Intellectual Property

I want to assign a journal article.

Start by:

Providing the full citation—in the style that you prefer your students to use—for the article that you have selected.  For example (in APA style): Bergh, J. S. (2005). We Must Never Forget Where We Come From: The Bafokeng and Their Land in the 19th Century Transvaal. History in Africa, 32, 1-19. Or see "Citing What You Find." (To comply with the TEACH ACT, all materials must be fully cited each time you assign or use them.) Add a copyright notice, Copyright © 2005 African Studies Association, and a disclaimer like this one:

The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the reproduction of copyrighted materials. Under certain conditions specified in the law, university libraries and archives are authorized to provide reproductions. One of these specified conditions is that the reproduction be used for academic study, scholarship, or research only. This material has been made available solely for use in this course. The material may not be distributed to any person outside this class, electronically or in paper form without specific permission from the copyright holder. If you use a reproduction for purposes in excess of fair use without permission, you may be liable for copyright infringement. Further, circumvention of technological protection measures (Section 1201) is against the law.

Then check:

Does Wesleyan subscribe to or own the issues of the journal?http://www.wesleyan.edu/libr/php/journallocator/jlocate.php
Or
Is the article located on one of Wesleyan’s databases (like Lexis-Nexis or Factiva)?http://www.wesleyan.edu/libr/php/iadtbl.php?list=full

Yes, the Journal is listed in the Journal locator or on a database and I was able to find the full text electronically.

You can:

  1. provide the hyperlink on you syllabus.  For example,http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/history_in_africa/v032/32.1adesoji.pdf  (remember to supply the full citation).
  2. post the link to your course management system like Blackboard or add the link to your Wesleyan secure Web space.
  3. have the reserve staff process the reading.
  4. print the article for yourself.

You cannot:

  1. cut and paste the article to a page on the World Wide Web (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  2. print the article and put it in a coursepack (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).

Yes, the Journal is listed in the Journal locator, but I was unable to find the full text electronically.

If the journal is located in the stacks.  You can:

  1. scan the article and put the PDF link on your secure course management system like Blackboard (turn guest access OFF) or add it to your secure Web space. Make sure to provide the full citation.
  2. have the reserve staff process the reading.
  3. copy the article for yourself.  Make sure to put the full citation on your copy.

You cannot:

  1. provide the link to your PDF file on the World Wide Web (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so). If you decide to post your syllabus on the  WWW, remove the link, but leave the citation.
  2. scan the article and place the text on the WWW (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  3. print the article and put it in a coursepack (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).

No.  Wesleyan does not subscribe to the journal.  I was unable to find the Journal on the Journal locator, and I was unable to find the article on a Wesleyan subscribed database.

You can:

  1. find the article elsewhere—on the WWW, through interlibrary loan your own subscription or purchase, etc.—and submit a reserve requesthttp://www.wesleyan.edu/libr/reserve/resvreq.html.
  2. create a hyperlink to a stable, reliable link on the WWW from within your course management system like Blackboard or from your secure Web space provided that the site that you are pointing to is legal. The new page must open in a new browser window. Make sure to read through the copyright information on the site that you are pointing to. You may need to ask permission or follow specific guidelines. If in doubt, ask the site's Web master. Make sure to provide the full citation to the article that you are accessing, and provide the link for the homepage too if you are pointing to a deep link.
  3. check to see if item is available through the CTW catalog.  If so, you may request that the article be put on reserve through the online catalog/reserve system. (See “Directions to submit an electronic request via the online catalog.”)
  4. copy the article for yourself.  Make sure to put the full citation on your copy.

You cannot:

  1. print the article and put it in a coursepack (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  2. digitize the article yourself (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).
  3. copy and paste content from another Web site (without getting specific permission from the copyright holder to do so).

For assistance

Helen Aiello, Serials Librarian, haiello@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3828 (for help finding an article or a subscribtion, and any other question about journals) 
Library Reference Desk reference@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3873 (for help finding an article or navigating the system)
Eun Joo Lee, Access Services Librarian, elee01@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3454 (for copyright issues and reserve questions)
Interlibrary Loan Office Ill@wesleyan.edu, ext. 3876 (for interlibrary loan queries only)

For more information

United States Copyright Office http://www.copyright.gov/
The Teach Act Toolkit: NCSU Libraries http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/scc/legislative/teachkit/
Copyright on Campus http://www.copyrightoncampus.com/
Education World http://www.education-world.com/a_curr/curr280e.shtml
CCC's Using Course Management Systems http://www.copyright.com/media/pdfs/Using-Course-Management-Systems.pd
United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural organization's Copyright pagehttp://portal.unesco.org/culture/en/ev.php-URL_ID=12313%26URL_DO=DO_TOPIC%26URL_SECTION=201.html
Creative Commons http://creativecommons.org/
Creative Commons search http://search.creativecommons.org/
Web Law FAQ http://www.patents.com/weblaw.htm 
Chilling Effects http://www.chillingeffects.org/
Russell, C. (2004) Complete Copyright, An Everyday Guide for Librarians. American Library Association.
Stim, R. (2004) Getting permission, how to license & clear copyrighted materials online & off. Berkeley, Nolo
Butler, R. P. (2004). Copyright for teachers and librarians. New York, Neal-Schuman Publishers.
Crews, K. D. (2000). Copyright essentials for librarians and educators. Chicago, IL, American Library Association.
Vaidhyanathan, S. (2001). Copyrights and copywrongs: the rise of intellectual property and how it threatens creativity. New York, New York University Press.

Scenarios

Copyright Management Center http://www.copyright.iupui.edu/fuscenarios.htm