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WESEMINARS

 

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminars
Voices of Liberal Learning is Wesleyan University ’s series of compelling educational programs for alumni, parents, students, and friends. Wesleyan brings together leaders and visionaries in a variety of forums, creating opportunities for you to engage the world and the issues that shape our universe. Join us for presentations by activists, innovators, entrepreneurs, artists, writers, and scientists —the voices of liberal learning.
 

WESEMINARS
WESeminars are among the most popular and well-attended programs in Wesleyan ’s Voices Of Liberal Learning series. Interactive and inspiring,
WESeminars are opportunities to revisit the classroom and reexperience first-hand the academic excellence that is the essence of Wesleyan, presented by scholars, pundits, and other experts in their fields. Rekindle your connection to Wesleyan and the outstanding scholarship and teaching that take place every day on campus by attending one or more WESeminars during Reunion and Commencement 2006.


Thursday, May 25

Thursday, 3 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 1

Forensic Geology: “It’s Elementary”
In spring 2004, Timothy Ku offered a new course, “Forensic Geology,” which he believed would tap into the growing interest of students in crime scene investigations, and, at the same time, introduce proper methods of analyzing geologic materials. Interest in the course was strong from the beginning, with the first offering producing a wait list of 292 students. Course work includes reviewing actual criminal cases and considering geologic subjects and techniques from a forensic point of view. Students analyze everything from sand, soil, limestone, and fossils, to cat hair, cotton fibers, asbestos, and explosives; they make visual inspections and learn to use more high tech methods that include polarized light miscroscopy and x-ray defraction. The course ends with hypothetical criminal cases, real “whodunits?” that allow students to demonstrate mastery of analytical methods. Roll up your sleeves, dust off your magnifying glasses, and join Professor Ku for an introduction to forensic geology.
Presenter: Timothy Ku, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences

Location: Kerr Lecture Hall, Hall-Atwater, Church Street (formerly Shanklin 107)

 

Friday, May 26

Friday, 10 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 2

Alzheimer’s Disease: Genetics, Models, Mechanisms, and Therapeutics
For more than four decades, Dr. Donald Price has investigated a variety of human illnesses, particularly neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Taking advantage of advances in genetics, molecular biology, and techniques to produce genetically engineered animal models of these diseases, he and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University have clarified disease mechanisms, identified therapeutic targets, and tested novel therapies in animal models of AD, PD, ALS, and other human illnesses. He will describe his research on Alzheimer’s Disease, the most common cause of memory loss and dementia in late life, which affects approximately 4.5 million people in the United States.
Presenter: Donald Price ’56, professor of pathology, neurology and neuroscience, Departments of Pathology, Neurology and Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Location: Room 116, Judd Hall, 207 High Street

 

Friday, 11 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 3

Never Do Anything You Love For Money
Classmates Andy Glantz and Miguel Gomez-Ibanez both changed careers in their 40s to become professional furniture makers. They did not know each other at Wesleyan, but reconnected in 2004 when they found themselves serving together on the Board of Trustees of The Furniture Society, an international association of furniture artists, designers, gallery owners, and collectors. Glantz and Gomez-Ibanez will show their work and discuss their respective transitions from careers they trained for and successfully pursued for many years, to a new focus that gave them enjoyment, meaning, and, at least, a modest income.
Presenters: Andrew Glantz ’71, MA ’72, former teacher, and now a contemporary furniture designer and maker; Miguel Gomez-Ibanez ’71 P’00, licensed architect and former president of his own design firm, who now designs and builds traditionally inspired furniture

Location: Room 002, Public Affairs Center (PAC), 238 Church Street

 

Friday, 12:15 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 4

Connecticut River Expedition - THIS PROGRAM IS FULLY SUBSCRIBED AND WE CAN NO LONGER ACCEPT RESERVATIONS
Rain or shine, board the RiverQuest, specially reserved for our four-hour Connecticut River excursion exploring one of the “Seven Sisters,” a hill formed by metamorphosed sediments deposited in an ocean which has long since disappeared. Follow a beautiful creek bordered by wetlands. Osprey may fly overhead, but watch out for Swancilla. Dock and discover Selden Island, which is composed of rocks 600 million years old, which formed offshore Antarctica and drifted north. The trip takes approximately four hours, including travel to and from the boat launch, which will be provided. Space is limited and advance reservations are required. The trip will depart from campus on Friday, May 26, at 12:15 p.m.
Presenter: Jelle deBoer, Harold T. Stearns Professor of Earth Sciences Emeritus; Joel LaBella, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Location: Meet in the front lobby, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street


