Languages Available via Alternative Modes of Learning

Many Wesleyan students study or intern abroad in countries whose languages are not regularly taught at Wesleyan. Those students are strongly urged to petition to receive partial-credit for instruction in the relevant language, both prior to and following their experience abroad, through one of the following modalities. 

SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE PROGRAM (SILP)

Students enrolled in the Self-Instructional Language Program (SILP) learn a language working independently, in collaboration with a native speaker and using texts and resources available in the FCGS. The syllabus and course materials will be developed in consultation with the FCGS staff. 

For more information, make an appointment with Emmanuel Paris-Bouvret, Director of Language Resources and Technology (eparis@wesleyan.edu).

MANGO LANGUAGES 

Mango Languages affords the entire Wesleyan community – students, faculty, staff, and alumni—the opportunity to be introduced to the over 70 world languages offered through this online resource. Anyone can create an account and begin to learn a language at any time for FREE! Current students can also use Mango to earn 1/4 credit. See below for details of both options.

  • Mango Language for Non-Credit

    To try out Mango and start learning, click the appropriate link:

        

  • Mango Language for a ΒΌ Credit
    Students can take a Mango Language course during the fall, winter, spring, and summer terms with no extra tuition cost.

    Students looking to receive quarter-credit through Mango Languages must meet these two criteria:
    • The language has to be a Less Commonly Taught Language that is not available on campus. Specifically, you cannot take a Mango course in any of these 16 languages: Arabic, ASL, Chinese, French, German, Ancient Greek, Hebrew, Hindi-Urdu, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Swahili.

    • The purpose of learning the language is for studying abroad, applying to a fellowship or internship, relearning a heritage language, and/or for professional development in a career field.

     

    STEP 1: SCHEDULE TIME TO MEET WITH DIRECTOR OF LANGUAGE RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY
    You will need to meet with an Emmanuel Paris-Bouvret (eparis@wesleyan.edu) to see if Mango Languages is a good fit for your language studies. At this meeting, you will be guided on how to the Mango program works and the steps you will need to take in order to receive credit. Understand that this is a self-instructed online language program and you are responsible to complete coursework independently. You will not meet as a class. This is a pass/fail course. 

    STEP 2: FILL OUT “ADD/DROP” FORM
    You will need three signatures: Faculty Advisor, Class Dean, and Course Instructor. Once all three signatures are completed, submit this form to the Registrar’s Office at North College. A new course will be created for you. Moodle course may be created for you. 

    STEP 3: CREATE A LOG-IN ON MANGO LANGUAGES
    The first time you log-in you will have to create a profile. You will then be able to later login from any computer or using the Mango App. Please use your @wesleyan.edu email address.

    STEP 4: NAVIGATING THE MANGO HOMEPAGE
    The homepage shows your activities on Mango Languages such as how many learning hours you have accumulated, how many language courses you have taken, and how many lessons you’ve completed.

    STEP 5: CHOOSE YOUR LANGUAGE(S)
    Mango Languages allow you to develop listening/speaking proficiency through dialogues and theme-based units (i.e. people, family, travel, activities, places). The navigation bar in on the upper left-hand side. 

    STEP 6: COMPLETE MOODLE ASSIGNMENTS
    You will be automatically enrolled in a Mango course which will include 5 assignments, one of them being a final reflection essay (see example below). Assignments must be completed by the end of the quarter to receive a passing grade.

    Write a 500-1000-word reflective essay on how learning the target language has helped you prepared for study abroad and or future plans. Are there similarities and differences between this language and your native language, if so, what and how? How do you hope to use this linguistic knowledge in the future?