Summer 2003

MTHS 639
Statistics for Social Sciences

Porter,Stephen Robert

06/23/2003 - 08/05/2003
Monday & Wednesday 06:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Science Tower 74

Statistical analyses of social data are the basis of much public policy debate, from welfare reform to school vouchers to the use of standardized testing, and the tools for producing or analyzing statistics are increasingly needed in the workplace. This course will cover the basic statistics used in quantitative analysis, the applied aspects of the research process, and will study the theoretical dimensions of statistics to explore how statistical analysis can be used in the social sciences. Topics include the visual display of numbers, descriptive statistics, distributions, probability and random variables, and hypothesis testing. While many statistics courses focus on formula memorization and the solving of problem sets, this course takes a different approach by emphasizing hands-on analysis of data in order to understand statistical concepts and their theoretical foundations. There will be some use of formulas, and the completion of assignments will require only simple algebra.

Geared toward those with conceptual interests in the compilation of statistics but no statistical knowledge, the course grade will be based on several short papers that require description and analysis of datasets. The course will be taught in a computer lab and will use the student version of SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences-one of the most widely used and powerful statistical software programs). This easy-to-use software program has a graphical interface that allows the user to analyze data by simply pointing and clicking. In order to successfully complete assignments, students should have access to a personal computer outside of class.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:

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