Friday, 1 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 5

Wes Press: Then and Now
In 2007, Wesleyan University Press will celebrate its 50th birthday. A lot has happened in those 50 years. The Press has published more than 1,000 books, and won four Pulitzer Prizes and three National Book Awards, while its poetry list was recently hailed by The New York Times as “remarkable for its longevity and reputation of excellence.” Join the Press’s founding director and current director to discover the history of this remarkable institution. Browse the shelves in the Press’s library, meet the staff, and hear how recent trends in technology are influencing the mission and practice of academic publishing, and how a small press continues to publish great books.
Presenters: Willard A. Lockwood ’46 P’78, founding director, Wesleyan University Press; Suzanna L. Tamminen, ’90, MALS ’96, director, Wesleyan University Press

Location: Wesleyan University Press, 215 Long Lane

 

Friday, 1:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 6

Reflections of World War II Veterans
Join alumni veterans of World War II for a roundtable conversation about the mood of the country and on the Wesleyan campus during the tumultuous war years. Hear firsthand stories about when these alumni enlisted, how long they served, where they were stationed, and how the war affected them at the time and in the years that fol-lowed.
Presenters: Henry B. Anderson ’40, MA’48; George Morrill ’42, MA’57

Location: Kerr Lecture Hall, Hall-Atwater, Church Street (formerly Shanklin 107)

 

Friday, 2 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 7

The Senior Thesis—A Showcase for Academic Excellence
The senior thesis is a year-long, in-depth project that provides students with a unique opportunity to explore fresh ideas and produce new knowledge. In this session, we highlight several senior theses representing a cross section of student research and creative output from the natural sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities. Students will share their work and discuss the processes that guided their investigations.
Moderator: David Phillips, dean for the Class of ’06
Presenters:: Students to be announced after completion of senior theses in spring 2006.

Location: Room 116, Judd Hall, 207 High Street

 

Friday, 2:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 8

In Pursuit of Highway Safety
We’re a nation that loves cars and the mobility they afford us. But this mobility has always been balanced against the number of serious injuries and deaths associated with our highways. In trying to improve safety, many changes have been made in vehicle design, and much new legislation has been passed. Most vehicles now have air bags, and new drivers are awarded driving privileges incrementally in many states. Laws have also been passed requiring seat belt use and deterring alcohol-impaired driving. Join this international authority on highway safety for his assessment of the progress we’ve made and the most challenging issues we face to-day.
Presenter: Allan Williams ’61, P’89, former senior vice president and chief scientist at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Dr. Williams is a social psychologist whose research helped form the basis for child restraint laws, seat belt law enforcement programs, minimum drinking age legislation, and graduated licensing for beginning drivers.

Location: Room 58, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street

 

Friday, 3 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 9

Lost—and Found—Wesleyan
Wesleyan, like any institution, is constantly changing. From architecture to student customs, many aspects of Wesleyan have been lost or changed over years. At the same time, new evidence of the past is found, new buildings are built, and new customs are forged. Join university archivists for an in-depth look at artifacts and images of a Wesleyan that is now lost or changed, and see newly discovered materials related to Wesleyan’s past. This program is limited to 20 participants.
Presenters: Valerie Gillispie, assistant university archivist; Suzy Taraba ‘77, university archivist and head of Special Collections

Location: Davison Rare Book Room, Olin Memorial Library
 

Friday, 3:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 10

Lost Battalions: The Great War and Crisis of American Nationality
During the bloodiest days of World War I, no soldiers served more valiantly than the African-American troops of the 369th Infantry—the fabled Harlem Hell Fighters—and the legendary “lost battalion” composed of “undesirable” New York City immigrants (largely Jews) drawn from the 77th Division, known as the Statue of Liberty Division. Though these men had lived up to their side of the bargain as loyal American soldiers, earning the right to first-class citizenship, the country to which they returned chose to maintain and even extend Jim Crow and other laws and patterns of social behavior that had stigmatized them. In his latest book, Lost Battalions, Professor Richard Slotkin takes the pulse of a nation struggling with social inequality during a decisive historical moment. Join him for an interactive dis-cussion of the social history chronicled in his book.
Presenter: Richard Slotkin, Olin Professor of English and professor of American studies, and author of Abe: A Novel of the Young Lincoln; Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America; and Lost Battalions: The Great War and Crisis of American Nationality. Professor Slotkin is a 1999 recipient of the Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

