CERTIFICATE IN MUSLIM STUDIES
2017—2018

Link to WesMaps Courses

More than one-fifth of the world’s population currently self-identifies as Muslim. A 2015 Pew Research Center report projects this will rise to nearly 30% by 2050. For many individuals and groups, “Muslim” is more than a marker of religion, it represents a set of contested communities; ethnicities; histories; regions and neighborhoods; politics; and artistic, literary, and musical traditions that may or may not have a recognizable connection to Islam. Despite this diversity, many hold notions of Muslim identity that act as a shared horizon of belonging or association.

Certificate students must complete six appropriately designated courses. Each course offered will carry two designations—topic and region—in order to ensure that students engage an appropriately diverse distribution of courses.
 
All courses will be listed according to one (or more) of the following topical categories:

  • Contemporary society and practice: Courses primarily concerned with the study of contemporary Muslim communities (cont)
  • Literary, artistic, and musical studies (la&m)
  • Historical inquiry (hist)

All courses will be listed according to one (or more) of the following regional categories:

  • Middle East and North Africa (MENA)
  • South, East, and Southeast Asia (SESA)
  • Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)
  • North America and Europe (NAE)

The six courses designated as appropriate for the certificate must include:

  • One gateway course (i.e., a course entirely about Muslims that serves as a way to offer an introduction to Muslim studies).
  • At least one course in each of the topical categories.
  • At least one course in three of the regional categories.
  • No more than three courses can come from one of the above categories.

These requirements endeavor to diversify the student’s exposure to disciplinary and divisional offerings in Muslim studies while allowing hir to focus on specific topics of particular interest.
 
Courses are considered appropriate for the certificate if they include at least 25% material on Muslims. Internships in appropriate organizations will be considered for credit so long as they are accompanied by a 10-page assessment of learning outcomes to be assessed by the director.

Gateway
Advanced Arabic I
Mughal India: Introduction to the Practice of Art History
Islamic Art and Architecture
Negotiating Gender in the Maghreb
Negotiating French Identity: Migration and Identity in Contemporary France
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Arab Spring and Aftermath
Social History of Islam in Africa
Islam and Muslim Cultures
Cinematic Encounters: Muslims and/in/of the West
Islamic Movements and Modernities
Orientalism: Spain and Africa
Contemporary Society and Practice (cont)
Negotiating Gender in the Maghreb
Negotiating French Identity: Migration and Identity in Contemporary France
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Arab Spring and Aftermath
Islam and Muslim Cultures
Cinematic Encounters: Muslims and/in/of the West
Islamic Movements and Modernities
Literary, Artistic, and Musical Studies (la&m)
Intermediate Arabic I
Intermediate Arabic II
Advanced Arabic I
Mughal India: Introduction to the Practice of Art History
Islamic Art and Architecture
Empire and Erotica: Twenty-three Masterworks of Indian Painting
African History and Art
Minorities in French Cinema
Music and Theater of Indonesia
India and the World: Fiction and Film About India and Globalization
Writing the War on Terror: Crafting Literary Responses to Fiction, Film, and Television after 9/11
Historical Inquiry (hist)
Introduction to History: Gandhi and the Raj
Delhi: The Past in the Present
Social History of Islam in Africa
From Jerusalem to Ground Zero: Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Sioux, and Hindu Notions of Sacredness
Religion, Science, and Empire: Crucible of a Globalized World
Orientalism: Spain and Africa
Emperor, Caliph, King: Comparing the Byzantines, Abbasids, and Carolingians
Medievals on the Move: Pilgrimage, Jihad, Crusade, and Apocalypse
Middle East and North Africa (MENA)
Intermediate Arabic I
Intermediate Arabic II
Advanced Arabic I
Islamic Art and Architecture
Negotiating Gender in the Maghreb
Negotiating French Identity: Migration and Identity in Contemporary France
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Arab Spring and Aftermath
Islam and Muslim Cultures
Cinematic Encounters: Muslims and/in/of the West
Islamic Movements and Modernities
From Jerusalem to Ground Zero: Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Sioux, and Hindu Notions of Sacredness
Religion, Science, and Empire: Crucible of a Globalized World
Orientalism: Spain and Africa
Emperor, Caliph, King: Comparing the Byzantines, Abbasids, and Carolingians
Medievals on the Move: Pilgrimage, Jihad, Crusade, and Apocalypse
Writing the War on Terror: Crafting Literary Responses to Fiction, Film, and Television after 9/11
South, East, and Southeast Asia (SESA)
Mughal India: Introduction to the Practice of Art History
Islamic Art and Architecture
Empire and Erotica: Twenty-three Masterworks of Indian Painting
Introduction to History: Gandhi and the Raj
Delhi: The Past in the Present
Islam and Muslim Cultures
Cinematic Encounters: Muslims and/in/of the West
Islamic Movements and Modernities
Religion, Science, and Empire: Crucible of a Globalized World
Music and Theater of Indonesia
India and the World: Fiction and Film About India and Globalization
Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)
African History and Art
Social History of Islam in Africa
North America and Europe (NAE)
Islam and Muslim Cultures
Cinematic Encounters: Muslims and/in/of the West
Islamic Movements and Modernities
Orientalism: Spain and Africa
Minorities in French Cinema
Medievals on the Move: Pilgrimage, Jihad, Crusade, and Apocalypse
Writing the War on Terror: Crafting Literary Responses to Fiction, Film, and Television after 9/11

Interested students should contact Peter Gottschalk at pgottschalk@wesleyan.edu.