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Major Requirements

African American Studies

The African American studies major consists of eleven semester courses. At least seven of these courses must be cross-listed with African American studies: the three required core courses, the required junior colloquium, and the three elective courses. All courses must be letter-graded and must be completed at Wesleyan. One research tutorial can be counted toward the eleven required courses, as can two courses taken away from Wesleyan and used to fulfill the student’s chosen area of concentration. The major program must include the following:

Required core courses (3 courses). Students are required to take and successfully complete all three of the core courses. Students may not substitute or transfer any other course to meet these requirements.

AFAM202 Introduction to African American Literature 1
AFAM203 African American History, 1444-1877 1
AFAM204 Introduction to Modern African American History 1

Junior colloquium (AFAM301). This course is required of all majors and should be taken in the first semester of the junior year.

Elective courses in African American studies (3 courses). Majors must complete one elective course in each of the following three areas:

  • Literature and literary theory
  • Social and behavioral sciences (any AFAM SBS course except history)
  • The arts (art, art history, dance, film, creative writing, music, theater)

The three elective courses must be 200-level or higher. These courses should be cross-listed with African American studies, although in special circumstances students can petition to use a course that is not formally cross-listed with AFAM as one of their electives.

Field of concentration (4 courses). Each major must take four courses that represent an area of concentration. Concentrations may be conceived either disciplinarily (with the four courses coming from a single department) or thematically (with courses selected from different disciplines but designed around a specific topic). Concentration courses do not necessarily have to be cross-listed with AFAM. One 100-level course can count in the concentration. None of the four courses taken in the field of concentration can count toward the AFAM core courses or the AFAM elective courses. We strongly recommend that students design their concentrations in consultation with their major advisor.

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American Studies

Majors in American studies must take 11 courses (12 for honor candidates). The department recommends that first-year students and sophomores considering the major enroll in a survey course. These courses offer an introduction and overview of important issues and questions in American studies and provide a solid foundation for advanced work in the major.

Junior core courses constitute the foundational base for the major

 AMST200 and one junior colloquium are required of every major. The colonialism course situates American studies in a hemispheric frame of reference and introduces a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to an intercultural analysis of the Americas. Junior colloquia explore in-depth a range of theoretical perspectives utilized in American studies, consider the history and changing shape of the multifaceted American studies enterprise, and engage students in research and analysis. Students may take more than one junior colloquium and count the second one as an elective.

Concentration and Electives

In addition to junior core courses and the senior requirement, the major includes seven upper-level electives that focus on the cultures of the Americas. The heart of each major’s course of study consists of a cluster of four courses among those electives that forms an area of concentration (these should be numbered AMST201 and above).

A concentration within American studies is an intellectually coherent plan of study (developed in consultation with an advisor) that explores in detail a specific aspect of the culture(s) and society of the United States. It may be built around a discipline (including history, literary criticism, government, or sociology), a field (such as cultural studies, ethnic studies, or queer studies), or a “problematic” (such as ecology and culture or politics and culture). As models and inspiration for prospective concentrators, we have developed descriptions of seven standing concentrations—queer studies, race and ethnicity, cultural studies, material culture, visual culture, historical studies, and literary studies—that we encourage majors to select or adapt. Majors may also devise their own concentrations. Among the latter in recent years have been concentrations in urban studies, disability studies, media studies, social justice, education, and environmental studies. In addition, to ensure chronological breadth, majors must include in their major at least one course that has a majority focuses on American culture(s) in the period before 1900.

Hemispheric Americas and transnational American Studies

Students are also asked to consolidate a hemispheric/transnational American studies focus by taking two courses that build on the comparative foundation supplied in AMST200. Hemispheric Americas and transnational American studies courses are identified on the AMST website (under “for majors”). Courses used to meet this requirement may also, as appropriate, be counted toward concentration, elective, or senior seminar requirements. A senior essay or thesis that utilizes a hemispheric or transnational American studies approach may count toward this requirement.

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Anthropology

In addition to ANTH101, majors are required to earn a minimum of nine anthropology credits, eight of which must be numbered 201 or higher. These must include:

  • two core courses in anthropological theory, ANTH295 and ANTH296 , offered in fall and spring, respectively. As the precise topics of these courses will sometimes vary in consecutive years, it may be possible to repeat one or the other for credit and to fulfill the requirement, as long as the topics are different.
  • our required course in anthropological methods, ANTH208 . We recommend that students take ANTH208 in their sophomore or junior year.
  • an individually designed area of concentration consisting of four elective courses (see below).
  • capstone experience, which may consist of a thesis, essay, or a senior seminar paper (see Honors/Capstone tab).

Students should work out their plans to fulfill the major requirements with their advisor by keeping their Major Certification Form up to date.

Concentrations. Concentrations are flexible specializations that reflect your particular specialization within anthropology. Working with your major advisor, you decide on a coherent set of four courses as your concentration. We encourage you to include one course from outside anthropology. There are three standing concentrations: 

You can also design your own concentration in consultation with your major advisor. Full descriptions of our concentrations are here.


For the Class of 2018, the areas of concentration include the list below. They may opt to continue following these options or consider the concentrations listed above.

  • Social and Cultural Theory
  • Crafting Ethnography
  • Producing and Consuming Culture
  • Colonial and Postcolonial Worlds
  • Capitalist Modernities: Past and Present
  • Social and Political Geographies
  • Material Culture and Temporal Processes
  • Axes of Difference
  • Embodiment and Biopolitics
  • Performance, Representation, Identity

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Archaeology

A major in archaeology consists of at least nine different courses numbered 200 and above:

  • One Gateway course—see list above
  • One Thinking Through Archaeology course—see list above
  • One course in each of the four areas—see lists below
    • Anthropology
    • Art history
    • Classical civilization
    • Methods and theory
  • Two electives in archaeology or related disciplines
  • Senior essay/thesis tutorial (1 or 2 credits)
  • Recommended fieldwork

Anthropology

ARCP202 Paleoanthropology: The Study of Human Evolution 1
ARCP250 Foragers to Farmers: Hunting and Gathering and the Development of Agriculture 1
ARCP268 North America Before Columbus 1

Art History

ARCP215 The Art and Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, 400-1100 1
ARCP292 Archaeology of Food, Trade, and Power in South India 1
ARCP380 Relic and Image: The Archaeology and Social History of Indian Buddhism 1

Classical Studies

ARCP201 Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age Mediterranean 1
ARCP214 Survey of Greek Archaeology 1
ARCP223 Survey of Roman Archaeology and Art 1
ARCP234 Art and Society in Ancient Pompeii 1
ARCP244 Pyramids and Funeral Pyres: Death and the Afterlife in Greece and Egypt 1
ARCP253 Ancient Rome: From Hut Village to Imperial Capital 1
ARCP328 Roman Urban Life 1

Methods and Theory

ARCP314 How to Think Like an Archaeologist 1
ARCP372 Archaeology of Death 1
ARCP383 Grounding the Past: Monument, Site, and Memory 1

Fieldwork

Archaeological fieldwork, typically carried out over the summer, is an excellent way to acquire hands-on experience and training in archaeological methods and excavation techniques. It also allows students to explore the history and material culture of a region in greater depth and, in some cases, even to conduct research on primary materials from a site that can then serve as the basis for a senior thesis or capstone project.

