Intellectual Property

I want to assign and use images.

Start by:

Providing the full citation—in the style that you prefer your students to use—for the image that you have selected.  For example (in APA style): Giorgi, Bruno (Artist). Plaza of the Three Powers [Photo]. Brazil: The Hartill Archive of Architecture and Allied Arts. Or see "Citing What You Find." (To comply with the TEACH ACT, all materials must be fully cited each time you assign or use them.) Add a disclaimer like this one:

The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the reproduction of copyrighted materials. Under certain conditions specified in the law, university libraries and archives are authorized to provide reproductions. One of these specified conditions is that the reproduction be used for academic study, scholarship, or research only. This material has been made available solely for use in this course. The material may not be distributed to any person outside this class, electronically or in paper form without specific permission from the copyright holder. If you use a reproduction for purposes in excess of fair use without permission, you may be liable for copyright infringement. Further, circumvention of technological protection measures (Section 1201) is against the law.

If you know the copyright holder, you can add that too: © Alec and/or Marlene Hartill.

Then check:

Is the image available in one of the image specific databases that Wesleyan subscribes to?  Check ARTstorCAMIO, or AP Multimedia Archive, for example. Or, can the image be found on the Media Database ?

Yes, I found the image on a Wesleyan database.

You can:

  1. point to the link in your syllabus.
  2. make laser or desk jet prints of the content.
  3. make printed copies of images for book reports, term papers, theses, class handouts and research.
  4. create a course folder (ARTstor, for example, has many options. See "Best Practices for Faculty" http://www.artstor.org/info/using_artstor/BestPracticesF.pdf).
  5. make presentations, overhead projection, slide shows, etc.
  6. post the link to your course management system like Blackboard or add the link to your Wesleyan secure Web space.
  7. transmit an individual image to a specific e-mail user who is a current Wesleyan University faculty, staff or student.

You cannot:

  1. use images for publication in newspapers, magazines, brochures, catalogs, commercial announcements, calendars, posters, yearbooks, playbills, newsletters, on t-shirts, or promotional items or for commercial use or gain of any kind (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  2. electronically transmit images, or other such activity, except as allowed to Wesleyan University users noted above (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  3. post images or links to images on the World Wide Web (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).

 

No, Wesleyan does not subscribe to an archive that offers the image that I need.

You can:

acquire the image elewhere:
  • The Internet:  There are many image specific websites that will link you to a variety of online sources.   For example: “Boston University Libraries: Finding Images on the Web” at www.bu.edu/library/instruction/findimages;  “Finding Images Online: Links to Image Resources” at www.berinsteinresearch.com/fiolinks.htm . Search engines (Google, AltaVista, Ask Jeeves, etc.) provide image search options. 
  • Journals/magazines:  Some of the indexes that Wesleyan subscribes to allow you to specify an illustration search.  For example, Readers’ Guide and other WilsonWeb databases let you limit a search by physical description (illustration).
  • Books: In Caleb and the CTW catalog, you can try adding “ill” or “illus” (pre-1975) as a keyword when searching a topic. Your result list should be limited to books that are illustrated.

Then you can:

  1. use the image for an on-campus, in-class presentation.
  2. point to a link on the WWW from your course management system like Blackboardor secure Web space if you include the homepage information too. Read through the copyright information provided on the site first. You may need to ask permission.
  3. bring a paper image to digitization specialist and request that it be digitized. You may post the link to your course management system like Blackboard or add the link to your Wesleyan secure Web space. Read through the copyright information provided on the site first. You may need to ask permission.
  4. scan the image yourself and post the pdf to your course management system likeBlackboard or add the link to your Wesleyan secure Web space. Read through the copyright information provided on the site first. You may need to ask permission.

You cannot:

  1. use the image outside the physical or digital classroom (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  2. post images or links to images on the World Wide Web (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  3. print images and put them in a coursepack (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).

 

I want to assign and use images that are in the public domain.

Start by:

Defining "Public Domain." To be unambiguously in the public domain the image should be ca. 1923 or earlier (except government prints of FSA photographs). Or, you can consult a public domain table like this one from the University of Minnesota.

Provide the full citation—in the style that you prefer your students to use—for the image that you have selected.  For example (in APA style): Van Gogh, Vincent (Artist). Entrance to the public gardens in Arles [Painting]. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art. Or see"Citing What You Find." (A full citation is one of the few criteria for using work that is in the public domain.)

You can:

  1. find images anywhere—Wesleyan Library, The Davison Art Center another library, your own archive, Creative Commons Search , the World Wide Web (enter "Public Domain Images" in a search engine to bring up a myriad of Web archives, but use caution because you as the user are responsible for anything that you use) etc.—and use them, copy them point to a link to any portion of them, or digitize them.

You cannot:

  1. assign, link to or use any portion of a work in the public domain without a full citation. See "Citing What You Find."

For assistance

Susanne Javorski, Art and Reference Librarian, sjavorski@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3326
Allynn Wilkinson, Digitization Specialist, awilkinson@wesleyan.edu, ext. 4954 (for questions on digitization)
Library Reference Desk reference@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3873
Interlibrary Loan Office Ill@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3876
Eunjoo Lee, Access Services Librarian, elee01@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3454 (for questions about the e-reserve system or the Copyright Clearance Center)

For more information

DIRC. Digital ZImage Rights Computator http://vraweb.org/resources/ipr/dirc/
United States Copyright Office http://www.copyright.gov/
The Teach Act Toolkit: NCSU Libraries http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/scc/legislative/teachkit/
Copyright on Campus http://www.copyrightoncampus.com/
Education World http://www.education-world.com/a_curr/curr280e.shtml
CCC's Using Course Management Systems http://www.copyright.com/media/pdfs/Using-Course-Management-Systems.pd
Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org/
Creative Commons search http://search.creativecommons.org/
United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural organization's Copyright pagehttp://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=12313&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html 
Web Law FAQ http://www.patents.com/weblaw.htm 
Chilling Effects http://www.chillingeffects.org/
Russell, C. (2004) Complete Copyright, An Everyday Guide for Librarians. American Library Association.
Stim, R. (2004) Getting permission, how to license & clear copyrighted materials online & off. Berkeley, Nolo
Butler, R. P. (2004). Copyright for teachers and librarians. New York, Neal-Schuman Publishers.
Crews, K. D. (2000). Copyright essentials for librarians and educators. Chicago, IL, American Library Association.
Vaidhyanathan, S. (2001). Copyrights and copywrongs: the rise of intellectual property and how it threatens creativity. New York, New York University Press.

Scenarios

Copyright Management Center http://www.copyright.iupui.edu/fuscenarios.htm