Fall 2019 Compass Workshops

The Compass Workshop series (formerly known as Academic Technology Roundtable) is the result of a collaboration between the CPI, ITS, and Library Services. The goal of these workshops is to bring faculty and staff together to learn about and discuss the kinds of innovative pedagogies and technological methods their colleagues at Wesleyan are using. Lunch will be served!

September 24, 2019
12:00-1:00 PM
Boger 114

When Research and Teaching Can be Friends: Developing a Humanities Lab at Wesleyan

The collaborative cross-and-inter-campus venture of the Traveler’s Lab (co-led by myself, Gary Shaw (HIST), and Adam Franklin-Lyons (of Marlboro College)) has been working to bring together professors and students from History, COL, QAC, Classics, EES, Math, Compsci, PSYCH, and more to do real live research together.

By framing our research questions as inter-disciplinary inquiries, and by drawing on the massive umbrella of practices that fall under “digital scholarship,” we have made significant headway in working out how to infect students with the energy we all bring to our scholarship, and to even take significant new steps in that work over the course of the teaching semester. It might be a miracle, or it might be a replicable experiment. Come and make up your own mind, hear about what we’ve been doing, and help us brainstorm about how to do it better.

Guest Speaker:  Jesse Torgerson, Assistant Professor of Letters; History; Medieval Studies

October 31, 2019
12:00-1:00 PM
Boger 115

Digital Intro: Project-based learning connecting introductory course content with state-of-the-art digital skills

Project-based learning is an instructional approach based on authentic, real-world activities aimed at engaging student interest and enthusiasm. Designed to answer a question or solve a problem, it allows students to face challenges that lead to answers.

“Digital-Intro” is an initiative aimed at designing digital projects (programming, video editing, data analytics, web development, etc.) for introductory courses. Traditionally taught topics provide the basis for inquiry and design opportunities to engage with new digital skills. We will talk about work in this area with the goal of engaging those interested in designing new digital projects for their courses.

Guest Speaker: Lisa Dierker, Professor of Psychology

November 21, 2019
12:00-1:00 PM
ALLB 311

Argumentation, Debate, and Role-Playing: Cultivating Oral Expression in Safe Spaces

Guest Speaker: Sarah Ryan, Associate Professor of the Practice in Oral Communication

 

Spring 2019 Compass Workshops

April 17, 2019
12:15-1:15 pm
Boger 115

SensusAccess & Digital Devices: The What, Why, and How

SensusAccess is an online tool, used with a Wesleyan email address, which converts digital files into accessible formats, such as searchable PDFs, eBooks, or audio files for reading/listening to with a digital device. The majority of computers, tablets, and phones read text aloud, type what is dictated, and permit taking notes on digital material. We will review the technologies available at our fingertips which can increase access to courses through UDL components, as well as increase our own personal efficiency through digital access.

It is encouraged to bring a phone, iPad/tablet, and/or laptop to “play along”!

Presenter:  Crystal Rose Hill, Accessibility Specialist


Past Workshops:


February 14, 2019
12:00-1:00 pm
ALLB 311

Synthesizing Image and Text in the Classroom: A Case Study from the Life of the Buddha

The challenges of studying visual art, literature, and their institutional contexts in a synthetic fashion are acute throughout the humanities today. This workshop will present some digital approaches to integrating image and text for the classroom using the Mirador and StoryMap platforms. Examples will draw on the Life of the Buddha project.

Presenter: Andrew Quintman, Associate Professor, Religion and East Asian Studies

February 25, 2019
12:15-1:15 pm                  CANCELLED
ALLB 311

Collaborative and Active Reading through Digital Annotation

To become a more active reader (we are taught), we must think of ourselves as in dialogue with the text we are reading and scribble notes in the margin. Increasingly, however, students rely on digital editions that necessarily change the way they interact with the text. Digital annotation preserves the ancient practice of annotation, while creating new opportunities for interaction and collaboration. In this Compass, we will discuss the opportunities digital annotation tools, specifically hypothesis.is, create for new forms of student engagement, allowing them to share ideas, interpretations, references, or media that significantly change the way students acquire and produce knowledge.

Presenter: Rachel Schnepper, Director of Academic Technology, ITS

February 27, 2019
12:15-1:15 pm
USDAN 108

Anxiety to Creativity: Utilizing Uncertainty in the Classroom, Part 1

The student experience of uncertainty often contains significant anxiety about the future. However, uncertainty is also something that can be harnessed to enhance creative and complex thinking. This workshop explores ways in which uncertainty can be utilized in the classroom to encourage exploration and adaptability, and lessen anxiety and fear of failure.

Part 1 will include a presentation and discussion.

Presenter: Tess Bird, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for Writing in the Social Sciences

March 6, 2019
12:15-1:15 pm
Woodhead Lounge

Anxiety to Creativity: Utilizing Uncertainty in the Classroom, Part 2

The student experience of uncertainty often contains significant anxiety about the future. However, uncertainty is also something that can be harnessed to enhance creative and complex thinking. This workshop explores ways in which uncertainty can be utilized in the classroom to encourage exploration and adaptability, and lessen anxiety and fear of failure.

Part 2 will include an activity and more in-depth discussion about teaching methods.

Presenter: Tess Bird, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for Writing in the Social Sciences

April 3, 2019
12:15-1:15 pm
USDAN 108

The Liberal Arts, OER, and You!  Engaging with open educational resources at Wesleyan

Did you know that over the past thirty years the average cost of college textbooks has risen more than 800%? Or that more than 60% of students will skip purchasing a textbook at some point due to how expensive they are?  Wesleyan’s students are not immune from the impact of rising textbook costs!  

Open Educational Resources (OER) can help!  These openly licensed textbooks, documents, and media are typically low- or even no-cost, but just as academically rigorous as traditional textbooks.  During this Compass event, a panel of faculty and students will introduce OER and its advantages, share reasons for using these resources, and discuss how these materials have been integrated into their courses.  

Join us for a timely discussion about these alternative teaching resources that are gaining support among institutions of higher education.   

Speakers include:  Demetrius Colvin (Student Resource Center),  Brian Stewart (Physics), and Wesleyan Student Association representatives Rosanne Ng and Ariel Deutsch.