Fieldwork opportunities are offered both by our Wesleyan faculty as well as through a number of programs worldwide. For more information and a list of archaeological field programs, visit wesleyan.edu/archprog/fieldwork/. Excavation experience is strongly encouraged, and completion of an approved archaeological field school program may be substituted for the methods and theory requirement.

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Art History

To complete the major in art history, you must:

  • Take one introductory course (numbered 100–199) and nine courses numbered 200 or above. The nine upper-level courses must include at least two seminars (numbered 300–399). (N.B. Tutorials for honors essays and thesesARHA403 ARHA404, ARHA409, and ARHA410do not count toward the nine required courses.)
  • Satisfy the requirements for your area of concentration. The art history major offers two distinct areas of concentration:
    • Concentration in the history of European, American, or African art. For this concentration, the nine upper-level courses must include at least one course in each of the four historical periods—classical, medieval, Renaissance/Baroque, and modern—and at least one course in the areas of either African or Asian art.
    • Concentration in the history of Asian art. For this concentration, the nine upper-level courses must include five Asian art history courses—one of which must be a seminar—and at least one course in the European, American, or African traditions.

Additional recommendations. All art history majors are strongly urged to take at least one course in archaeology as part of the major. Students who concentrate in the history of Asian art are strongly urged to take at least one course outside the department dealing with the history or culture of premodern Asia.

For planning an art history major, please consult the Course Projections and Planning Worksheet for New Majors under Course Planning Documents on the Art and Art History Department website.

One or two of the required nine upper-level courses may be relevant courses taught at Wesleyan outside the art history program in such departments as History, Religion, Classics, or Anthropology. These courses must be preapproved by your major advisor.

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Art Studio

Students majoring in art studio must satisfactorily complete 11 courses in the department:

  • ARST131
  • At least eight courses numbered 200 or higher:
    • four art studio courses—at least one of which must be in either of the three-dimensional areas of sculpture or architecture
    • four art history courses
      • one Classical through Renaissance
      • one post-Renaissance (ARHA110 preferred) 
      • one non-Western
      • one additional course from the offerings
  • two semesters of senior thesis1
1

In the rare case a student finishes all of his/her graduation requirements in January of the senior year, he/she may complete the major with only one semester of thesis tutorial, still exhibiting in the Spring.

That breaks down to five art studio courses, four art history courses, and two semesters of thesis. Further course study in art studio and art history is recommended. On occasion, 100-level art history courses may be substituted for the requirement of 200-level courses. Majors are required to fulfill their general education as described by the University guidelines, since all are required to complete a senior thesis for honors. Teaching apprentice tutorials in the department will not be counted toward the major.

In the final year of study, each student will develop a focused body of work and mount a solo exhibition. That exhibition is the culmination of a two-semester thesis tutorial and is developed in close critical dialogue with a faculty advisor. The exhibition is critiqued by the faculty advisor and a second critic and must be passed by a vote of the faculty of the art studio program. The senior thesis exhibition provides a rare opportunity for the student to engage in a rigorous, self-directed, creative investigation and in a public dialogue about his/her work.

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Astronomy

The astronomy major is constructed to accommodate both students who are preparing for graduate school and those who are not. The basic requirement for the major is successful completion of the following courses: PHYS113, PHYS116, PHYS213, PHYS214, and PHYS215; MATH121, MATH122, and MATH221; and ASTR155, ASTR211, as well as four upper-level astronomy courses. The required upper-level courses are taken one each semester in the junior and senior years. Depending on the year, the courses will be the following: ASTR221, ASTR222, ASTR224, ASTR231, ASTR232, and ASTR240. PHYS324 and MATH222 are strongly recommended but are not required. Additional upper-level physics courses are also recommended but are not required. Ability to program a computer in at least one of the widely used languages in the sciences, such as C, Fortran, or IDL, is also highly recommended. This does not necessarily mean that students should take a computer science course. Potential majors with graduate school aspirations should complete or place out of the basic physics and mathematics courses listed above, preferably by the end of their sophomore year, and should also take ASTR155 and ASTR211 during their first two years.

Since physics GRE scores are an important admission criterion at most astronomy graduate schools, those planning to go on for a PhD are advised to double major in physics. This can be accomplished by taking several of the following additional courses, normally in the junior and senior years: PHYS324, PHYS313, PHYS315, and PHYS316. Check the published requirements for the physics major for more details and speak to your advisor.

Additional mathematics courses, such as MATH229, may also be chosen.

Click here for more detailed information about the astronomy major, including a sample eight-semester course plan.

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Biology

The biology majors program of study consists of the following.

  • The two introductory courses, BIOL181-BIOL182, with their labs, BIOL191-BIOL192.
  • At least six elective biology courses at the 200 and 300 levels, including one mid-level cell/molecular course (either MB&B208, BIOL210, BIOL212, or BIOL218) and one mid-level organismic/population course (either NS&B213/BIOL213, BIOL214BIOL215, or BIOL216).
    • Note: No more than three of these mid-level courses (listed above) may be counted towards the six advanced elective requirement.
  • Two semesters of general chemistry (CHEM141-CHEM142 or CHEM143-CHEM144)
  • Any three additional semesters of related courses from at least two different departments: physics (PHYS111PHYS112,  PHYS113, or PHYS116), organic chemistry (CHEM251 or CHEM252), mathematics (MATH117 or higher), statistics (MATH132BIOL320/BIOL520, or QAC201), computer science (COMP112, COMP211, or higher) or earth and environmental sciences (E&ES280).

    • Note: A strong chemistry background is especially recommended for students planning to enter graduate or medical school. Most medical and other health-related graduate schools require two years of college-level chemistry, including laboratory components, as well as a course in biochemistry.

Electives may be chosen from among the following courses at the 200, 300, or 500 levels. See WesMaps for current course offerings. The courses are grouped thematically for your convenience only.

Cell and Development Biology

BIOL212 Principles and Mechanisms of Cell Biology 1
BIOL218 Developmental Biology 1
MB&B/BIOL232 Immunology 1
MB&B/BIOL237 Signal Transduction 1
BIOL245 Cellular Neurophysiology 1
BIOL325 Stem Cells: Basic Biology to Clinical Application                                                                        1
BIOL334 Shaping the Organism 1
BIOL340/540 Issues in Development and Evolution 1
BIOL343/543 Muscle and Nerve Development 1
BIOL/NS&B345 Developmental Neurobiology 1

Evolution, Ecology, and Conservation Biology

BIOL214 Evolution 1
BIOL215 Evolution in Human-Altered Environments 1
BIOL216 Ecology 1
BIOL220 Conservation Biology 1
BIOL235 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 1.25
BIOL254 Comparative Animal Behavior 1
BIOL290 Plant Form and Diversity 1
BIOL310 Genomics Analysis 1
BIOL316/516 Plant-Animal Interactions 1
BIOL318/518 Nature and Nurture: The Interplay of Genes and Environment                                                   1
BIOL327/527 Evolutionary and Ecological Bioinformatics 1
BIOL340/540 Issues in Development and Evolution 1
BIOL346 The Forest Ecosystem 1

