Events in Usdan

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

05:00 pm - 07:00 pm

Annual Dr. Cynthia Novack Lecture (in Memoriam): Dr. Rebecca Rossen '90 - Uneasy Duets

Uneasy Duets: Contemporary American Dances about the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Thursday, January 29, 2015

09:00 am - 10:00 am

Sustainability Advisory Group for Environmental Stewardship (SAGES) January Meeting

Usdan 110 (Andersen Meeting Room)

Thursday, January 29, 2015

09:00 am - 12:30 pm

Dr. Saundra McGuire: Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is the Key!

Open to all faculty and graduate students: 21st Century students come to college with widely varying academic skills, approaches to learning, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on achieving high grades, but are not willing to invest much time or effort in learning. This session will focus on the importance of helping students acquire simple, but effective learning strategies based on cognitive science principles, by engaging in interactive reflection activities to experience strategies that significantly improve learning.
Please RSVP to Janice Naegele, CFCD@wesleyan.edu.

Usdan 108 (Taylor Meeting Room)

Thursday, January 29, 2015

09:00 am - 07:00 pm

Tom Manely

Tom has a revolving set of merchandise. He may be bringing jewelry and accessories, or clothing and leather goods. Check it out in Usdan.

Usdan Vendor F1

Friday, January 30, 2015

08:00 pm - 01:00 am

Contra Dance

Fayerweather 202 (Beckham Hall)

Monday, February 02, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Ali Behdad, UCLA

The Tourist, The Collector, and the Curator: On the Life and Afterlives of Ottoman Era Photography

Focusing on the tourist albums in the Pierre de Gigord Collection held at the Getty Research Institute, this talk addresses the question of mobility through reflections on three moments in the life and afterlives of images produced by commercial photographers in Istanbul in the second half of nineteenth century, arguing that these images, both in the context of their production and collection by European tourists in the nineteenth century and their current afterlives as collectable objects or archival materials, are inscribed in, and thus legible, in terms of the geo-political distinctions, economic interests, and cultural assumptions about the Middle East and its people. Far from being the unique and personal expressions of individual tourists or collectors, the Gigord albums are marked by a visual regularity and consistency that is born of an Orientalist vision of Ottoman society.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Friday, February 06, 2015

01:00 pm - 04:30 pm

Finance - Theory and Applications: A Conversation with Alumni

Usdan 108 (Taylor Meeting Room)

Monday, February 09, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Professor Enda Duffy, UCSB
Rush: Adrenaline, Stress, and Modernist Velocity

Enda Duffy is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at UC Santa Barbara, where he co-directs COMMA, the Center on Modernism, Materialism, Aesthetics in the English Dept. He earned his undergraduate degree form the National University of Ireland, Dublin and his PhD from Harvard. Before Santa Barbara, he taught at Reed College and at Wesleyan University. He is the author of The Subaltern Ulysses (Minnesota, 1996) and The Speed Handbook: Velcocity, Pleasure, Modernism (Duke, 2009), which won the Modernist Studies Book Prize as the best book in Modernist studies, 2010. He coedited Joyce, Benjamin and Magical Urbanism, in the European Joyce Studies Series in 2011, and has edited editions of Ulysses and the short stories of Catherine Mansfield. He is at work on two books, one a people's history of Irish literature, the other a study of human energy in modern writing.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Monday, February 16, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Professor Jay R Scheib, MIT

The Flight out of Naturalism and into Live Cinema

Everywhere, a thirst for the Real, for an ensnaring Reality that transcends the theater in space, time and action testifies to a craving for experiences that near the actual cruelties inherent in our own Real lives and the lives of others. This desire for something of an actual experience in the face of so much fiction masquerading as fact, is tangible. Like an itch that only immersive theater, embedded journalists, or all-star-wrestling (Barthes) could scratch. My intention in making this foray to the heart of Naturalism was to exit it. The degree to which technology interferes or enhances our ability to perceive narrative realities as real reality on the stage, comprises, by and large, the spectrum of my research as a playwright, director, sceneographer, and technologist. I entered naturalism in order to leave it. And so my Flight out of Naturalism as a formal consideration has given way to LIVE CINEMA. This talk discusses that process of ten years.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Monday, February 23, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Professor Mark Slobin, Wesleyan

Inventing a Musical Metropolis: Detroit, 1940s-60s

My hometown, Detroit, changed from sleepy waterway crossroads to "capital of the 20th century" in record time, starting in 1910. Huge numbers of Europeans, white southerners, and African Americans converged on the city for work in the auto industry. All this massive mobility meant that everyone had to improvise a new urban life, including music, both the immigrants and the emerging set of corporations and city planners at the top. The product itself, the automobile, assured that mobility would be literally the driving force for constant change, pushing the city into rapid decline already by the 1960s, so the storyline is incredibly compressed.

The talk focuses on the intense interactivity between the mainstream managers and the subcultures, with attention to my own positioning as a 1943-born Detroiter in the Jewish and classical music communities. Spatiality issues are central to this ongoing research.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Thursday, February 26, 2015

09:00 am - 10:00 am

Sustainability Advisory Group for Environmental Stewardship (SAGES) February Meeting

Usdan 108 (Taylor Meeting Room)

Friday, February 27, 2015

08:00 pm - 01:00 am

Contra Dance

Fayerweather 202 (Beckham Hall)

Monday, March 02, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Olga Sendra Ferrer
The Mobile Margin: (Re)Constructing Barcelona During the Spanish Dictatorship (1939-1975).

