Summer 2003

ARTS 668 (DCMV CP)
Choreographic Improvisation

Russell III,George S.

06/23/2003 - 08/05/2003
Tuesday & Thursday 01:30 PM - 04:30 PM

Schoenberg Dance Studio

Choreographic improvisation, a technique developed by Richard Bull, Cynthia Novack, and Peentz Dubble, allows dancers to improvise dances according to the principles of set choreography. With this technique, the dancer/choreographer can approach choreographic principles such as space, phrasing, theme and variation, movement quality, image, and gesture through improvisation, thus creating spontaneous choreography in performance. The technique can also be used to evaluate and improve any kind of improvisation, to coach dancers, and to develop set choreography.

The text for this course will be Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art by Stephen Nachmanovitch. Students will use writing and in-class discussion to make sense of the reading, to develop clarity in their dance analysis, and to identify their own weaknesses, strengths, and interests as improvisers. Practical goals and strategies for developing skills will then be devised. Composition assignments will develop the ability to create and revise structures for generating improvisational dances. Grades will be based on contribution to group process - verbally and in movement; short written assignments, including a journal which bears witness to the person's inner process and responses to the reading; and a final project creating structures for group improvisations and directing each other in the dances. Dancers of all technique levels are welcome in this class. Students with little or no dance training should contact the instructor at grusselldc@earthlink.net for an interview prior to registering.

Course will meet at 156 High Street on June 24 & 26.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:

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