Fall 2006

SOCS 636
The Study of Black Folks: African American Studies Then and Now

Rushdy,Ashraf H.A.

09/11/2006 - 12/16/2006
Monday 06:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Fisk Hall 314

In this course, we will look at a series of texts that help us define the origins of and the most recent developments in African American Studies. In the first half of the course, we will begin by looking carefully at what is usually considered the formative text in the study of Black life and culture--DuBois' Souls of Black Folk--and then move on to explore the ways that African American history can be differently viewed through the lenses of Black women's experiences, working class lives, and the law. We will then examine how institutionalized academics (at Howard University) and organic intellectuals (Black women singing the blues) expressed and interpreted the contested terrain of "Black culture" in the first half of the 20th century. We will conclude the course by reading a series of books in the disciplines of various social sciences, including economics, public policy studies, anthropology, women's studies, and critical race theory.

Our readings include: Carnoy, Martin, Faded Dreams: The Politics and Economics of Race in America; Crenshaw, Kimberle, et. al., Eds., Critical Race Theory: The Key Writings That Inspired the Movement; Davis, Angela Y., Blues Legacies and Black Feminism; DuBois, W.E.B., Writings; Goldfield, Michael, The Color of Politics: Race and the Mainsprings of American Politics; Gordon-Reed, Annette, Ed., Race on Trial: Law and Justice in American History; Hine, Darlene Clark, and Kathleen Thompson, A Shining Thread of Hope: The History of Black Women in America; Holloway, Jonathan Scott, Confronting the Veil: Abram Harris, Jr., E. Franklin Frazier, and Ralph Bunche, 1919--1941; Mullings, Leith, On Our Own Terms: Race, Class, and Gender in the Lives of African American Women; Scott, Daryl Michael, Contempt and Pity: Social Policy and the Image of the Damaged Black Psyche, 1880?1996.

Assignments for this course include three essays: two short (4--6 pages), and one long (8--10 page).

A syllabus for this course is available at:
http://www.wesleyan.edu/masters/courses/Fall_2006/Course%20Syllabi/syb_socs636.html


Ashraf Rushdy (B.A., M.A. University of Alberta; Ph.D. University of Cambridge) is professor of English and African American studies. He is author of Remembering Generations: Race and Family in Contemporary African American Fiction (University of North Carolina Press, 2001); Neo-Slave Narratives: Studies in the Social Logic of a Literary Form (Oxford University Press, 1999); The Empty Garden: The Subject of Late Milton (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992), and more than 35 articles and essays. Click here for more information about Ashraf Rushdy.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:
Martin Carnoy, FADED DREAMS: THE POLITICS AND ECONOMICS OF RACE IN AMERICA (Cambridge University Press), Paperback

Kimberle Crenshaw, CRITICAL RACE THEORY: THE KEY WRITINGS THAT INSPIRED THE MOVEMENT (New Press), Paperback

Angela Davis, BLUES LEGACIES AND BLACK FEMINISM (Vintage), Paperback

W.E.B. Dubois, WRITINGS (Library of America), Paperback

Michael Goldfield, THE COLOR OF POLITICS: RACE AND THE MAINSPRINGS OF AMERICAN POLITICS (The New Press), Paperback

Annette Gordon-Reed, RACE ON TRIAL: LAW AND JUSTICE IN AMERICAN HISTORY (Oxford University Press), Paperback

Darlene Hine, A SHINING THREAD OF HOPE: THE HISTORY OF BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICA (Broadway Books), Paperback

Leith Mullings, ON OUR OWN TERMS: RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER IN THE LIVES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN (Routledge), Paperback

Daryl Michael Scott, CONTEMPT AND PITY: SOCIAL POLICY AND THE IMAGE OF THE DAMAGED BLACK PSYCHE, 1880-1996 (University of North Carolina), Paperback

Jonathan Scott Holloway, CONFRONTING THE VEIL: ABRAM HARRIS, JR., E. FRANKLIN FRAZIER, AND RALPH BUNCHE, 1919-1941 (University of North Carolina Press), Paperback

READING MATERIALS AVAILABLE AT BROAD STREET BOOKS, 45 BROAD STREET, MIDDLETOWN, 860-685-7323

OPTIONAL TEXTS:

Lee Baker, FROM SAVAGE TO NEGRO: ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF RACE, 1896-1954 (University of California Press), Paperback

Jacqueline Goldsby, A SPECTACULAR SECRET: LYNCHING IN AMERICAN LIFE AND LITERATURE (University of Chicago Press), Paperback

John Jackson, REAL BLACK: ADVENTURES IN RACIAL SINCERITY (University of Chicago Press), Paperback

Manning Marable, THE NEW BLACK RENAISSANCE (Paradigm), Paperback

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