Genetics, Genomics, and Bioinformatics

MB&B208 Molecular Biology 1
BIOL210 Genomics: Modern Genetics, Bioinformatics, and the Human Genome Project 1
BIOL/MB&B265/COMP113/CIS265 Bioinformatics Programming 1
BIOL327/527 Evolutionary and Ecological Bioinformatics 1
MB&B/BIOL231 Microbiology 1
BIOL310 Genomics Analysis 1
BIOL327/527 Evolutionary and Ecological Bioinformatics 1
MB&B333/533 Gene Regulation 1
MB&B394 Advanced Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Genetics 1
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
MB&B306 Epigenetics 1

Physiology, Neurobiology, and Behavior

NS&B/BIOL213 Behavioral Neurobiology 1
BIOL/NS&B224 Hormones, Brain, and Behavior 1
BIOL235 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 1.25
BIOL/NS&B239 Functional Anatomy of the Human Brain 1
NS&B/BIOL243 Neurohistology 1
BIOL/NS&B245 Cellular Neurophysiology 1
BIOL/NS&B247 Laboratory in Neurophysiology 1
BIOL/NS&B249 Neuroethology 1
BIOL/NS&B250 Laboratory in Cellular and Behavioral Neurobiology                                                               1
BIOL/NS&B252 Cell Biology of the Neuron 1
NS&B/BIOL254 Comparative Animal Behavior 1
BIOL290 Plant Form and Diversity 1
BIOL/NS&B299 Waves, Brains, and Music 1
NS&B/BIOL328 Chemical Senses 1
BIOL/NS&B345 Developmental Neurobiology 1
BIOL/NS&B351 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 1
NS&B/BIOL353 Neurobiology of Neurological Disorders 1
NS&B/BIOL360 Neuroplasticity: How Experience Changes The Brain 1

Fulfilling the biology major

Cross-listed courses that are included on the list above are automatically credited to the biology major. At least two elective courses (200-level and above) that are counted toward the biology major must be used to fulfill only the biology major and cannot be simultaneously used to fulfill another major.

Depending on the student’s specific program, and with prior permission of the chair, up to two biology courses from outside the department may be counted toward the major. Two Wesleyan courses that fall into this category are ANTH202 and ANTH349.

Additional courses that may be credited to the major: BIOL320, E&ES234, MB&B228 and MB&B383, and ECON300. MB&B228 may be counted as long as neither MB&B208 nor MB&B383 is counted toward the major.

Biology majors are allowed to apply at most one elective course taken credit/unsatisfactory toward fulfilling the major requirements; however, this is discouraged because good performance in major courses is an important aspect of a student’s transcript.

Courses in the BIOL 400 series (such as research tutorials) contribute toward graduation but do not count toward the major.

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Chemistry

To major in chemistry, a student should complete a year of Introductory Chemistry (CHEM141/CHEM142 or, preferably, CHEM143/CHEM144, and the associated lab CHEM152), unless the student has been given Advanced Placement credit. In addition, a year of organic chemistry (CHEM251/CHEM252), the concurrent laboratories (CHEM257/CHEM258), and a year of physical chemistry (CHEM337/CHEM338) are required. One year of advanced laboratory is required (CHEM375/CHEM376). Chemistry majors are also required to register for and attend two semesters of CHEM521/CHEM522. The major is completed by electing a total of at least three credits from 300-level courses (other than CHEM337/CHEM338). All courses other than seminars that are required for the chemistry major must be taken under a letter-grading mode (A–F). One of the three 300-level electives may be replaced by two semesters of research (CHEM409/CHEM410 or CHEM423/CHEM424). Seminars or journal clubs cannot be counted as electives. All chemistry majors are strongly encouraged to do research with a faculty member, both during the academic year and over at least one summer. Financial support for summer research is generally available.

One year of calculus (MATH117/MATH118, MATH119/MATH120, or MATH121/MATH122–preferably the latter–or an Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5) and one year of physics (PHYS111/PHYS112PHYS113/PHYS116, or an Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5) are also required for the major. Students who do not study inorganic chemistry in CHEM144, either through exemption or because they have satisfied the introductory chemistry requirement with CHEM141/CHEM142, must select CHEM361 as one of their 300-level electives.

Before or during the second semester of the sophomore year, a student interested in majoring in chemistry should consult with the chair of the Chemistry Department or the departmental advisors for specific areas of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical) concerning a suitable program of study. If the student does opt for the chemistry major, these people may also assist in the choice of a major advisor for the student. Students who intend to be multiple majors are strongly advised to consult with their chemistry advisors at the beginning of their junior year to plan their chemistry program.

A chemistry major planning graduate work in chemistry usually takes at least one additional 300-level chemistry course (excluding CHEM337/CHEM338) and two semesters of undergraduate research, CHEM409/CHEM410 or CHEM423/CHEM424. When feasible, an intensive continuation of research during at least one summer is encouraged. The preparation of a senior thesis based on this research (CHEM409/CHEM410 or CHEM423/CHEM424) provides extremely valuable experience and is strongly recommended.

Graduate courses may be elected with permission. A chemistry major planning to attend medical school, teach in a secondary school, or do graduate work in such fields as biochemistry, geochemistry, environmental science, or chemical physics may request permission from the departmental curriculum committee to replace one of the elective credits in the concentration program with an appropriate course offered by another science or mathematics department. A similar substitution may be requested when appropriate as part of an interdepartmental major. Independent research is encouraged. A solid mathematical background is important to those students who plan to do graduate work in chemistry. Such students should also try to take PHYS113 and PHYS116 prior to their junior year. MATH221 and MATH222 are recommended to those whose interests lie in physical chemistry.

Biological chemistry track

The Chemistry Department recognizes that a number of students each year are interested in a major program containing both a strong biology or biochemistry component and somewhat less emphasis on chemistry than the standard chemistry major. In response to this interest, the Chemistry Department now offers a biological chemistry track. This track would, for example, be an excellent preparation for medical school or graduate school in biochemistry. (Students interested in chemistry as a profession are advised to take the standard chemistry major track, which provides a better preparation for graduate school in chemistry.)

To begin a major in the biological chemistry track, a student should complete a year of Introductory Chemistry (CHEM141/CHEM142 or, preferably, CHEM143/CHEM144, and the associated laboratory, CHEM152), unless the student has been given Advanced Placement credit. In addition, one year of organic chemistry (CHEM251/CHEM252), the concurrent laboratories (CHEM257/CHEM258), and a semester of biology (BIOL181/MB&B181) are required. One year of advanced laboratory (CHEM375/CHEM376) and two semesters of CHEM521/CHEM522 are also required. MB&B395/CHEM395 may be substituted for one semester of CHEM375/CHEM376 by petition. Also required are CHEM383 and CHEM381. The two-semester physical chemistry sequence, CHEM337/CHEM338, can be substituted for CHEM381 with the second semester of this sequence then counting as one of the three electives. Students who have been exempted from CHEM144 must take CHEM361 to gain familiarity with inorganic chemistry.