Location: Memorial Chapel
 

Friday, 4:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 11

Hard Cider: Rediscovering a New England Classic
John Adams had a mug for breakfast every day; Robert Frost celebrated it in his poetry. Hard cider, the fermented juice of selected blends of special cider apples, used to be the vin du pays of New England, until Prohibition drove it underground in the twentieth century. Now, though, thanks to Stephen Wood and Louisa Spencer of Leba-non, New Hampshire, you can again taste cider—hard cider—at its very best. Since 1987, this dedicated couple has been cultivating dozens of classic apple varieties and exploring techniques of fermentation, blending, and aging to create vintages that are clean, complex, deliciously subtle, and uniquely reflective of the New England landscape. Join them for a tasting of their ciders, and discover why they have garnered rave reviews from critics at The New York Times, Saveur, Food and Wine, and Martha Stewart Living.
Presenters: Suzanne O’Connell, associate professor of earth and environmental sciences and her husband, garden writer Thomas Christopher, are home cider “vintners” in Middletown. Stephen Wood and Louisa Spencer are the owners of Farnum Hill Ciders in Lebanon, N.H.

Location: Kerr Lecture Hall, Hall-Atwater, Church Street (formerly Shanklin 107)

 

Friday, 7:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 12

To Kitt Peak and Back
Astronomy is an experimental science, and the observatory is the astronomer’s laboratory. One of the goals of Astronomy 211, a sophomore-level general education course, is to bring part of the research experience to the classroom by introducing students to astronomical instrumentation and observational techniques. In spring 2005, it was the other way around: students went to Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona to participate in their instructor’s research. Meet the students who joined Professor Moran in Arizona; see their pictures and learn firsthand about their research results, and the impact of the trip on their future plans.
Presenters: Edward Moran, assistant professor of astronomy and a frequent visitor to Kitt Peak since 1991; Raomej Caro ’07; Seth Cohen ’07; Christopher Dieck ’07; Matthew Johnson ’07 (three of whom are now majoring in astronomy)

Location: Hansel Lecture Hall, Public Affairs Center (PAC), 238 Church Street (formerly PAC 001)

 

Friday, 7:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 13

Protocols of Zion
Despite all the evidence to the contrary, many people around the world continue to blame the Jews for the tragedy of 9/11. This belief is a modern-day incarnation of the infamous forgery, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, a hundred-year-old book falsely believed to contain the Jews’ master plan to rule the world. In the documentary film, Protocols of Zion, veteran filmmaker Marc Levin ’73 challenges this persistent and insidious conspiracy theory and explores its resurgence of popularity in modern times. Join us for a screening of the film followed by a discussion with Levin and co-producer Jennifer Tuft ’01.
Introduction: Jeanine Basinger, Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, curator of the Cinema Archives, Chair of the Film Studies Department, and a 1996 recipient of the Binswanger Prize for Excellence.
Presenters: Marc Levin ’73, P’05, award-winning filmmaker, whose film SLAM won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize in 1998 and the Camera D’Or at the Cannes Film Festival; Jennifer Tuft ’01, independent film producer.

Location: The Goldsmith Family Cinema, Center for Film Studies, 301 Washington Terrace

 

Friday, 8 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 14

Duet: A Performance By Eiko & Koma
Since 1972, Japanese-born choreographers/dancers Eiko & Koma have created a unique and riveting theater of movement out of stillness, shape, light and sound. Broadly trained, they studied with Kazuo Ohno in Japan, Manja Chmiel in Germany, and Lucas Hoving in the Netherlands before moving to New York in 1976. Since then, Eiko & Koma have presented their works in theaters, universities, museums, galleries, and festivals worldwide, including five appearances at BAM’s Next Wave Festival and a month-long “living” gallery installation in the Whitney Museum of American Art. Recently Eiko & Koma’s focus has been to present their outdoor works—River, The Caravan Project, Offering, and Tree Song—as free events in public sites. Join them for a performance of their original work Duet, which Margo Jefferson from The New York Times reviewed, saying “I don’t think anyone in the theater dared to breathe . . .” Following the performance, the artists will answer questions and talk about their three decades of dance.
Presenters: Eiko Otake P’07 and Takashi “Koma” Otake P’07 are performance artists and MacArthur Fellows whose work has been honored on five continents. Eiko is one of 11 founding artists of the Center for Creative Research (CCR), a pilot project designed to promote long-term relationships between innovative movement artists and academic institutions. She is currently a CCR Resident Artist at Wesleyan.
Cosponsor: The Freeman Asian/Asian American Initiative

Location: World Music Hall, Center for the Arts

 

