Summer Session 2018 Courses 

Courses subject to change without notice. Courses also appear in WesMaps. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Summer Session courses. All courses are 1 Wesleyan credit, with the exception of Chemistry 152 (Lab) which is worth .25 credit.

SUMMER SESSION I: MAY 30 - JUNE 28

DIVISION I - Arts and Humanities

ENGL205/THEA210: Shakespeare Sam Fallon

  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    This course is an introduction to the drama of William Shakespeare. We will read plays representing the major dramatic genres--comedy, history, and tragedy--and study them in the context of the historical transformations that shaped early modern England, from the Protestant Reformation to New World colonization. Our guiding focus will be on drama as a form of skepticism. How, we will ask, do Shakespeare's plays force us to question the legitimacy of political rule, the categories of race and gender, and the nature of the self? How do they imagine the challenge of knowing, trusting, and loving others? And how do they wrestle with the dangers of doubting too much?

ENGL271: Distinguished Writers/New Voices (with Writer's Conference) Anne Greene

  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    The writing exercises in this course give students an introduction to nonfiction writing in several forms, both literary and journalistic. Talks by visiting writers in other genres--fiction, poetry, or drama--offer students a broader sense of writers' techniques and an introduction to interesting contemporary work. Students will attend lectures and readings by the visiting writers, meet in classes and workshop sessions, and work on short writing assignments.

DIVISION II - Social and Behavioral Sciences

GOVT311: US Foreign Policy Douglas Foyle
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    This course provides a survey of the content and formulation of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the period after World War II.  It evaluates the sources of American foreign policy including the international system, societal factors, government processes, and individual decision makers.  The course begins with a consideration of major trends in U.S. foreign policy after World War II. With a historical base established, the focus turns to the major institutions and actors in American foreign policy. The course concludes with an examination of the challenges and opportunities that face current U.S. decision makers. A significant component of the course is the intensive discussion of specific foreign policy decisions.

    No prior knowledge of U.S. foreign policy or international politics is assumed other than what might be gathered from keeping up with the current events.

ECON127: Principles of Accounting Martin Gosman
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ECON
    Prerequisites: ECON101 or ECON110
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    In this course, students learn how accountants define assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses and where those items are placed in firms' balance sheets and income statements. The purposes and limitations of these two financial statements as well as the statement of cash flows are considered. Students gain an understanding of the accounting numbers that appear in financial statements for inventories, depreciation, and leases; the choices given to firms in their reporting of those items; and how the use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Firms' filings of financial statements and note disclosures with the SEC are examined throughout the course.

DIVISION III - Natural Sciences and Mathematics

COMP112: Introduction to Programming (with Python) Jim Lipton
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MATH
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Syllabus: TBA

    In this course students will be introduced to programming, using the Python language, from scratch. No background at all is required. Students will acquire basic coding skills that will enable them to continue with more advanced programming courses, or to learn about more advanced applications in many fields. This would include data analysis applications or coding web and phone apps and games. In this course we will cover basic program construction techniques including the use of function definitions loops and classes. We will work towards a final graphical game project using a popular graphical user interface called TkInter. Students may propose alternative graphical project ideas. The choice of programming language, Python, is based on a number of considerations: it is one of the most widely used languages in the world today. Many resources (additional packages) are available for Python for web development, machine learning, data science, graphics, map and GPS applications, games, interfaces to Google, Facebook and Twitter. This is a "hands-on" course: students will spend close to half of class time writing or completing programs in class, with the instructor giving assistance and making comments one-on-one. There is no better way to learn how to code than by doing it.

E&ES199: Introduction to Environmental Science Suzanne O'Connell

CHEM141: Introductory Chemistry* Andrea Roberts

  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    This course emphasizes rigorous descriptive reasoning. While intended for students with little or no previous background in chemistry, the course is taught at a relatively high level. The topical coverage emphasizes the relationships between electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and the physical properties of the elements and their compounds.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

CHEM152: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory* Andrea Roberts 
note: this lab will span over Session I and Session II
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    This course takes place over both Summer Sessions and is worth .25 credits total.

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

PSYC105: Foundations of Contemporary Psychology Steven Stemler
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS PSYC
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Syllabus: TBA

    This course will include an introductory-level presentation of ideas and research findings in the major areas of psychology. It will serve as both preparation for upper-level courses in psychology and as a valuable contribution to students' liberal arts education. This course will help students discover what psychology is and what psychologists do. Not only will students learn the basic content of psychology, but the course should help them to think critically about such everyday issues as, In what ways are we like other humans, and how do we differ? What do babies perceive and think? Why do we dream? Content areas include history of psychology, methods of psychological research, biological basis of human behavior, motivation and emotions, learning and memory, sensation and perception, cognitive and social development, personality, intelligence, and psychopathology.

