WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY PRESENTS THE ANNUAL MEIGS DISTINGUISHED LECTURE IN U.S. HISTORY

  • “Populism” and Bigotry: Lessons from the 1920s Ku Klux Klan (Fall 2018)

    Linda Gordon, Professor of History and a University Professor of the Humanities at New York University.

    Read More

    Gordon’s early scholarship focused on the historical roots of social policies, especially as they concern gender and family issues. In her later work, she has explored other ways of presenting history to a broad audience, publishing the microhistory, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction (Harvard, 1999) and the biography, Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits (W.W. Norton, 2009), both of which won the Bancroft Prize. Her Meigs Distinguished Lecture will be drawn from her recent book on the Ku Klux Klan.

    Tuesday, October 16, 2018
    4:30 p.m.
    Allbritton 311

    Sponsored by the History Department

  • The Franklin Stove: Heat and Life in the Little Ice Age (Fall 2017)

    Joyce E. Chaplin, (PhD and MA Johns Hopkins, BA Northwestern) is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History at Harvard.

    Read More

    A lecture focusing on climate change, resilience, and adaptation in early America, taking Franklin’s stove and his works on climate and heat as central examples. Professor Chaplin is most interested in topics where humans and nature meet, including subjects in early American history, intellectual history, the history of science, and environmental history. An award-winning author, her major works include An Anxious Pursuit: Agricultural Innovation and Modernity in the Lower South, 1730–1815 (1993), Subject Matter: Technology, the Body, and Science on the Anglo-American Frontier, 1500–1676 (2001), The First Scientific American: Benjamin Franklin and the Pursuit of Genius (2006), and Round about the Earth:  Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit (2012). She is also the editor of Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography: A Norton Critical Edition (2012). Her reviews and essays have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the London Review of Books, and the Wall Street Journal. Professor Chaplin’s most recent book, co-authored with Alison Bashford, is The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus (2016).

    Sponsored by the History Department