The three electives normally required for chemistry majors should be taken from the following:

CHEM309 Molecular and Cellular Biophysics 1
CHEM/MB&B321 Biomedicinal Chemistry 1
CHEM/MB&B325 Introduction to Biomolecular Structure 1
CHEM385 Advanced Biochemistry: Enzyme Kinetics 0.5
CHEM/MB&B386 Biological Thermodynamics 1
CHEM387 Enzyme Mechanisms 0.5
CHEM390/MB&B340 Practical Methods in Biochemistry 1
MB&B208 Molecular Biology (or any other chemistry courses, 300-level or higher) 1

One upper-level MB&B course can be used as an elective upon prior approval by the faculty advisor. (Note, however, that only one MB&B course, including MB&B208, not cross-listed with chemistry, may count as an elective toward the major.) Also required is MATH117/MATH119 or MATH121, preferably the latter, or Advanced Placement calculus with an AP score of 4 or 5; MATH118 / MATH120 or MATH122 and a year of physics are recommended. One of the electives may be replaced by two semesters of research (CHEM409/CHEM410 or CHEM423/CHEM424). Other seminars or journal clubs cannot be counted as electives. Participation in the weekly biochemistry evening seminar (CHEM587/CHEM588) and in research, both during the academic year and over at least one summer, are strongly recommended. Students who intend to be multiple majors are strongly advised to consult with their chemistry advisors at the beginning of their junior year to plan their chemistry program.

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Classical Civilization

Requirements for the classical civilization major are a minimum of 10 courses in classical civilization, Greek, and Latin, including at least:

  • Three language courses numbered 102 or higher.
  • One introductory ancient history survey (CCIV231CCIV232). This requirement should be completed by the end of the junior year.
  • One course at any level in material culture.
  • Two classical civilization seminars (CCIV courses numbered 276-399). An advanced Greek or Latin course (numbered above 202) may be substituted for one of the classical civilization seminars.

The first year of Greek or Latin (courses numbered 101 and 102) may not be counted toward the required minimum of 10 courses, but a full year of the student’s second classical language may count as one course toward that minimum.

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Classics

A minimum of 10 courses in Greek, Latin, and classical civilization, including at least:

  • Six courses in Greek or Latin beyond the introductory level (courses numbered 201 or higher).
  • One introductory ancient history survey (CCIV231; CCIV232). This requirement should be completed by the end of the junior year.
  • One classical civilization seminar (CCIV courses numbered 276-399).

The first year of Greek or Latin (courses numbered 101 and 102) may not be counted toward the required minimum of 10 courses, but a full year of the student’s second classical language may count as one course toward that minimum.

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College of East Asian Studies

Majoring in the College of East Asian Studies (CEAS) requires seven courses. These include three core courses plus four in a concentration. Other requirements include language courses, study abroad, and a senior capstone project. Starting with the class of 2020, only courses taken for a grade may be counted towards the major.

Core courses. Each CEAS major is expected to take our interdisciplinary Proseminar (CEAS201) in his or her sophomore year, as well as one survey course on traditional Chinese culture or history and one survey course on traditional Japanese history and culture (these can be taken at any time; a similar course on Korea can be substituted for either of these core survey courses). The goal is to ensure that each CEAS major is firmly anchored in the classical texts and key events that shaped the development of East Asian cultures before the 19th century. Details on the courses that count for the core courses are available at wesleyan.edu/ceas/majoring/core.html.

Concentrations. Each CEAS major must choose one of the six concentrations listed below. Our goal is to ensure that each major’s course of study has methodological coherence in a specific area of study. Course offerings for each concentration may vary in some years according to faculty on campus. Details on the courses that count for the concentrations are available at wesleyan.edu/ceas/majoring/concentrations.html.

  • Art history and art
  • History
  • Language, literature, and film
  • Music
  • Philosophy and religion
  • Political economy

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College of Integrative Sciences (Linked Major)

In addition to majoring in one department or program in NSM, students in the CIS take the following courses for a minimum of six and a maximum of nine credits.

Outline of the linked major

  • CIS221/CIS222 (.5 credits/semester). This is a sophomore-level course designed to introduce students to ongoing research projects in the NSM division. All students interested in applying to the college are required to attend the course for at least one semester. The course involves weekly visits from different faculty members and their students from across the division to discuss their research programs. Potential CIS students are encouraged to take the course during their entire sophomore year to get exposure to the variety of research conducted in the NSM division.
  • Two upper-level electives (2 credits). Upper-level courses should provide core-skills from a discipline outside the primary major. Accordingly, these courses are typically hosted by a department other than the student’s foundational major. The course catalog contains a list of courses identified as interdisciplinary and appropriate for the college. Courses not on this list may potentially be used to fulfill elective requirements, based on consultation with the CIS academic advisor. In general, the specific electives used to fulfill this requirement must be determined in consultation with a student’s CIS linked-major advisor.
  • Two semesters of a journal club or seminar (.5–1 credit). The two journal clubs/seminar series must be in different disciplines. CIS221/CIS222 cannot be used to fulfill this requirement.
  • Senior capstone colloquium (.5 credits). Two semesters of the capstone colloquium are required. In this course, senior CIS fellows present their research to their peers/junior CIS fellows.
  • Research (2–4 credits). Research credits normally come by enrolling in Advanced Research Seminar or Senior Thesis Tutorial. Two credits of research is the minimum requirement. Four research credits are achieved by taking research for a full credit each semester in the junior year and the senior year. Students are strongly encouraged to write a thesis based on their research during their senior year. In unusual cases, the two-credit minimum can also be satisfied through (paid) credits for summer research.
  • One summer research experience. All students are required to spend at least one summer performing research, preferably the summer after their sophomore year, immediately following acceptance to the college. Students are supported during the summer by a CIS fellowship (unless doing the research for credit).

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College of Letters

The program consists of five components and leads to eleven course credits:

  • Five colloquia designed to acquaint students with works of predominantly European literature, history, and philosophy in (respectively)
    • The ancient world
    • The Middle Ages and Renaissance
    • The early modern period (16th–18th centuries)
    • The 19th century
    • The 20th–21st century
  • Four electives. The minimum required is one in history, one in philosophy, one in literature/representation, and one in the major’s target foreign language-literature. These specialized seminars allow students to shape their COL major around a particular interest.
  • Study abroad, in the spring semester of the sophomore year (or in certain situations, in the summer following sophomore year), usually in Europe, Israel, or in another country (if approved by the director of the COL) where the major’s selected foreign language is spoken.
  • One comprehensive examination in April/May of the junior year, covering the texts read in the first three colloquia.
  • One senior thesis or essay, whose topic can be chosen from a very wide range of disciplines. This work, along with the specialized seminars, allows COL students to further shape their major along their own interests.

In all these contexts, much emphasis is put on the development of skills in writing, speaking, and analytical argument. Students are encouraged to take intellectual risks, and for this reason letter grades are not given in courses taken for COL major credit; also, COL seminars generally require papers rather than final examinations. Instead of giving grades, tutors write detailed evaluations of their students’ work at the end of each semester, and these are kept on record (and discussed with each student upon request). Our general goal is cultivation of “the educated imagination.”