SUMMER SESSION II: JULY 2 - AUGUST 1, 2018

DIVISION I - Arts and Humanities

ARST190: Digital Art Christopher Chenier

  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ART
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    SyllabusClick here to view a previous syllabus for this course

    Location: TBD
    ScheduleTBD

    This experience will introduce students to the digital arts, an area of creative practice encompassing computer-based art from GIFS and graphics to cutting edge digital fabrication tools. While developing the critical and methodological tools to engage problems in our digital culture, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to create and communicate digitally. Sessions will emphasize the ways software is used for project development, prototyping, and experimentation. Most of our time will be spend in Adobe Creative Cloud. The core elements of CC will be covered through workshops in image editing, graphics, layout, and type. Translating digital files into physical objects, students will work with a laser cutter, large format inket printers, and a CNC mill.

ENGL370: The Graphic Novel William Eggers

  • Click for Course Description

     Gen Ed Area Dept
    Prerequisites
    Grading Mode: TBA
    Syllabus: TBA

    Description Coming Soon!

 

FILM458: Visual Storytelling: Screenwriting Mirko Rucnov 
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA FILM
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    Since watching movies (good ones) is so easy and pleasurable, screenwriting is a medium that everyone's uncle thinks they can do. But anyone who has had to read an amateur screenplay knows different. This is a writing course that will start from ground zero: separating the screenplay from other forms, e.g., the play and the novel, and grounding students in visual language as the basis of the medium. How do we write in pictures?

FILM259: The Art of the Personal Essay Meg Weisberg 
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

DIVISION II - Social and Behavioral Sciences

GOVT155: International Politics Guilio Gallarotti 
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

DIVISION III - Natural Sciences and Mathematics

CIS/WRCT150: Academic Writing in the Sciences: The Sixth Extinction John Cooley 
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CIS
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    Elizabeth Kolbert’s “The Sixth Extinction,” like many other popular science works, suggests that we are experiencing a contemporary mass extinction, and that it is caused by humans.  Are we?  Is so, are we responsible?  This writing-intensive course uses primary sources and a Write-to-Learn model to explore the roots of extinction.  Projects involve numerous short writing assignments in the style of evidence-based STEM writing.  The complete topic and assignment schedule is to be found on Moodle.

    This course brings together a variety of sources including popular articles and scientific papers, with the goal of understanding the science behind the writing.  Class periods will generally have two pre-reading assignments on related topics but drawn from different genres or disciplines (e.g., paper from a scientific journal might be paired with a popular magazine article), and each class will have an associated brief writing assignment.  Along the way, we will examine the rhetorical conventions of different academic disciplines and learn key skills such as how to structure writing for maximum effect and how to be an effective peer reviewer. The course schedule is intensive (for me and for you), but since each writing assignment is worth only a few points, you can afford to make mistakes without really affecting your grade.  Plan ahead—you must attend each class, each class will have an assignment, and no extensions will be given for routine matters.  Because everybody involved has other commitments, or because life sometimes intervenes in inconvenient ways, talk to me as soon as conflicts arise.

    Other than “The Sixth Extinction,” the readings you’ll need will be available on Moodle.  You’ll also need access to a recent version of Microsoft Word, and if you have a laptop, bring it to class.  The “Course Bibliography”contains a number of references that can help you improve your writing, though they are not required.

BIOL155: Tiny Organisms with a Big Effect: The Microbiome Sarah Kopac 
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM BIOL
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    With the advent of advanced sequencing technology, we are able to characterize the microflora that lives on and inside of multicellular organisms, including humans. It follows that there are still many unknowns with respect to the function and dynamics of relationships between bacterial communities and their hosts. These bacterial communities, colonizing humans and other organisms with millions of microbes, has captured the interest of the public. Popular news outlets have made the disparate claims that the right human microbiome can act as a panacea and the wrong microbiome is such a calamity that it can destroy an individual’s health. This course will look at the true nature of the microbiome, to the extent that current research has revealed. We will discuss both normal and abnormal bacterial community compositions and any related disease states. Similarly, we will cover changes in microbiome composition over time and with respect to host development. In class we will also consider the microbiomes of other organisms and how the presence and composition of the microbiome relates to disease states and/or life history.

CHEM152: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory* Andrea Roberts 
note: this lab will span over Session I and Session II
  • Click for Course Description

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM Chem
    Prerequisites: None
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Syllabus: TBA

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    *this course is not offered to PreCollege students.

PSYC357: Language and Thought Anna Shusterman