Saturday, May 27

Saturday, 9:30 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 15

After Wesleyan: A Conversation with Members of the Class of 1951
The Class of 1951 was a mid-term class in every way; 225 students began with the class in 1947 and 193 graduated in 1951—mid-century, and between two wars. WWII was just over and the “police action” in Korea made it a war in every sense. Many in the class had served in the “Big War,” and many more found themselves serving during the Korean engagement. As a class, 1951 was filled with leaders in medicine, science, academia, business, and in the non-profit world. 51-ers also stood out for their devotion to Wesleyan and set records year after year for attendance at class reunions and for their support of the university. Catch-up with members of this remarkable class and find out what it was that propelled so many of them into positions of leadership.
Moderator: Ralph “Biff” Shaw ’51, P ’79, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Middlesex County Community Foundation, a group that provides support for local programs related to health, human services, the arts, and the environment, and retired Chairman and CEO of Farmers and Mechanics Bank in Middletown, CT.
Presenters: Charles Exley Jr. ’51, P ’83, GP ’00, retired CEO and Chairman of NCR and former Wesleyan Trustee; Kenneth Kenigsberg ’51, P ’89, retired pediatric surgeon, currently working in the laboratory on sepsis as a post-doctoral research fellow; David Trask ’51, former chief historian for the U.S. Federal Government and retired professor of history, SUNY, at Stony Brook

Location: Room 116, Judd Hall, 207 High Street

 

Saturday, 9:30 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 16

Green Street Arts Center: An Important Town-Gown Collaboration
It's been said that art can transform individuals as well as neighborhoods and communities. With this goal in mind, Wesleyan, in collaboration with  the City of Middletown, the North End Action Team (NEAT), and other local community groups, has renovated a three-story, 12,800-square-foot building in Middletown’s North End. The former public school building, built in 1878, has been completely redesigned by the renowned Centerbrook Architects and provides a state-of-the-art facility for community enrichment programs. Get acquainted with GSAC by joining us for a lively presentation, which will be followed by a short tour of the center. Transportation will be provided to and from the center and our drivers promise to return all visitors to campus in plenty of time for the annual parade.
Presenters: Janis Astor del Valle, interim director, Green Street Arts Center; Maritza Quiñones, president, North End Action Team and After-School Program Assistant, Green Street Arts Center
Note: University shuttles will be available across campus to provide transportation to the Center between 10 a.m.–5 p.m. on Friday and between 10 a.m.–2:30 p.m. on Saturday.

Location: Room 210, Risk Hall, 262 High Street

 

Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 17

Religion and Film
Professors Zwelling and Gottschalk argue that films in contemporary cultures do many of the same things that religion does. They shape our thinking, reinforce prevailing myths and create new ones, influence moral codes, and construct and perpetuate social values. Join them for a viewing of short film clips and a discussion of some of the topics addressed in their new course, “Relgion and Film,” offered in spring 2006.
Presenters: Jeremy Zwelling, associate professor of religion and director of the Jewish and Israel Studies Certificate Program; Peter Gottschalk, associate professor of religion

Location: Kerr Lecture Hall, Hall-Atwater, Church Street (formerly Shanklin 107)

 

Saturday, 10 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 18

The Impact of Sports in American Society
Many Americans schedule their lives around Superbowl Sunday, the Final Four, the World Series, the U.S. Open, and other major sports events. And they enroll their children as young as 4 or 5 years old in organized sports such as Little League Baseball, Pee Wee Basketball, Youth Soccer, Midget Football, and Mite Hockey. Sports metaphors dominate headlines and sound-bites, and a high-five has become a standard greeting among friends. How does this focus on sports in America influence our culture, and what does the investment of time and money mean for our economy? Check your game plan and join the huddle as we talk about the impact of sports in America.
Presenter: Bob Whitsitt P’06, consultant and former president of the Seattle Seahawks, Portland Trailblazers, and Seattle Supersonics; Jed Hoyer ’96, Assistant General Manager, Boston Red Sox

Location: Room 150, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street

 

Saturday, 10 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 19

Healing Our Bodies—Healing the Planet
Classmates Joel Kreisberg and Tom Land are environmental advocates who care greatly about the future of our planet. But their stewardship springs from two very different places. Kreisberg is a medical professional and a health educator who believes medical schools aren’t teaching practitioners about the environmental effects of medicine. To address this, he created the Teleosis Institute, which educates healthcare professionals about ecologically sustainable medicine. Land is a mainstream environmentalist who works for the EPA and studies changes in the Earth’s stratosphere, the atmospheric layer that protects us from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays.
Join these committed environmentalists for an honest discussion about the many things we can do to heal our bodies, and, at the same time, heal the planet.
Presenters: Joel Kreisberg ’81, executive director of the Teleosis Institute, doctor of chiropractic, and certified classical homeopath; Thomas Land ’81,manager of Inter-national Programs, Stratospheric Ozone Layer Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Location: Room 121, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street

 