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College of Social Studies

Sophomore year. There are no letter grades in the sophomore year. At the heart of the program in the sophomore year are the weekly tutorial and tutorial essay that are designed to develop conceptual and analytic skills as well as precision in writing and argument. The academic year is composed of three trimesters of eight weeks each, and each student takes a trimester tutorial in history, government, and economics. Due to their intensive nature, tutorials account for more than half of the student’s academic work during the year. A semester-length colloquium in social theory in the fall and selected courses within and outside the social sciences complete the sophomore program. Comprehensive examinations, administered by external examiners at the end of the sophomore year, produce the only official grade for sophomores.

Junior year. The second semester of the junior year involves a philosophy colloquium on the modes of inquiry in the social sciences and a sequence of two seven-week tutorials building on the sophomore tutorials, each carrying one course credit. Students will also take several of their elective courses in the three CSS disciplines to enhance their research skills and the ability to accomplish major writing projects in the social sciences. Juniors also have the option of studying abroad in their first semester.

Senior year. In addition to a CSS Senior Colloquium in the first semester, the senior year requires completion of a substantial piece of written work. This requirement can be fulfilled by either an honors thesis (two semesters) or a senior essay (one semester). In all cases it is a sustained and serious investigation of an intellectual problem.

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Computer Science

To complete the computer science major, a student must complete the following courses:

Required Courses
COMP211 Computer Science I 1
COMP212 Computer Science II 1
COMP301 Automata Theory and Formal Languages 1
COMP312 Algorithms and Complexity 1
COMP321 Design of Programming Languages 1
COMP331 Computer Structure and Organization (or COMP231 if taken before 2015-2016) 1
MATH228 Discrete Mathematics 1
or MATH261 Abstract Algebra: Groups, Rings, and Fields
MATH221 Vectors and Matrices 1
or MATH223 Linear Algebra
Select two additional electives 2

Notes:

  • Any COMP course at the 300+ level except COMP409-COMP410 can be used as an elective for the major.
  • At most, one individual or group tutorial may be used as an elective unless prior approval is given.
  • Only 1.0-credit courses taken A–F may be used to satisfy major requirements.

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Dance

Coursework for the major includes composition, dance techniques, dance histories, research methods, pedagogy, ethnography, improvisation, anatomy, repertory, and dance and technology.

Required Courses
DANC249
DANC250
Making Dances I: Solo Work
and Dance Composition (Gateway course series for the major; fall semester of sophomore year)
2
DANC371 Choreography Workshop (Taken fall or spring of junior year) 1
DANC105 Dance Production Techniques 0.5
Dance Technique Courses
Select six of the following: 3
Students must achieve Level II in at least 2 traditions and one of those should be modern dance.
Modern Dance I
and Modern Dance II
and Modern Dance III
Ballet I
and Ballet II
West African Dance I
and West African Dance II
and West African Dance III
Bharata Natyam I: Introduction of South Indian Classical Dance
Bharata Natyam II: Embracing the Traditional and the Modern
DANC435
DANC445
Advanced Dance Practice A
and Advanced Dance Practice B
0.75
Methodology Course
Select one of the following (above the 200 level): 1
American Dance History
Perspectives in Dance as Culture: What the Body Knows- Social Change and Revolution
Electives
Select two of the following: 2
Anatomy and Kinesiology
Embodiment and Education: Critical and Liberatory Perspectives
Improvisational Forms
American Dance History
Perspectives in Dance as Culture: What the Body Knows- Social Change and Revolution
Repertory and Performance: Sissy Vop Breakdown
Senior Project or Thesis
Senior project or thesis in dance 1-2
DANC398 Senior Colloquium in Dance Research 0.25
Total Hours 11.5-12.5

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Earth and Environmental Sciences

  • E&ES gateway course (E&ES101, E&ES115, E&ES197, or E&ES199).
  • Earth and environmental scientists need a broad background in the natural sciences. Therefore, E&ES majors are required to take one year (two semesters) of gateway courses from two of the following disciplines for a total of four courses: biology (BIOL181/BIOL182), chemistry (CHEM141/CHEM142 or CHEM143/CHEM144), mathematics (MATH117/MATH118, MATH119/MATH120, or MATH121/MATH122), or physics (PHYS111/PHYS112 or PHYS113/PHYS116). Upper-level courses in these disciplines can be substituted, as can statistics courses for mathematics. Students are urged to complete these introductory courses within their first two years. Students considering professional work in the sciences are encouraged to take gateways in more than two disciplines, including any associated lab courses, as well as upper-level coursework in other natural science and mathematics disciplines.
  • The Sophomore Field Course (E&ES195). This course is typically taken during the spring semester of the sophomore year. 
  • The Senior Seminar (E&ES497). This capstone is typically taken in the senior year.
  • For the Class of 2020 and earlier: Seven upper-level courses, comprised of three "cores" and four "electives." Lab courses associated with the primary courses are required. Up to two upper-level natural science or math courses taken in other departments can count as electives; up to two preapproved courses from study-abroad programs can also count as cores or electives. At least four of the upper-level courses must be Wesleyan E&ES courses. Tutorial and the senior thesis do not count towards the requirement.

The Department of E&ES does not require completion of Wesleyan's General Education Requirements to complete the major. Honors students are required to complete Wesleyan's General Education Requirements through stage II.

Core Courses

E&ES213
E&ES214
Mineralogy
and Laboratory Study of Minerals
1.5
E&ES215
E&ES216
Earth Materials
and Earth Materials Laboratory
1.5
E&ES220
E&ES221
Geomorphology
and Geomorphology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES223
E&ES224
Structural Geology
and Field Geology
1.5
E&ES230
E&ES231
Sedimentology
and Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Techniques
1.5
E&ES234
E&ES235
Geobiology
and Geobiology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES250
E&ES251
Environmental Geochemistry
and Environmental Geochemistry Laboratory
1.5
E&ES260
E&ES261
Oceans and Climate
and Techniques in Ocean and Climate Investigations
1.5
BIOL216 Ecology 1

Elective courses

E&ES244
E&ES245
Soils
and Soils Laboratory
1.5
E&ES246
E&ES247
Hydrology
and Hydrology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES270 Quantitative Methods for the Biological and Environmental Sciences 1
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
E&ES313
E&ES314
Petrogenesis of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
and Laboratory Study of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
1.5
E&ES317
E&ES318
Volcanology
and Volcanology Lab Course
1.5
E&ES321 Planetary Evolution 1
E&ES359 Global Climate Change 1
E&ES361 Living in a Polluted World 1
E&ES368 Isotope Geochemistry 1
E&ES375 Modeling the Earth and Environment 1
E&ES385
E&ES386
Remote Sensing
and Remote-Sensing Laboratory
1.5

Senior Seminar

E&ES497 Senior Seminar 1.5

For the Class of 2021 and later: Seven upper-level courses. Five of these courses must cover the following thematic areas: two from "Earth and Planets" (numbered 201-233 and 301-333), two from "Hydrosphere, Biosphere, and Atmosphere" (numbered 234-266 and 334-366), and one from "Methods" (numbered 267-299 and 367-399). Lab courses associated with the primary courses are required. The remaining two courses may come from any thematic area. Also, the following can be used: Up to two upper-level natural science or math courses taken in other departments, and up to two preapproved courses from study-abroad programs. At least four of the upper-level courses must be Wesleyan E&ES courses. Tutorials and the senior thesis do not count towards the requirement.

