ARCHAEOLOGY PROGRAM
2014—2015

Professors: Douglas Charles, Anthropology, Chair; Clark Maines, Art and Art History; Christopher Parslow, Classical Studies; Phillip B. Wagoner, Art and Art History

Assistant Professors: Kathleen Birney, Classical Studies; Sarah Croucher, Anthropology

Departmental Advising Experts 20142015: Douglas Charles, Sarah Croucher, Clark Maines, Christopher Parslow, Phillip Wagoner

Department/Program Home Page

Department/Program Description.

Archaeology is the discipline most directly concerned with the understanding and explanation of past societies through the study of their material remains. The reconstruction of these societies through the interpretation of material culture permits archaeology to span both the prehistoric and the historic periods. While certain Archaeology Program courses originate within the program, others are cross-listed from the departments of Anthropology, Art and Art History, and Classical Civilization. Majors design their own curriculum in close consultation with their advisor according to the specific area of concentration within the discipline.

Courses for Non-Majors.

Since there are no ARCP courses with prerequisites, all of our courses are suitable for non-majors.

Admission to the Major.

To apply to become a major in archaeology, a student must have taken or be currently enrolled in either a Gateway, or a Thinking Through Archaeology course and earn a grade of B or better. Following electronic application, admission will be determined by a meeting of the ARCP faculty.

Gateway courses

  • ARCP201 Art and Archaeology of Bronze Age Mediterranean
  • ARCP202 Paleoanthropology: The Study of Human Evolution
  • ARCP204 Approaches to Archaeology
  • ARCP214 Survey of Greek Archaeology
  • ARCP215 Art and Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, 400-1100
  • ARCP223 Survey of Roman Archaeology and Art
  • ARCP225 Excavating America: Historical Archaeology of the Modern World
  • ARCP256 African Archaeology
  • ARCP268 Prehistory of North America

Thinking through Archaeology

  • ARCP234 Art and Society in Ancient Pompeii
  • ARCP244 Pyramids and Funeral Pyres: Death and the Afterlife in Greece and Egypt
  • ARCP265 Archaeological Analysis
  • ARCP285 Greek Vases as Art and Artifact
  • ARCP292 Archaeology of Food, Trade, and Power in South India
  • ARCP304 Medieval Archaeology
  • ARCP325 Middletown Materials: Archaeological Analysis
  • ARCP372 Archaeology of Death
Major Requirements.

A major in archaeology consists of at least nine different courses numbered 200 and above:

  • One Gateway course see list above
  • One Thinking Through Archaeology course - see list above
  • One course in each of the four areas - see lists below
    • Anthropology
    • Art history
    • Cassical civilization
    • Methods and theory
  • Two electives in archaeology or related disciplines
  • Senior essay/thesis tutorial (1 or 2 credits)

Anthropology

  • ARCP202 Paleoanthropology: The Study of Human Evolution
  • ARCP225 Excavating America: Historical Archaeology of the Modern World
  • ARCP250 Foragers to Farmers: Hunting and Gathering and the Development of Agriculture
  • ARCP256 African Archaeology
  • ARCP268 Prehistory of North America
  • ARCP364 Monumental Cultures of Pre-Columbian North America

Art History

  • ARCP215 The Art and Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, 400-1100
  • ARCP292 Archaeology of Food, Trade and Power in South India
  • ARCP304 Medieval Archaeology
  • ARCP380 Relic and Image: Archaeology and Social History of Indian Buddhism
  • ARCP387 Water's Past-Water's Future: A History and Archaeology of Water Use and Management

Classical Civilization

  • ARCP201 Art and Archaeology of Bronze Age Mediterranean
  • ARCP214 Survey of Greek Archaeology
  • ARCP223 Survey of Roman Archaeology and Art
  • ARCP234 Art and Society in Ancient Pompeii
  • ARCP244 Pyramids and Funeral Pyres: Death and the Afterlife in Greece and Egypt
  • ARCP253 Ancient Rome:  From Hut Village to Imperial Capital
  • ARCP290 Archaeology of Greek Cult
  • ARCP328 Roman Urban Life
  • ARCP329 Roman Villa Life

Methods and Theory

  • ARCP226 Feminist and Gender Archaeology
  • ARCP265 Archaeological Analysis
  • ARCP325 Middletown Materials: Archaeological Analysis
  • ARCP372 Archaeology of Death
  • ARCP373 Field Methods in Archaeology
  • ARCP383 Grounding the Past: Monument, Site, and Memory
Admission to the Minor.

To declare the minor, a student must achieve a grade of B or above in a designated gateway course (see list under "Admission to the Major")

Minor Requirements.

The archaeology minor requires a minimum of six credits in archaeology. These must include

  • One designated Gateway course
  • One designated Thinking through Archaeology course
  • One course in each of four areas (anthropology, classical civilization, art history, methods and theory)

For a listing of the different courses in each of these categories, please see Major Requirements.

To apply for the minor please submit a declaration to add the minor through the Major/Minor/Cert Declaration application in your student portfolio.

Study Abroad.

Study abroad is possible at a number of institutions with well-established archaeology programs, some of which include tours of archaeological sites in addition to coursework. Wesleyan students have recently participated in semesters abroad at these institutions:

  • University College London (UK)
  • St. Andrews University (Scotland, UK)
  • Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (Italy)
  • College Year in Athens (Greece)

Interested students should consult the Office of International Studies for details about transferable credit.

Capstone Experience.

All majors must write a senior honors thesis or a senior essay that involves interpretation of material remains. This may include work on objects in the archaeology and anthropology collections or research tied to a project of a Wesleyan faculty member. Students pursuing honors both in archaeology and in a second major are required to take at least one of their two required thesis tutorials in the Archaeology Program (i.e., either ARCP409 or 410).

Fieldwork.
Archaeological fieldwork, typically carried out over the summer, is an excellent way to acquire hands-on experience and training in archaeological methods and excavation techniques. It also allows students to explore the history and material culture of a region in greater depth and, in some cases, even to conduct research on primary materials from a site that can then serve as the basis for a senior thesis or capstone project. 

Fieldwork opportunities are offered both by our Wesleyan faculty as well as through a number of programs worldwide    For more information and a list of archaeological field programs, see our Fieldwork page here.  Excavation experience is strongy encouraged, and completion of an approved archaeological field school program may be substituted for the Methods and Theory requirement.

Honors.
See Capstone experience above.
Additional Information.
  • We encourage students to take the Gateway course before their chosen Thinking Through Archaeology course. However, as we have no prerequisites for entry to archaeology courses, it is possible for students to complete these requirements in reverse order.
  • With prior approval from the chair of the Archaeology Program, the methods and theory requirement may be fulfilled by academic credit from a field school program. We strongly encourage minors to gain fieldwork experience in archaeology.
  • Upon the discretion of the Archaeology chair, one nonfieldwork archaeology credit may be transferred in to cover a gateway or area requirement.
  • No more than two courses cross-listed with the student’s major will be counted toward the Archaeology minor.