Saturday, 10 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 20

The Making Of Cambodian Stories
Cambodian Stories is a stunning collaboration between Japanese-born choreographers and dancers Eiko & Koma and 10 young artists who study at the Reyum Painting Collective in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Known for their unique and riveting theater, Eiko & Koma use Cambodian stories to explore the intersection of youthful bodies and the Cambodian landscape, reaching across boundaries of language, culture, and art form. Join them for a review of the April performance at Wesleyan, which featured music composed by alumnus Sam-Ang Sam ’89 PhD, and was the only New England stop on an 11-city U.S. tour. The program will include a 23-minute film clip of the spring performance.
Presenters: Eiko Otake P’07 and Takashi “Koma” Otake P’07 are performance artists and MacArthur Fellows whose work has been honored on five continents. Their most recent works have been site-adaptable outdoor performance installations; Samuel Miller ’75, P’09, is president of Leveraging Investments in Creativity and was the former director of the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA) in Boston, Mass., where he pioneered the National Dance Project and Cambodian Artists Project.

Location: Seminar Room, Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies, 343 Washington Terrace

 

Saturday, 10 a.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 21

A Rational Drug Policy for Contemporary America
Reunion & Commencement Weekend is a time for reflection, and many will recall the impact that drug use had on their experiences on campus. Those who were at Wesleyan (and elsewhere across the country) during the ’60s and ’70s participated in a great cultural change that was pivotal in the development of modern drug policy. The nation has moved from the “War on Drugs” metaphor to a public health approach, to prevention, intervention and treatment, Andrea Barthwell ’76 has been at the center of defining a rational drug policy. Please join her as she recalls her campus experiences, examines the impact of the ’60s and ’70s on contemporary drug policy, and discusses her experiences in the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.
Presenter: Andrea Barthwell ’76, founder and CEO, EMGlobal LLC, a global healthcare and policy consulting firm; and former deputy director for Demand Reduction in the Office of National Drug Control Policy, serving as a principal advisor in the Executive Office of the President on policies aimed at reducing the demand for illicit drugs
Sponsored by: the Black Alumni Council

Location: Hansel Lecture Hall, Public Affairs Center (PAC), 238 Church Street

 

Saturday, 1:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 22

Philip Trager: A Retrospective
For 30 years Philip Trager balanced simultaneous careers as a lawyer and as a photographer renowned internationally for his images of architecture and modern dance. The exhibition, “Philip Trager: A Retrospective,” celebrates his insightful eye and immaculate skill with the camera. On display at both the Davison Art Center and Zilkha Gallery, the exhibition includes Trager’s early photographs of Connecticut, dramatic views of Manhattan, and emblematic images of the Italian villas of Palladio. In photographs of Mark Morris, Ralph Lemon, Eiko and Koma, and other dancers, Trager captured the energy and movement of modern dance. Throughout his career, Trager has maintained a close relationship with Wesleyan. A notable highlight was the portfolio Wesleyan Photographs, 1982, in which Trager recorded the architecture of Wesleyan with fresh eyes. Join Trager in the Zilkha Gallery to hear more about his art and life.
Introduction: Clare Rogan, curator, Davison Art Center
Presenter: Philip Trager ’56, P ’81, former attorney, and critically acclaimed photographer whose work has been exhibited by the Witkin Gallery in New York, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. His work is included in numerous museum collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Smithsonian Institution.
“Philip Trager: A Retrospective” has been organized by the Davison Art Center together with the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. The exhibit will travel to various venues including the Library of Congress.

Location: Zilkha Gallery, Center for the Arts
 

Saturday, 1:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 23

Moving America—A Discussion Of American Transportation Today And Tomorrow
America’s transportation system has always played a key role in connecting the nation’s regions and in assuring our economic prosperity. Investments in river navigational improvements, ports, canals, railroads, aviation, and highways have also shaped our communities and influenced our environment. Now, on the 50th anniversary of the authorization of the Interstate Highway program, America faces fundamental questions about the capacity, efficiency, safety, and security of the nation’s transportation system. What is the role of the Federal government in transportation? How can we assure that the nation’s system of highways, railroads, and other surface transportation modes will continue to provide for economic competitiveness and sustainable communities? What are our priorities, and how will the necessary transportation investments be financed?
Presenters: Richard Adelstein, professor of economics and a 1993 recipient of the Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching; Emil Frankel ’61, senior vice president, Parsons Brinckerhoff, an international transportation engineering and consulting company, former assistant secretary for transportation policy with the U.S. Department of Transportation, and Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Transportation from 1991–1995; Robert Gallamore ’63, professor of managerial economics and director of the Transportation Center, Northwestern University

Location: Hansel Lecture Hall, Public Affairs Center (PAC), 238 Church Street (formerly PAC 001)

 