The Department of E&ES does not require completion of Wesleyan's General Education Requirements to complete the major. Honors students are required to complete Wesleyan's General Education Requirements through stage II.

Earth and Planet courses

E&ES213
E&ES214
Mineralogy
and Laboratory Study of Minerals
1.5
E&ES215
E&ES216
Earth Materials
and Earth Materials Laboratory
1.5
E&ES220
E&ES221
Geomorphology
and Geomorphology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES223
E&ES224
Structural Geology
and Field Geology
1.5
E&ES230
E&ES231
Sedimentology
and Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Techniques
1.5
E&ES313
E&ES314
Petrogenesis of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
and Laboratory Study of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
1.5
E&ES317
E&ES318
Volcanology
and Volcanology Lab Course
1.5
E&ES319
E&ES320
Meteorites and Cosmochemistry
and Meteorites Laboratory
1.5
E&ES321 Planetary Evolution 1

Hydrosphere, Biosphere, and Atmosphere Courses

E&ES234
E&ES235
Geobiology
and Geobiology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES236 Mass Extinctions in the Oceans: Animal Origins to Anthropocene 1
E&ES238 The Forest Ecosystem 1
E&ES240 Invasive Species: Biology, Policy, and Management 1
E&ES242 Ecological Resilience: The Good, the Bad, and the Mindful 1.25
E&ES244
E&ES245
Soils
and Soils Laboratory
1.5
E&ES246
E&ES247
Hydrology
and Hydrology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES250
E&ES251
Environmental Geochemistry
and Environmental Geochemistry Laboratory
1.5
E&ES260
E&ES261
Oceans and Climate
and Techniques in Ocean and Climate Investigations
1.5
E&ES359 Global Climate Change 1
E&ES361 Living in a Polluted World 1

Method courses

E&ES270 Quantitative Methods for the Biological and Environmental Sciences 1
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
E&ES368 Isotope Geochemistry 1
E&ES375 Modeling the Earth and Environment 1
E&ES380 Advanced GIS and Spatial Analyses 1
E&ES385
E&ES386
Remote Sensing
and Remote-Sensing Laboratory
1.5

Career Options and the E&ES major

Earth and environmental sciences majors go on to pursue a wide range of careers, limited only by their own imaginations. E&ES courses can be selected to help prepare for a student’s long-term interests. The course listings below are not requirements, but suggested guidelines. Students interested in academic or research careers should consider involvement in research or producing a senior thesis.

Geology. These courses can help prepare students for academic careers or jobs in industry or government in natural resource or geohazard management (e.g., USGS, water resources, mining and energy industries).

E&ES101 Dynamic Earth 1
E&ES115 Introduction to Planetary Geology 1
E&ES213
E&ES214
Mineralogy
and Laboratory Study of Minerals
1.5
E&ES220
E&ES221
Geomorphology
and Geomorphology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES223
E&ES224
Structural Geology
and Field Geology
1.5
E&ES230
E&ES231
Sedimentology
and Sedimentology/Stratigraphy Techniques
1.5
E&ES246
E&ES247
Hydrology
and Hydrology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES260
E&ES261
Oceans and Climate
and Techniques in Ocean and Climate Investigations
1.5
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
E&ES313
E&ES314
Petrogenesis of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
and Laboratory Study of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
1.5
E&ES317
E&ES318
Volcanology
and Volcanology Lab Course
1.5
E&ES321 Planetary Evolution 1
E&ES385
E&ES386
Remote Sensing
and Remote-Sensing Laboratory
1.5
E&ES497 Senior Seminar 1.5

Environmental Science/Environmental Chemistry. These courses can help prepare students for jobs in consulting, government, or nonprofit organizations (e.g., EPA, NOAA, USGS, state agencies), or for academic careers in climate science and water resources.

E&ES197 Introduction to Environmental Studies 1
E&ES199 Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability 1
E&ES213
E&ES214
Mineralogy
and Laboratory Study of Minerals
1.5
E&ES220
E&ES221
Geomorphology
and Geomorphology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES223
E&ES224
Structural Geology
and Field Geology
1.5
E&ES234
E&ES235
Geobiology
and Geobiology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES244
E&ES245
Soils
and Soils Laboratory
1.5
E&ES250
E&ES251
Environmental Geochemistry
and Environmental Geochemistry Laboratory
1.5
E&ES260
E&ES261
Oceans and Climate
and Techniques in Ocean and Climate Investigations
1.5
E&ES270 Quantitative Methods for the Biological and Environmental Sciences 1
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
E&ES359 Global Climate Change 1
E&ES368 Isotope Geochemistry 1
E&ES497 Senior Seminar 1.5
BIOL216 Ecology 1

Environmental Science/Ecology. These courses can help prepare students for jobs in government, consulting, and nonprofit organizations (e.g., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, state conservation agencies, Nature Conservancy, National Audubon Society) or academic careers in conservation and natural resource management.

E&ES197 Introduction to Environmental Studies 1
E&ES199 Introduction to Environmental Science and Sustainability 1
E&ES234
E&ES235
Geobiology
and Geobiology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES244
E&ES245
Soils
and Soils Laboratory
1.5
E&ES250
E&ES251
Environmental Geochemistry
and Environmental Geochemistry Laboratory
1.5
E&ES260
E&ES261
Oceans and Climate
and Techniques in Ocean and Climate Investigations
1.5
E&ES270 Quantitative Methods for the Biological and Environmental Sciences 1
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
E&ES359 Global Climate Change 1
E&ES368 Isotope Geochemistry 1
E&ES385
E&ES386
Remote Sensing
and Remote-Sensing Laboratory
1.5
E&ES497 Senior Seminar 1.5

Planetary Geology. These courses can help prepare students for jobs in government and industry (e.g., NASA, remote sensing, and GIS contractors) or for academic careers in space science and remote sensing.

E&ES101 Dynamic Earth 1
E&ES115 Introduction to Planetary Geology 1
E&ES213
E&ES214
Mineralogy
and Laboratory Study of Minerals
1.5
E&ES220
E&ES221
Geomorphology
and Geomorphology Laboratory
1.5
E&ES223
E&ES224
Structural Geology
and Field Geology
1.5
E&ES280 Introduction to GIS 1
E&ES313
E&ES314
Petrogenesis of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
and Laboratory Study of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks
1.5
E&ES317
E&ES318
Volcanology
and Volcanology Lab Course
1.5
E&ES321 Planetary Evolution 1
E&ES385
E&ES386
Remote Sensing
and Remote-Sensing Laboratory
1.5
E&ES497 Senior Seminar 1.5

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Economics

All students majoring in economics must complete a minimum of eight graded courses numbered 200 or above. Of these eight, three must be the core courses ECON300, ECON301, and ECON302. Of the five electives, three must be upper-tier courses, numbered 303 to 399, or ECON409. No more than one senior thesis, individual, or group tutorial may be counted toward fulfillment of the major. The teaching apprenticeship tutorials, ECON491 and ECON492, may not be counted toward the major. ECON110, ECON300, ECON301, and ECON302 must be taken at Wesleyan; no more than two elective courses taken elsewhere may be counted toward the economics major. Courses taken elsewhere must be approved by the department chair prior to enrollment and will generally be designated as lower-tier electives if approved. If the course material warrants counting a course taken elsewhere (or a tutorial numbered 401, 402, 411, or 412) as an upper-tier elective, the student must submit materials from that course (or tutorial) to the department chair along with a petition requesting that it be treated as an upper-tier elective immediately upon return to campus (or upon completion of the tutorial). University requirements for graduation permit a student to count no more than 16 credits in any one department toward the 32 courses required for graduation. The teaching apprenticeship tutorials, ECON491 and ECON492, are included in these totals for the purpose of determining oversubscription in a department.