This lecture will consider a triple-sided relationship between urban environment, photography, and literature, in order to show how photography and the written text not only reproduce but also reciprocally construct the physicality of the city. Through the urban theories of Henry Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, and Edward Soja, we will develop a new theory, the concept of margin, that breaks with the urban geography of dictatorship-era Barcelona, which was characterized, in broad strokes, by a dual process of interrupted planning and abusive speculation, and created a peripheral city inhabited by the 'other Catalans'? This simplistic center-periphery axis neglects not only the complexity of the margin, but also the heterogeneity of this Barcelona that will establish the foundations of the city into the 21st century. In this presentation, I will show how literature and photography envisions a new urban topography in which they make the margin manifest by questioning and contesting the fixedness of bourgeois Barcelona, while simultaneously seeking their own legitimization as citizens with the right to intervene in the construction and management of this city.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Thursday, March 26, 2015

09:00 am - 10:00 am

Sustainability Advisory Group for Environmental Stewardship (SAGES) March Meeting

Usdan 108 (Taylor Meeting Room)

Monday, March 30, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Professor Stephanie Ponsavady, Wesleyan
Driving Metaphors: The Politics and Poetics of Automobiles in Colonial and Postcolonial France

In a sense, cars and metaphors are all means of transport, instruments used in order to produce a displacement. In France, the rise of the automobile coincided with another movement, the nation's expansion overseas in the late 19th century. How have cars and literature powered France's mobility? From automobile pioneering in Indochina to Roland Barthes's Mythologies, I invite us to take cars and metaphors for a spin in reality. My approach encompasses not only corporeal movement of people and the physical transport of objects but also imaginative travel, the vehicles and metaphors that have enabled and coerced some to live mobile lives and others to remain immobile in France and its colonial empire. By bringing together history and literature, my presentation highlights the relationships between local and global networks of mobility and brings into focus the political projects inherent in the power relations inherited from French colonization and now informing processes of globalization.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Monday, April 06, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Min Kyung Lee, Holy Cross
Blank Spaces and Cartographic Sites

The map is often used as a tool to navigate spaces and to locate oneself in those spaces-imagined or real. These spatial practices rely on an assumption that a map is a representation, and that regardless of its medium, as printed charts on paper or digital projections on a handheld device, it refers to a place. My presentation interrogates the basis of the link often made between spaces and maps, and seeks to dispel the assumption of the map as a mere description. By outlining a history of surveying and mapping Paris, I will discuss the values of reproduction, circulation and mobility that were promulgated through the practices and methods of drawing official urban plans during the 19th century. I will also address the architectural context and consequences of the period's emergent cartographic modalities, as well as provide insight and pose questions about the modalities employed by our contemporary mapping applications.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Friday, April 10, 2015

08:00 pm - 01:00 am

Contra Dance

Fayerweather 202 (Beckham Hall)

Monday, April 13, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Professor Claudia Tatinge Nascimento, Wesleyan

The trouble with "performance" or the contemporary anti-theatrical prejudice

Sitting at pale reproductions of what Realism once was, audiences forget that the theatrical experience once elicited passionate philosophical debates and provoked riots at opening nights. What sets the theatrical endeavor apart is its capacity to move from the stage to the streets, between real and fictional, through material and virtual presences, away from or towards the body. Theater exists with or without text, speaks across gender, race, and class, and has always employed a broad array of performing and visual arts. The anxiety provoked by its shape-shifting properties lies at the core of a longstanding anti-theatrical prejudice. The antipathy that theater meets with today does not do justice to its history. As a result, some of the most innovative contemporary productions are viewed as ?performance? rather than ?theater.? Taking The Seagull?s exposition of a turning-point moment in theater history as a warning tale, this talk explores how today?s anti-theatrical prejudice is blind to many of this art form?s recent accomplishments.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Monday, April 20, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Professor Gayle Salamon, Princeton
The Simple Click of Her Heel on the Ground:
Gendered Phenomenologies of Walking

This lecture is drawn from a book I am completing on about the murder of Larry/Latisha King, a gender-transgressive 15-year-old who was shot and killed in an Oxnard, California junior high school by classmate Brandon McInerney. McInerney was 14 at the time of the killing and was charged as an adult in the subsequent murder trial. In this case, bodily movement marked by the style of queer gender becomes a target of homophobic and transphobic aggression through first being read as constituting an act of aggression. In this book, I am exploring about how phenomenologies of the body might help illuminate what happened when the murder case went to trial. I argue that a phenomenology of walking illustrates how Latisha's gender was read, and use phenomenological description to unpack the performance of gender in the courtroom, exploring how queer gender was mimetically enacted through the bodies of the attorneys during the trial.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Monday, April 27, 2015

06:00 pm - 08:30 pm

Center for Humanities Monday Night Lecture Series

Rosa Ficek, Andrew Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow Wesleyan

Integration, The Pan American Highway, and What Happens Along the Way

From liberal political and economic perspectives, integration refers to the assimilation of marginalized groups into a nation or to the creation of free trade areas and supra-national entities associated with globalization. This talk draws from ethnographic insights from the Pan American Highway-a network of roads that integrates the Americas at national and hemispheric scales- to suggest an alternative way of understanding integration. It traces mobility practices along an unfinished section of the highway in eastern Panama to show that, rather than an expansionist project that assimilates parts into a larger whole, integration is a project fraught with heterogeneous actors and designs that come together as the highway creates connections across difference. These heterogeneities?linked to the highway's project of Western modernity, but not necessarily modern in the same way, or even modern at all-interrupt, undermine, and work alongside state and imperial projects of expansion, transforming the highway itself.

Usdan 300 (Daniel Family Commons & Lounge)

Thursday, April 30, 2015

09:00 am - 10:00 am

Sustainability Advisory Group for Environmental Stewardship (SAGES) April Meeting

Usdan 108 (Taylor Meeting Room)

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

08:00 pm - 01:00 am

Contra Dance

Fayerweather 202 (Beckham Hall)