Saturday, 3 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 24

Argentine Tango

Argentine Tango often conjures up images of dancers with roses between their teeth, sequined dresses, and entwined legs. Caroline Peattie and her husband Christopher Nassopoulos were attracted to the social variations of the Tango they saw in the clubs of Buenos Aires and wanted to introduce people to the subtleties of this sublime form of dance. They have been dancing, teaching, and performing around the country together since 1998, and have taught the social form of Argentine Tango to people with professional dance backgrounds as well as to those who claim to have two left feet. They emphasize connection, musicality, and simplicity in their teaching and their own dance. They also bring backgrounds of martial arts, yoga, pilates, and other forms of movement to their teaching. Join them for a fun and relaxed introduction to the Argentine Tango.
Presenters: Caroline Peattie ’81, Executive Director, Senior Fair Housing, San Rafael, California and professional dance instructor who specializes in the Argentine Tango; Christopher Nassopoulos, importer of fine Greek foods by day and Argentine tanguero at night

Location: Bessie Schonberg Dance Studio, 247 Pine Street

 

Saturday, 2 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 25

Parenting Through the Admission Process
Nancy Hargrave Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid, will moderate a panel of Wesleyan-connected parents to share lessons learned from taking their own children through the college search process. Come hear advice about the roles for parents as families go through the increasingly complex and often stressful college admission process.
Presenters: Nancy Hargrave Meislahn, dean of admission and financial aid; Barbara-Jan Wilson, vice president for university relations and former dean of admission and financial aid; Gregory Pyke, senior associate dean of admission; Carol Scully P’08, director of foundation and corporate relations; Irma V. González ’78, P ’09, Director of Communications and Development, Proteus Fund, and former Wesleyan Trustee

Location: Room 002, Public Affairs Center (PAC), 238 Church Street

 

Saturday, 2 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 26

From Civil Union to Marriage Equality
How did the lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender civil rights movement that articulated fundamental challenges to traditional sexuality and family find itself fighting for marriage equality? Can a struggle for traditional rights lead to transformational social change? Will laws providing civil unions lead to full marriage rights? Join long-time lesbian and feminist activist Leslie Gabel-Brett for a discussion about the current LGBT fight for marriage equality in Connecticut and across the country.
Presenter: Leslie J. Gabel-Brett ’76 is executive director of the Connecticut Permanent Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) and former chairperson of the state’s Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities. She currently serves on the steering committee of Love Makes a Family, an organization fighting for full marriage equality. She and Carolyn, her partner of 26 years, were married in Massachusetts last year.

Location: Kerr Lecture Hall, Hall-Atwater, Church Street (formerly Shanklin 107)
 

Saturday, 2 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 27

Risk, Ethics, and Entrepreneurship
Has American business entered a new phase? Is there a changed culture in the U.S. economy, with restatements of earnings, revelation of corporate misdeeds, and legislative reaction in Washington? Have ethical standards been mislaid as risk has increased? Have leadership and entrepreneurship become more difficult? Is the current climate an unnecessary drag on the market economy? Join these savvy business leaders for an in-depth discussion about whether our current education system is up to the task of preparing corporate leaders, citizens, and politicians for the challenges of the 21st century?
Moderator: Richard Miller, Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics
Presenters: Timothy Dibble ’86, a managing general partner of Alta Communications, Inc., a venture capital firm based in Boston that specializes in equity in-vestments in media, telecommunications, and Internet services companies; Charles Exley Jr. ’51, P’83, retired CEO and Chairman of NCR and former Wesleyan Trustee; Cornelia “Connie” McCann ’76, former Wesleyan Trustee, and managing director of Spencer Stuart’s North American Financial Services Practice, who has led a wide range of searches for senior executives

Location: Memorial Chapel
 

Saturday, 2 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 28

Before Christopher Columbus There Was Zheng He
Zheng He was a towering maritime figure who stands out in the annals of China’s 4,000 year history. He is considered a visionary who imagined a new world be-yond China’s borders and set out to find it, 80 years before Christopher Columbus set sail. A Muslim captured by the Chinese as a young boy, Zheng He became a confidant of the Chinese emperor Zhu Di, who ultimately chose him to lead one of the most powerful fleets ever assembled. Between 1405–1433, Zheng made seven voyages for China, commanding the great baochuan, the “treasure ships,” believed to have been the largest wooden ships ever launched. Zheng He’s nine-masted ships, with 400-foot long decks, sailed more than 10,000 miles from Nanjing to Africa’s Swahili coast. From the beginning, his fleet mixed business with explora-tion and diplomacy, carrying more than a million tons of Chinese silk, ceramics, and copper coinage to be exchanged for tropical spices, fragrant woods, and precious gems. Join National Geographic photographer Mike Yamashita, back by popular demand, on a photographic journey sailing the routes of Zheng He, and meet the 15th-century explorer he came to know.
Presenter: Michael Yamashita ’71, a veteran photographer for National Geographic who specializes in Asian topics and whose books include Marco Polo: A Photographer’s Journey; Mekong: A Journey of the Mother Waters; and Zheng He (to be available in fall 2006)