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English

The English major at Wesleyan consists of 10 full-credit courses at the 200-level or higher, or the equivalent of partial credit courses. All but three of these credits, and all courses taken to meet the literary history, literatures of difference, and theory requirements, must be taken at Wesleyan or in the department’s Sussex Program. With approval of a major advisor, one upper-level course from outside the department that bears on the study of literature may also be counted toward the minimum 10 credits. Appropriate credits transferred from other institutions may also be counted toward the 10-credit requirement.

A major program consists of the gateway course, ENGL201 Ways of Reading, and three overlapping sets of courses: requirements, concentration, and electives.

Required courses. In addition to ENGL201 Ways of Reading, one course of each must be taken in the following areas:

  • Literary History I
  • Literary History II
  • Literatures of Difference
  • Theory 

Descriptions are available on the department website.

Concentration. Four courses in any one of these specialized areas of study:

  • American Literature
  • British Literature
  • Creative Writing
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Theory and Literary Forms 

Descriptions are available on the department website.

Electives. Other courses numbered 200 or higher. One FYS in English may be counted as a major elective.

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Environmental Studies (Linked Major)

A total of six elective courses are required; two must be at the upper level of academic study (usually 300 level or higher), and one elective must come from each of the three following core areas:

Core Electives Area 1

ENVS214 Women, Animals, Nature 1
ENVS230 The Simple Life 1
ENVS305 Moral Ecologies and the Anthropology of Vitality                                     1
ENVS307 The Economy of Nature and Nations 1
PHIL212 Introduction to Ethics 1
PHIL215 Humans, Animals, Nature 1
PHIL270 Environmental Philosophy 1

Core Electives Area 2

ECON212 The Economics of Sustainable Development, Vulnerability, and Resilience 1
ENVS285 Environmental Law and Policy 1
ENVS325 Healthy Places: Practice, Policy, and Population Health 1
GOVT206 Public Policy 1
GOVT221 Environmental Policy 1
GOVT322 Global Environmental Politics 1

Core Electives Area 3

BIOL216 Ecology 1
BIOL220 Conservation Biology 1
BIOL226 Invasive Species: Biology, Policy, and Management                               1
E&ES234 Geobiology 1
E&ES250 Environmental Geochemistry 1
E&ES260 Oceans and Climate 1
ENVS340 The Forest Ecosystem 1
ENVS361 Living in a Polluted World 1

Students will choose an additional three electives with their ENVS advisor. These electives may be selected from the entire list, in addition to those courses listed in core elective areas 1–3 above. Three of the elective courses must constitute a disciplinary or thematic concentration including at least one upper-level course (usually at the 300 level). Thematic concentrations are encouraged to be interdisciplinary. Courses selected from the three core areas above may be used as part of the concentration. Students are encouraged to develop their own thematic concentrations that require approval by their ENVS advisor. The following are some possible examples.

Example 1—Conservation

BIOL216 Ecology 1
BIOL220 Conservation Biology                                                                         1
E&ES234 Geobiology 1

Example 2—Food SUSTAINABILITY

ENVS135 American Food 1
ENVS226 Invasive Species: Biology, Policy, and Management                              1
ENVS235 Science of Sustainability 1

Example 3—Climate Change 1

E&ES260 Oceans and Climate 1
ECON310 Environmental and Resource Economics                                               1
GOVT221 Environmental Policy 1

Example 4—Climate Change 2

E&ES260 Oceans and Climate 1
E&ES359 Global Climate Change                                                                       1
GOVT221 Environmental Policy 1

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Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Students are assigned to faculty advisors and should familiarize themselves with requirements for writing a senior honors thesis, since these may affect curricular choices for the junior year. In the fall semester of the junior year, the student ordinarily takes FGSS209. During this semester the student, in consultation with the advisor, develops a major proposal that lists the courses that will compose the student’s major course of study, including a written rationale for the student’s chosen concentration within the major. The Major Proposal Form, approved by the advisor and with the concentration rationale attached, is submitted to the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program office by the end of the fall semester of the junior year.

The concentration rationale is a brief explanation (500 words) of the student’s chosen concentration within the major and describes the courses the student has chosen to constitute it. The major as a whole consists of 10 courses as follows: Three core courses (a gateway course, FGSS209 and FGSS405), two distribution courses (FGSS courses from an area outside the concentration), the four courses comprising the concentration, and senior research in the form of the senior essay or senior honors thesis. The senior year is devoted to completion of the coursework for the concentration, work on a senior essay or thesis, and participation in the senior seminar. Only two credits transferred from another institution may be applied to the major.

Every major must take the following courses:

  • One gateway course. These are designated annually and serve as introductions to the interdisciplinary field of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. Gateway courses examine gender as a factor in the politics and practices of the production of knowledge and of social and cultural life, with particular attention to the intersection of gender with other identity categories and modes of power—race, class, sexuality, and ethnicity.
  • FGSS209. This course traces contemporary developments in feminist theory and considers how feminism has been articulated in relation to theories of representation, subjectivity, history, sexuality, technology, and globalization, among others, paying particular attention to the unstable nexus of gender, sexual, racial, and class differences.
  • FGSS405. Set up as a workshop, the goal of this course is to develop an enabling and challenging intellectual environment for majors to work through intensively the theoretical, methodological, and practical concerns connected with their senior research projects.

Core courses

Gateway and required Courses

In 2017–2018, these include

FGSS200 Sex/Gender in Critical Perspective (FGSS Gateway) 1
FGSS205 #Sayhername: Intersectionality and Feminist Activism (FGSS Gateway) 1
FGSS209 Feminist Theories 1
FGSS269 Gender and History (FGSS Gateway) 1
FGSS405 Senior Seminar 1

Distribution requirement. A distribution requirement of two FGSS courses that must be from two different disciplines and should not overlap in their content with courses that make up the student’s concentration in the major.

Concentration. Four courses forming the area of concentration should represent a coherent inquiry into some issue, period, area, discipline, or intellectual approach related to feminist, gender, and/or sexuality studies. Normally, the courses will be drawn from various departmental offerings and will be selected in consultation with an advisor.

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Film Studies

  • All students must take two designated prerequisite courses and earn a grade of B+ or better in each to be eligible for the major.
  • After entry to the major, students must take the required production course.
  • Students must also take a minimum of six film studies electives.
  • Students may count a maximum of 16 credits in any single department toward the 32 credits required for graduation. Credits that exceed this limit will count as oversubscription.

Additional Options

Selection of options is dependent upon students not exceeding 16 total film credits (the maximum allowed in any department by the University prior to oversubscription).

