Judaic Studies in Modern China: Functions of a Political Agenda

Dr. Jonathan Goldstein
Judaic Studies in Modern China: Functions of a Political Agenda
The history of Sino-Israeli relations, pointing out how the study of anything Judaic was impossible before the 1992 establishment of diplomatic relations between China China and Israel in 1992, Sino-Israeli academic collaboration in general and Judaic Studies in China in particular expanded significantly on many Chinese campuses, as did East Asian studies in Israel.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Thursday, March 06, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture - Recognition and Utilization of the Past in the Controversy on Koguryo History

Hyung-Wook Kim, Postdoctoral Associate, Council on East Asian Studies, Yale University

Recognition and Utilization of the Past in the Controversy on Koguryo History

How past has been recognized and utilized in favor of political situation in contemporary by examining the conflict between Republic of Korea and People's Republic of China regarding the ownership of Koguryo history.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Thursday, March 27, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture: 9th Tong Lecture, Xiaobing Tang

Xiaobing Max Tang, Helmut F. Stern Professor in Modern Chinese Studies, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Michigan

Professor Tang will discuss the practice and politics of exhibiting artwork in early twentieth-century China.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Monday, March 31, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture - From Divergence to Convergence: Re-evaluating the History Behind China's Economic Boom

Loren Brandt, Professor of Economics, University of Toronto
"From Divergence to Convergence: Re-evaluating the History Behind China's Economic Boom"

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Thursday, April 03, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture - Islands that Nobody and Everybody Wants: Japan's Territorial Disputes in Northeast Asia

Alexis Dudden, Professor of History, UCONN

Islands that Nobody and Everybody Wants: Japan's Territorial Disputes in Northeast Asia

For the past two decades, it has been a political sport in areas of Japan's former empire to make public demands that Japanese officials apologize for horrendous acts committed in their nation's name throughout the first half of the 20th century. In response, some Japanese politicians realized that they could generate substantial support as well as pride in something called "being Japanese" by openly denigrating or whitewashing particular histories - the Nanjing Massacre, the Japanese military's system of sexual slavery - and by calling narrators of these events liars and anti-Japanese. Claims about histories that took place 70-100 years ago have become more not less important to the central functioning of the states involved today, turning regional history problems into security issues. In particular, the islands left hanging in the San Francisco Treaty (1952) and terms of subsequent American security arrangements now find themselves at the center of this dynamic, with everyone summoning something they call history as judge.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Monday, April 07, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture by Artist Mary Heebner - Mapping the Geography of a Face

Mary Heebner, Artist, Writer

Mapping the Geography of a Face
In her work, Mary Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the connections between humans and the earth. When she visited Angkor Temple Complex in 2000 and 2001 she explored the myth of Angkor Wat's famous 700 foot long frieze, the Churning of the Sea of Milk and other sculptural works throughout the complex through both drawing and photography. She explored how little visual information you need to recognize a human face, and that although throughout time humans have carved likenesses in stone, eventually through time, these too return to earth. Heebner began a series called Geography of a Face, in which she explores the connection between human geographic form. The faces read as maps and the myth shaped the path to her creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and text that form Silent Faces Angkor. As she found further insight into the myth's relevance to the creative process her own narrative shifts from the traditional myth to an exploration into the nature of images and ideas that spark them. In this installation silent faces/Angkor, Heebner incorporates imagery and writing to create an interpretation of the myth that is elemental, spiritual and involving, and will provide new avenues of insight and wonder in this multi dimensional installation.
Mary Heebner is an internationally known book artist, writer, publisher, painter and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, National Gallery of Art, The British Library, The New York Public Library, Dartmouth College, University of California, University of Michigan and Stanford University.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

12:00 pm - 01:00 pm

Gallery Talk with Artist Mary Heebner - Silent Faces/Angkor

Gallery Talk with Artist Mary Heebner on Wednesday, April 9, 2014 at Noon; a luncheon buffet will be served.

In the multi dimensional installation Silent Faces/Angkor, Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms.
Mary Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the bonds between humans and the earth. When she went to Cambodia's Angkor temple complex in 2000 and 2001, she began a series she called geography of a face to further her exploration of the connection between human and geographic form. Through both drawing and photography she engaged Angkor Wat?s twelfth century frieze, the Churning of the Sea of Milk and the other sculptural works there. While humans have always carved likenesses in stone, those figures just as surely erode and return to the earth. The ancient myth she studied and the eroded faces she read as maps shaped her path to creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and texts that make up this striking and profound installation.