Location: Room 150, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street
 

Saturday, 2 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 29

Schooling in America—Is it Possible to Fix?
Join two Wesleyan alumni—one a founder of two different schools, the other a former state commissioner of education and now overseer of a major urban high school re-form initiative—as they lead an interactive exploration of the future of education in the United States. Will our schools ever be able to prepare “all children” for the kind of experience a place like Wesleyan provides? How will we fix the thousands of schools in need of educational repair, or should we? What is No Child Left Be-hind—the good, the bad, and the ugly? Don’t miss this opportunity to engage with people who are doing the work in a non-jargon, participatory workshop. You will never think about K-12 education the same way again!
Presenters: Michele Pierce ’91, cofounder of two schools and currently executive director of the Harriet Tubman Charter School, Bronx, N.Y.; Nicholas Donohue ’81, Special Master, Inner City High School, Providence, R.I. and former commissioner, Department of Education, State of New Hampshire

Location: Room 58, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street

 

Saturday, 3 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 30

Winning Customer Loyalty with Personal Touches or “Hugs”
Jack Mitchell is a master of customer service who likes to share his secrets for building long-lasting business relationships. And, he has a lot to share because he’s been a highly successful retailer since 1969 when he joined his family’s business, Ed Mitchell, Inc., in Westport, Connecticut. Since then, the business has grown into Mitchells of Westport and acquired Richards, the leading men’s clothing store in Greenwich, Connecticut. Today, Jack and his family, plus a team of loyal staff, manage both stores, enjoying record sales and intensely loyal customers. The family’s winning manner is best captured in Jack’s mantra Hug Your Customers. Join this extraordinary retailer, who has agreed to step out of his Westport store (but insists on bringing his tape measure), for a rare Saturday appearance, to offer his “deceptively simple” but winning advice on building professional relationships that last.
Presenter: John “Jack” R. Mitchell ’61, CEO and chairman of Mitchells of Westport, Richards of Greenwich, and Marshs in Huntington, Long Island. He is the author of Hug Your Customers—The Proven Way to Personalize Sales and Achieve Astounding Results and an internationally acclaimed motivational speaker. He is married to Linda Mitchell, who is the women’s buyer for Mitchells/Richards/Marshs; their four sons also hold senior positions in the family business.

Location: Room 116 Judd Hall, 207 High Street

 

Saturday, 3 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 31

Working in Hollywood
Join this conversation with some of Hollywood’s most successful alumni.
Moderator: Jeanine Basinger, Corwin-Fuller Professor of Film Studies, curator of the Cinema Archives, chair of the Film Studies Department, and a 1996 recipient of the Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching
Presenters: Paul Schiff ’81, producer of the films My Cousin Vinny and Rushmore; Bradley Whitford ’81, actor, currently appearing in the television drama, The West Wing

Location: The Goldsmith Family Cinema, Center for Film Studies, 343 Washington Terrace

 

Saturday, 3 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 32

Gamelan Workshop
Dominated by colorful, bronze percussion instruments, the gamelan ensemble features gongs, bronze and wooden xylophones, two-headed drums, a female soloist, and a male chorus. Some of the instruments date back to the 12th century in Java, an Indonesian island located between Sumatra and Bali. The music is considered a communal expression, with no single instrument separated from the whole sound of the ensemble, and is based on several melodic layers framed by the striking of gongs. Gamelan music is frequently used in Javanese ceremonies including weddings and village cleansings, and as an accompaniment for dance and puppet theater. Join us for this lively, hands-on workshop and get some real experience playing the gamelan.
Presenters: I. M. Harjito, artist-in-residence, Music Department; Darsono, visiting gamelan instructor, Music Department; Sumarsam, chair and adjunct professor, Music Department. Former gamelan students are welcome to join the workshop.

