Spring 2007

SOCS 636
The Black Sixties: From Civil Rights to Black Power

Rushdy,Ashraf H.A.

01/22/2007 - 05/05/2007
Wednesday 06:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Fisk Hall 314

In this course, we will explore the development of African American political activism and political theory from 1960 to 1972, with particular focus on student movements in these years. We will familiarize ourselves with the history of political activism and agitation for civil rights and social equality during the sixties by tracing the formation of specific organizations, especially the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Black Panther Party (BPP), and tracing the changes in their political agendas. Overall, we will try to get a sense of the contours of the sixties by analyzing historical, political, and autobiographical texts from this period of American and African American history.

Readings will be drawn from: Breines, Wini, Community and Organization in the New Left, 1962-1968; Brown, Elaine, A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story; Carson, Clayborne, In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s; Carson, Clayborne, et. al., Eds., The Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader, Clarke, John Henrik, Ed., Malcolm X: The Man and His Times; Foner, Philip, Ed., The Black Panthers Speak; Hilliard, David, This Side of Glory: The Autobiography of David Hilliard and the Story of the Black Panther Party; Ture, Kwame and Charles Hamilton, Black Power: The Politics of Liberation; Van Deburg, William, New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975.

There are two forms of assignments for this course: response papers (one page to two pages) geared to the reading assignments, and four essays: one short (4-6 page), non-graded essay for my information; two short, graded essays; and one long (8-10 page) essay or research paper. The course grade will be based on several factors: a consideration of the overall achievement and degree of improvement over the course of the marked essays, the quality of the unmarked reading assignments, attendance, and participation.

A syllabus for this course is available at:
http://www.wesleyan.edu/masters/courses/Spring_2007/Spring_2007_Syllabi/syb_socs636.html


Ashraf Rushdy (B.A., M.A. University of Alberta; Ph.D. University of Cambridge) is professor of English and African American studies. He is author of Remembering Generations: Race and Family in Contemporary African American Fiction (University of North Carolina Press, 2001); Neo-Slave Narratives: Studies in the Social Logic of a Literary Form (Oxford University Press, 1999); The Empty Garden: The Subject of Late Milton (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992), and more than 35 articles and essays. Click here for more information about Ashraf Rushdy.


ENROLLMENT INFORMATION

Consent of Instructor Required: No

Format: Seminar

Level: GLSP Credits: 3 Enrollment Limit: 18

Texts to purchase for this course:
Elaine Brown, A TASTE OF POWER: A BLACK WOMAN'S STORY (Doubleday), Paperback

Clayborne Carson, IN STRUGGLE: SNCC AND THE BLACK AWAKENING OF THE 1960S (Harvard University Press), Paperback

Clayborne Carson, THE EYES ON THE PRIZE CIVIL RIGHTS READER (Penguin), Paperback

John Henrik Clarke, MALCOLM X: THE MAN AND HIS TIMES (Africa World Press), Paperback

Philip Foner, THE BLACK PANTHERS SPEAK (Da Capo Press), Paperback

David Hilliard, THIS SIDE OF GLORY: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF DAVID HILLIARD AND THE STORY OF THE BLACK PANTHER PARTY (Lawrence and Hill), Paperback

Kwame Ture, BLACK POWER: THE POLITICS OF LIBERATION IN AMERICA (Vintage), Paperback

William Van Deburg, NEW DAY IN BABYLON: THE BLACK POWER MOVEMENT AND AMERICAN CULTURE, 1965-1975 (University of Chicago Press), Paperback

READING MATERIALS AVAILABLE AT BROAD STREET BOOKS, 45 BROAD STREET, MIDDLETOWN, 860-685-7323

Please Note: A required course packet is available for purchase at PIP Printing, 179 Main Street, Middletown, (860) 644-9001. Packets may be ordered online at www.pip.com.

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