Fall 2003

HUMS 640 (AMST)
Contemporary African American Narratives of Slavery

Rushdy,Ashraf H.A.

09/08/2003 - 12/13/2003
Monday 06:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Fisk Hall 305

This course will primarily be concerned with examining in some detail the recent proliferation of African American fiction about slavery. After a preliminary discussion of some notable antebellum slave narratives, we will study eight contemporary "narratives of slavery" and define the three most notable forms of representing slavery in contemporary fiction: 1) "Neo-Slave narratives"--that is, novels that are contemporary rewritings of antebellum slave narrative forms and conventions; 2) "Palimpsest narratives," which are novels set in late 20th-century America but tracing modern social relations within an explicit representation of the slave experience; and 3) historical novels set in the antebellum South.


Ashraf Rushdy (B.A., M.A. University of Alberta; Ph.D. University of Cambridge) is professor of English and African American studies. He is author of Remembering Generations: Race and Family in Contemporary African American Fiction (University of North Carolina Press, 2001); Neo-Slave Narratives: Studies in the Social Logic of a Literary Form (Oxford University Press, 1999); The Empty Garden: The Subject of Late Milton (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992), and more than 35 articles and essays. Click here for more information about Ashraf Rushdy.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:

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