Mary Heebner is an internationally known painter, book artist, writer, publisher, and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, National Gallery of Art, The British Library, New York Public Library, The J. P. Getty Research Library, Dartmouth College, the University of California and Stanford University.

FEAS Gallery Room

Thursday, April 10, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture - Poetry Reading - Ancestral Intelligence

Vera Schwarcz, Professor of History, and East Asian Studies, Wesleyan University

Celebration of the publication of Ancestral Intelligence, with a reading by the author.

In Ancestral Intelligence, Vera Schwarcz has added a forceful and fascinating work to her ever-growing list of publications depicting the cultural landscape of contemporary China. Here, she has created stunning "renditions" of poems by a mid-20th Century dissident poet, Chen Yinke, and has added a group of her own poems in harmony with Chen Yinke's. Like his, her poems show a degradation of culture and humanity, in this case through comparison of classic and modern Chinese logographs.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Thursday, April 17, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture - Gender, Development, and "Missing Girls" in Asia

Monica Das Gupta, Research Professor, Sociology Department, university of Maryland

Gender, Development, and "Missing Girls" in Asia

The phenomenon of "missing girls" in Asia has attracted much attention. First, there are the human implications of practicing sex-selection to reduce the number of daughters in the family. Second, there are social repercussions when significant proportions of men are unable to find brides. This talk begins by examining which regions of the world show sex-selection. It then discusses the underlying causes of the phenomenon, the circumstances that intensify the practice, and the consequences for the marriage market. Finally, it examines what policies have helped reduce sex-selection.

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Monday, April 21, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture - Japanese Tea Ceremony

Stephen Morrell, Landscape Designer
Japanese Tea Ceremony

FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

04:30 pm - 06:00 pm

FEAS Lecture: A New Urban Uncanny in Postwar Japanese Avant-Garde Film and Art

Ryan Cook, Postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University's Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies. 2014, he will join the faculty of Emory University's Film and Media Studies department.

A New Urban Uncanny in Postwar Japanese Avant-Garde Film and Art

This talk will explore the golden years of Japanese horror cinema in the postwar years, before the horror film boom of the 1990s, in relation to the flourishing avant-garde of the era. The 1990s horror boom in Japan, accompanied by parallel developments in Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Thailand, can be seen in many cases as a product of the urban environment. Ghost stories explored city spaces haunted by memory - often neighborhoods or buildings in decline, if not already in ruins. The city these films encountered was a global city in recession, and globalization itself was arguably a subject of the most globally representative film of the group: Ringu. The case was different the last time that horror films (or "kaiki eiga") flourished in the Japanese cinema, during the heyday of the postwar studio system. Postwar kaiki films often drew on the Edo period repertoire of tales set in the countryside, or along the roads leading in and out of the early modern capital. These films were made during a period of intense urbanization, rebuilding and growth, and inherited the attitude of a modern city that had banished ghosts from its gates. By the 1960s, and in the midst of Japan?s high growth period, it was arguably the films and art of the avant-garde that most actively engaged with the lived space of the metamorphosing city, and in the process salvaged alleyways, side streets, plazas and "underground" rooms in which an often strange and monstrous environment encroached upon the official geography of "prosperity." This talk will trace the outlines of that uncanny postwar city imagined by experimental artists.


FEAS Seminar Room (Mary Houghton Freeman Room)

Sunday, April 27, 2014

08:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Spring Harmony: Chinese Music Concert

Wesleyan's Chinese Music Ensemble performs a variety of Chinese instrumental music--traditional, modern and hybrid--under the direction of graduate student Joy Lu.

World Music Hall

Friday, May 02, 2014

09:00 pm - 10:30 pm

Wesleyan Taiko Concert

Beginning, intermediate, and advanced students in the Taiko Drumming Ensemble perform the thunderous and exhilarating rhythms of Japanese Taiko drumming under the direction of Visiting Instructor in Music Barbara Merjan. Several dynamic styles will be showcased, demonstrating both traditional and contemporary Taiko repertoire.

Crowell Concert Hall