Spring 2010

SCIE 624
The Psychology of Psychosis

Garrett,Noel R

01/16/2010 - 01/31/2010
Note: Special Schedule 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Public Affairs Center 422


Special Schedule: Saturday - Monday, January 16-18; Saturday & Sunday, January 30-31

Is "madness" as old as humankind? In ancient writings, we find no descriptions of an insanity that arises in adolescence, causes hallucinations and delusions, and eventually goes away, but often recurs—the hallmark of the symptoms of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders—the "psychoses." Are we using contemporary standards and descriptions that would fit modern diagnoses?

Historical observations provide no ancient description of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. However, the Father of Medicine, Hippocrates (460-377 B.B.), described other forms of madness such as the "sacred disease" (epilepsy), mania, and melancholia (depression). Attributed to the brain, as opposed to possession by the gods, Hippocrates believed madness was due to "abnormal moisture" of the brain. Once adequately described clinically in 1809, the disease seems to have become visible all over the Western world.

Many theories to explain "madness" have evolved through time. Three remain prominent today, and are more commonly known as the biopsychosocial model: (i) the stress-induction theory, (ii) the social-cultural theory, and (iii) the biological-disease theory.

This course is designed to address early accounts of psychosis and to analyze historical views of insanity and its treatment as the origins of modern considerations in mental disorders. The course is comprised of three units 1) an understanding of "madness" through time, 2) current views and approaches to treatment, and 3) personal accounts of survivors and families.

Sources to be studied include Torrey, E.F., Surviving Schizophrenia: A Manual for Families, Consumers, and Providers; Gottesman, Irving I., Schizophrenia Genesis: The Origins of Madness; Deveson, A., Tell me I'm here: One family's experience of Schizophrenia; and Maddux, J.E., & Winstead, B.A., Psychopathology: Foundations for a contemporary perspective. A course packet will also be available, which will include first-person accounts and clinical case studies of survivors and families, as well as source articles and other clinical materials providing historical views.

Grades will be based on three short response-style papers, and a long-form, final research paper, as well as class participation.

Course tuition: $2022.

Enrollment is limited to 18 students. This course is not open to auditors.

A syllabus for this course is available at:
Course Syllabus

Immersion courses are worth three units of credit and are academically as rigorous as a regular term course, only the class meetings are compressed into a very short time. Students interested in immersion courses should be aware that the syllabus usually requires that students prepare for up to a month prior to the first class meeting and complete assignments in the weeks following the course. Please click here for more information about immersion courses.


Noel Garrett (B.S., Duquesne University; M.A., D.Phil, The New School for Social Research) is dean for the class of 2011.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:
E.F. Torry, SURVIVING SCHIZOPHRENIA: A MANUAL FOR FAMILIES, CONSUMERS, AND PROVIDERS, (Harper Collins), Paperback

Irving Gittesman, SCHIZOPHRENIA GENESIS: THE ORIGINS OF MADNESS, (W.H. Freeman and Co.) Paperback

K. Snyder, ME, MYSELF, AND THEM: A FIRSTHAND ACCOUNT OF ONE YOUNG PERSON'S EXPERIENCE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, (Oxford University Press), Paperback

A. Deveson, TELL ME I'M HERE: ONE FAMILY'S EXPERIENCE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, (Penguin Books), Paperback

L. Schiller and A. Bennett, THE QUIET ROOM: A JOURNEY OUT OF THE TORMENT OF MADNESS, (Warner Books), Paperback

Joanne Greenberg, I NEVER PROMISED YOU A ROSE GARDEN, (Signet), Paperback

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