Summer 2009
Fully Enrolled

SCIE 635
The Connecticut River: Natural History and Human Imprints

Hammerson,Geoffrey

08/03/2009 - 08/07/2009
Monday-Friday 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Science Tower 139

The Connecticut River harbors a great diversity of plants and animals: bald eagles, herons, and other waterbirds; dozens of fish species, ranging from darters and killifishes to shad and Atlantic salmon; hundreds of species of aquatic insects, mollusks, crustaceans, and other invertebrates; and a rich marsh and riparian flora. The river is important to people as well and has been a focal area of human activity throughout history. Most of these activities affect wildlife and plants. The goal of this field course is to explore the relationships among plants, wildlife, people, and the river. Our field studies focus on the tidal freshwater marshes, floodplain forests, and the riverine and riparian wildlife along the lower Connecticut River. We also consider the impact of the major cultural imprints along the river, including dams, power generating plants, and water treatment facilities.

This course entails a substantial amount of walking, wading, and canoeing/kayaking. Participants must be capable of prolonged physical exertion and tolerant of a lack of comfort facilities during field trips lasting several hours.

Course requirements include daily reports that detail our class field studies in written and graphic form. Assignments emphasize objective observational procedures and the reporting of first-hand field observations in a scientifically useful manner.

Our field studies entail a substantial amount of walking, wading, and canoeing/kayaking. Participants must be capable of prolonged physical exertion and tolerant of a lack of comfort facilities during field trips lasting several hours.

Important note: Class participants must provide their own kayak (preferred) or canoe, paddle, and personal flotation device (life jacket) for use during class field trips, and students must transport these items to our field trip sites. Students who do not own this equipment, or who cannot borrow it, must make their own arrangements to rent it from a local kayak dealer.

Course tuition: $2022

Enrollment is limited to 14 students. This course is not open to auditors.

A syllabus for this course is available at:
Course Syllabus


Geoffrey Hammerson (B.S. University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. University of Colorado, Boulder) is a research zoologist at NatureServe and is author of more than 70 reports and publications, most recently, The conservation status of the world's reptiles (Biological Conservation, 2013, with M. Bohm et al.) and Rapid assessment of plant and animal vulnerability to climate change (in Wildlife Conservation in a Changing Climate (University of Chicago Press, 2012, with Young et al.) Click here to read an article about Geoff and his GLS courses.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Field Studies

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 14

Texts to purchase for this course:
Geoffrey Hammerson, CONNECTICUT WILDLIFE: BIODIVERSITY, NATURAL HISTORY, AND CONSERVATION (University Press of New England), Paperback

Connecticut River Watershed Council, THE CONNECTICUT RIVER BOATING GUIDE: SOURCE TO SEA, 3rd edition (Globe Pequot Press), Paperback

READING MATERIALS ARE AVAILABLE AT BROAD STREET BOOKS, 45 BROAD STREET, MIDDLETOWN, 860-685-7323 Order your books online

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