Campus Updates and News

Last updated Thursday, April 2, 2020 at 9:30 a.m.

Wesleyan University is actively monitoring the global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and its potential impacts on our campus community. Our top priority continues to be the health and safety of our Wesleyan students, staff, and faculty. While the University remains operational, it has moved to a distance learning model through the end of the spring semester. Wesleyan is committed to completing all courses this semester, and to carrying out our mission of liberal education under these difficult conditions.

Please note that Wesleyan has canceled all on-campus events, including conferences, athletics, and performing arts, until further notice. The campus is closed to visitors for the remainder of the semester. In addition, all University-sponsored, connected, or funded domestic and international travel for students, faculty, and staff is prohibited, and the University strongly discourages all personal travel except for the purposes of students returning home.

Please view the video below, released on March 11, 2020, to hear from President Michael S. Roth ’78 about the decision to move classes online.


 

Related News from Wesleyan

Dancey on the Government’s Response to the Coronavirus Crisis

Dancey on the Government’s Response to the Coronavirus Crisis

Associate Professor of Government Logan Dancey’s research and teaching interests include the United States Congress, campaigns and elections, and public opinion. We spoke to him about the government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. As a scholar of legislative decision-making, can you describe how the workings of the United States Congress look different during a time…
Aalgaard: COVID-Related Incidents Part of a Long “Historical Arc of Anti-Asian Racism”

Aalgaard: COVID-Related Incidents Part of a Long “Historical Arc of Anti-Asian Racism”

Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies Scott Aalgaard studies modern and contemporary Japan, including the experiences of Japanese-Americans during World War II, when approximately 120,000 people of Japanese descent were forced into internment camps. We spoke to him about the echoes of that history in the surge in racist incidents against Asian-Americans since the start…
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External Resources

This webpage catalogs important information for our University community, but is not intended to serve as a single reference about the rapidly evolving situation. Other official sources include: