Commitment Form

Please answer the following questions honestly and thoughtfully in a word document. Members in WesDEF work closely and openly together, so we want to know all about you! This form is due by April 11th by email (theWesDEFs@gmail.com). If you have any questions, please email us or come by our weekly meeting 7-8PM on Tuesdays in Usdan 136. Also take some time to look at what being an active member of WesDEFs entails (see mission statement and commitment below). Thank you for applying!

Mission Statement

WesDEF, the Wesleyan Diversity Education Facilitation program conducts workshops facilitated by students for students, mainly freshman. Workshop leaders will facilitate conversations about race, gender, sexual orientation, class and other identities and their effect on community. The purpose of WesDEF workshops is not to provide answers but to incite questions and to provide participants with the knowledge and tools for further personal exploration and social awareness. Workshops will also help to create a space that emphasizes safety to engage in productive in-depth dialogue to promote understanding about how oppression works at Wesleyan and in society. 

As an active member committing to the WesDEF program for the fall of 2010 I will:

(1) Attend training during the Spring of 2010 AND orientation week before the Fall 2010 semester begins 
(2) Attend and participate in weekly WesDEF meetings
(3) Participate in campus facilitations throughout the Fall 2010 semester

Training will be held by current and former WesDEF members, and will provide a space for dialogue and shared learning about diversity, oppression, and social justice through. Further goals of training are to promote group cohesion, pass down WesDEF history, and reflect/plan the fall semester's objectives. A student forum will be offered for credit during Fall 2010 that will provide a classroom space for training and learning about social justice education and the facilitation of anti-oppression conversations. All WesDEFs are strongly encouraged to participate. The rest of the program's undertakings depend on how the group believes they can best enact anti-oppression work in the Wesleyan community; a commitment to the program also entails investment in developing those initiatives.

Questions

1. How do you identify yourself?
2. What are you into?
3. What is an experience you have had at Wesleyan that you believe should be addressed to the Wesleyan community? Is there anything else outside of Wesleyan you believe should be addressed? In what ways would you like to see yourself, WesDEF, or other members of the Wesleyan community address these?
4. What might be difficult for you to talk about (during facilitations or the student forum, for example) and why?
5. WesDEF works to facilitate dialogue and spark conversations. What do you think the outcome of this work could look like by the end of Fall 2010?