Location: World Music Hall, Center for the Arts

 

Saturday, 3:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 33

Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture
The experience of childhood has changed dramatically in recent years. Children are the targets of an ongoing barrage of advertising and marketing, and they have be-come avid consumers, with substantial buying power, definitive brand tastes, and an enthusiasm for many marketed products. How did this happen and what are the con-sequences? How does it affect children's well-being? What can parents do to help their children maintain a healthy relationship to consumer culture? Learn about sociologist Juliet Schor’s firsthand research inside advertising agencies and her pioneering study of our consumer culture.
Presenter: Juliet Schor ’75, professor of sociology, Boston College, and author of Born to Buy: The Commercialized Child and the New Consumer Culture; The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don’t Need; and The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline of Leisure
Location: Hansel Lecture Hall, Public Affairs Center (PAC), 238 Church Street

 

Saturday, 3:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 34

The Future of the Newspaper: Views From The Trenches
Journalism has never been under as much pressure as it is now. Join four news veterans for a frank discussion about how their news organizations deal with governments (in Washington and elsewhere), war coverage, credibility challenges, and intense political and market pressures.
Introduction by: Daniel Haar ’81, business and economics columnist, Hartford Courant
Moderator: Alberto Ibarguen ’66, P’97, longtime publisher of The Miami Herald and now director of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
Presenters: Ethan Bronner ’76, deputy foreign editor of The New York Times; Alan Miller ’76, Pulitzer-prize winning investigative reporter for The Los Angeles Times; David Lynch ’81, USA Today staff writer and former Beijing bureau chief
Location: Cinema, Center for the Arts

 

Saturday, 3:30 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 35

Making the Dream of Family a Reality: Current Issues in Donor Insemination
Historically donor insemination has been shrouded in secrecy and restricted to married heterosexual couples. But over the past two decades, there has been a growing movement toward disclosure and family diversity. Join Alice Ruby, who directs the nation’s only nonprofit sperm bank for a discussion of current sperm donation issues including open-identity donation and meetings between biological half-siblings. Attention will be given to legal issues for lesbians and sin-gle women, to the implications of recent regulations for gay donors, and to international trends.
Presenter: Alice Ruby ’91, executive director, The Sperm Bank of California.

Location: Kerr Lecture Hall, Hall-Atwater, Church Street (formerly Shanklin 107)
 

Saturday, 4 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 36

Lapping America: A Man, A Corvette, and the Interstates
June 29, 2006 will mark the 50th anniversary of the Dwight D. Eisenhower System of Interstate and Defense Highways, the largest public works project in history. Lapping America, published to coincide with the golden anniversary hoopla, details a 10,000-mile journey made by Bud Smith around the perimeter of the 48 states, traveling solely on the interstates. His grand lap of America, made in a ’96 Corvette in the fall of 1999, was a millennial tribute to the Interstate System. En route he planted a millennial banner in the four corners of the country and interviewed more than 100 people as to their opinions of the interstates. Neither paean nor apology for Ike’s ribbon of concrete, Lapping America seeks to put the cult of “blue highways” into a much-needed perspective. Join Bud for a bit of interstate history and the search for the perfect interstate ride, and be sure to pack your own interstate experiences.
Presenter: Claude “Bud” Smith ’66, professor of English at Ohio Northern University, is an author whose work has been variously translated into French, Danish, Swedish, Russian, and Chinese; Lapping America is his seventh book.

Location: Room 58, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street

 

Saturday, 4 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 37

Five Years Out
Alumni from the Class of 2001 have been up to all kinds of things since they left campus. Some have become teachers, joined the Peace Corps, published magazines, or sold stocks. Others are actors, directors, designers, musicians, or writers. Many are job hunting, and some are still trying to figure it all out. Join members of the class for some hardcore catching up on where life has taken them in their first five years out.
The panel will include time for discussion by alumni in attendance. The Class of 2001 welcomes members of the Class of 2006 to come hear about the first five years out.
Moderator: Louise S. Brown, associate dean of the college, dean for the Class of 2009, and adjunct lecturer in government
Presenters: Elizabeth Collins Bliss ’01, director of institutional relations, Children’s Hope Foundation, and formerly a fourth grade teacher in New York City; Matthew Bourke ’01, exploration geologist, ExxonMobil; Regan Schubel ’01, assistant director of the Annual Fund for Excellence at Wesleyan and the former driver of the Oscar Mayer Weinermobile

Location: Room 150, Exley Science Center, 265 Church Street


Saturday, 4 p.m.

Voices of Liberal Learning: WESeminar 38

Ten Years Out
Alumni from the class of 1996 have ventured off in all kinds of directions since they left campus. Some have followed traditional paths and gone to law school or medical school; some teach school and manage their own classrooms. Some analyze financial portfolios, or work as professional headhunters. Others are working journalists, landscape designers, dancers and choreographers, and professional chefs. Some 96-ers are between jobs and some are taking a little time to decide what comes next. Join members of this lively class to find out what everyone’s been up to in the ten years since they left campus.
Moderator: Michael Sciola, director, Career Resource Center
Presenters: Barret Feldman’96, visiting assistant professor of art, Wesleyan University; Jed Hoyer ’96, Assistant General Manager, Boston Red Sox; Alison Schwartz ’96, general manager of Blue Man Productions

Location: Room 210, Fisk Hall, 262 High Street