Summer 2008
Fully Enrolled

SOCS 627
"Ten Photographs that Shook the World": Technologies of Historical Memory

Tucker,Jennifer

06/23/2008 - 08/01/2008
Tuesday & Thursday 01:30 PM - 04:30 PM

Public Affairs Center 422

Special Schedule: One-week immersion, August 6-10 (Monday-Friday) 9:00 am to 5:00 pm



What makes a photograph iconic? What photographs have been successful in influencing social and political change, and why? What impact have television, magazines, documentary film, and new digital media had on the photographic visualization of world events? What moral and ethical issues are raised by photojournalism? What is the proper role for photography in a modern democracy?

Using the framework of ten iconic photographs throughout history, the course provides a historical overview of developments in photography as well as photography theory. We will take a broad look at the social meanings and functions of photography and the impact and historical significance of visual evidence and visual persuasion. Issues to be touched on in readings and discussions include photography and human and civil rights, concepts of privacy, historical methods, and the impact of digitalization of images on the practice and perceptions of photojournalism. Though the class is primarily focused on photographic icons in the U.S. and Western Europe, we will also look at and discuss photographic icons originating and circulating in other parts of the globe.

A core text will be Vicki Goldberg's The Power of Photography: How Photographs Changed Our Lives. Other readings will include Susan Sontag, On Regarding the Pain of Others and On Photography; Raphael Samuel, Theatres of Memory; Geoffrey Batchen's recent study of photography and genocide; Terry Barrett, Criticizing Photographs: An Introduction to Understanding Images; Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography; Walter Benjamin and Hannah Arendt (eds), Illuminations; and Denise Chong, The Girl in the Picture: The Story of Kim Phuc, the Photograph, and the Vietnam War.


Jennifer Tucker (B.A., Stanford University; M. Phil., Cambridge University; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University) is associate professor of history, science in society, and feminist and gender studies. She has published numerous essays on science, photography, and historical interpretation and is the author of Nature Exposed: Photography as an Eye Witness in Victorian Science (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005). In 2008 she is convening a multi-disciplinary workshop on "Photography and Historical Interpretation" for a special theme issue of the History and Theory journal. Among her current research projects is a monograph, Making Social Facts Visible: Photography, Medicine, and Humanitarian Campaigns in British Aid Organizations, 1880-1960. Click here for more information about Jennifer Tucker.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:
Denise Chong, THE GIRL IN THE PICTURE (Penguin), Paperback

James Elkins, PHOTOGRAPHY THEORY (Routledge), Paperback

Vicki Goldberg, POWER OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HOW PHOTOGRAPHS CHANGED OUR LIVES (Abbeville Press), Paperback

Robert Hariman & John Lacaites, NO CAPTION NEEDED: ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHS, PUBLIC CULTURE, AND LIBERAL DEMOCRACY (University of Chicago Press), Paperback

Jacob Riis, HOW THE OTHER HALF LIVES (W.W. Norton), Paperback

Susan Sontag, REGARDING THE PAIN OF OTHERS (Picador), Paperback

David Levi Strauss, BETWEEN THE EYES: PHOTOGRAPHY AND POLITICS (Aperture), Paperback

READING MATERIALS ARE AVAILABLE AT BROAD STREET BOOKS, 45 BROAD STREET, MIDDLETOWN, 860-685-7323 Order your books online

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