  • Students have the OPTION to take two senior theses courses for an honors project (one in fall, one in spring).
  • Students have the OPTION to take up to three additional film/digital production courses. (Note that a senior thesis film counts as two additional production courses.)
  • Students have the OPTION to take up to three additional screenwriting/television writing courses. (Note that a senior thesis screenplay/teleplay counts as two screenwriting/television writing courses.)
  • Note that OPTIONAL COURSES count toward graduation but not toward fulfillment of the major.

Please see our departmental website for further information regarding the specifics of our major (wesleyan.edu/filmstudies/).

Please be aware that cross-listed courses must be counted in all departments in which they are listed.

Course offerings vary from year to year and not all courses are available in every year. With prior approval by the department chair, one history/theory course from another institution may be transferred to the Wesleyan major. The department does not offer group or individual tutorials other than senior thesis projects, but uncredited opportunities to work on individual senior films are available. Consult the chair of film studies for further details. The Film Studies Department does not offer credit for internships.

Students may become involved in film studies in ways other than class enrollment. The College of Film and the Moving Image houses the Wesleyan Cinema Archives. The Film Board (composed of Wesleyan students) runs the Wesleyan Film Series. The College of Film also hosts the Wesleyan Freshman/Sophomore Filmmaking Club.

Prerequisite Classes

FILM304 History of World Cinema to the 1960s 1
FILM307 The Language of Hollywood: Styles, Storytelling, and Technology           1

Required Courses After Entry into the Major

FILM450 Sight and Sound Workshop (in junior year) 1
A department-designated seminar during senior year or a senior thesis project        
1

Required Film Studies Electives 

Select a minimum of six of the following: 6
The History of Spanish Cinema
Film Noir
Directorial Style: Classic American Film Comedy
Myth and Ideology in Cinema: Hollywood Sex, Race, Class, Culture
Television Storytelling: The Conditions of Narrative Complexity
The New German Cinema
Alfred Hitchcock
Visual Storytelling: The History and Art of Hollywood's Master Storytellers
The Art and Business of Contemporary Film
Videogames as/and the Moving Image: Art, Aesthetics, and Design
Cinema of Adventure and Action
The History of the American Film Industry in the Studio Era
Contemporary East Asian Cinema
Melodrama and the Woman's Picture
Postwar American Independent Cinema
Contemporary International Art Cinema
From Caligari to Hitler: Weimar Cinema in Context
Newest German (and Austrian) Cinema
Philosophy and the Movies: The Past on Film
Elia Kazan's Films and Archives
Frank Capra's Films and Archives
Using the Moving Image Archive
The Art of Film Criticism
Martin Scorsese
The Documentary Film
The Long and the Short: Fritz Lang in Berlin and Hollywood
Seminar on Television Series and Aesthetics
Advanced Global Film Auteurs
Film Genres: The Western
History of Film Sound

Optional Film/Digital Production Courses

Select a maximum of three of the following: 3
Video Art
Documentary Filmmaking for Majors and Minors
Advanced Filmmaking (Fall - must be taken with FILM457)
Advanced Filmmaking (Spring - must be taken with FILM456)                

Optional Film/Television Writing Courses

Select a maximum of three of the following: 3
Senior Thesis Tutorial (Fall - must be taken with FILM410)
Senior Thesis Tutorial (Spring - must be taken with FILM409)                
Writing About Film
Screenwriting
Writing for Television
Visual Storytelling: Screenwriting
Scripting Series for the Small Screen

Note: The oversubscription rule limits students to a maximum of 16 credits in a single department before oversubscription occurs, at which point further credits earned in the department cannot count toward the 32 credits required for graduation.

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French Studies

The major consists of a minimum of eight courses:

  • Four FREN courses numbered 220-399.
    • FREN215 or the equivalent is the prerequisite for all FREN courses numbered 220 or higher.
    • Courses numbered 220-299 are introductory courses intended for students who have completed FREN215, who have taken an equivalent course elsewhere, or who have placed out of FREN215 through the placement test. In general, these courses are designed for students who have not yet studied abroad in a French-speaking country.
    • 300-level courses are upper-level courses intended for students who have already completed two courses in French beyond FREN215 or who have studied abroad in a French-speaking country for at least a semester.
  • Four other courses whose content is devoted substantially to the study of French or Francophone literature, history, culture, or society. These courses may be in French or English and may include:
    • Courses from the French section’s normal offering of 200- or 300-level courses.
    • Courses listed FIST (French, Italian, Spanish in translation).
    • Courses taken through approved study-abroad programs.
    • Courses offered by other departments and programs on campus that treat French or Francophone culture, politics, or history. These courses must be approved by the student’s major advisor.

A minimum grade of B is required for courses taken on campus to count toward the FRST major or the Romance studies RMST major where the student is combining French with one or two other Romance cultures.

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German Studies

The major requires satisfactory completion of nine credits worth of courses. At least five credits must be earned in courses taught in German above the level of GRST211, with at least three of the five being GRST seminars at the 300-level or courses taken in Germany. We encourage students to participate in our approved programs in Berlin or Hamburg. Up to four credits earned there typically count toward the major, provided the subject matter is relevant to German studies, the instruction and assignments are in German, and the major advisor has given prior approval. Students who choose to spend an entire year in Germany should consult with the department in advance to ascertain how many courses will count toward the major.

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Government

Basic requirements

  • To complete the major requires nine approved government credits
  • You may count toward the major only one introductory course (GOVT151, GOVT155, GOVT157, or GOVT159)
  • Five of the eight remaining courses must be upper-level Wesleyan GOVT courses in the range 201-399
  • The remaining three courses numbered 201 or higher may be:
    •  Tutorials in the Government Department (maximum two; only one thesis tutorial may count)
    •  A course in a “cognate” discipline (maximum one; must be approved in advance by your advisor)
    •  Political science courses at other U.S. institutions or abroad (maximum two; or three in a year of study abroad)
    •  Additional Wesleyan government courses in the range 201-399

The following may not count toward the major:

  • Student forum courses
  • Teaching apprenticeships
  • First-year seminars except FYS versions of GOVT151, GOVT155, GOVT157, or GOVT159, which count the same as the regular versions of each course
  • Internships either in the United States or abroad
  • The Government Department does not grant credit or waive prerequisites for Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, or courses taken on ad-hoc programs (e.g., summer study abroad) prior to matriculation at Wesleyan. The only pre-matriculation credits that the department will accept are the government (political science, politics, etc.) credits that the University has authorized from a transfer student's previous full-time institution.

Majors must choose and complete a concentration:

  • Four courses, at least three of which must be taken at Wesleyan, complete a concentration as follows:
    • American politics: GOVT151 and three upper-level American politics courses
    • International politics: GOVT155 and three upper-level international politics courses
    • Comparative politics: GOVT157 and three upper-division comparative politics courses
    • Political theory: Any four political theory courses

Breadth Across the Discipline:

  • In addition to taking four courses within the chosen concentration, majors are required to take at least one course each in at least two of the three subfields outside the concentration. This requirement assures that majors acquire breadth across the discipline as well as depth in at least one subfield.

General Education Expectations

  • Stage 2 must be complete to receive honors in government.

Pacing

  • Majors with fewer than four government courses by the end of the junior year must drop the major.

For more information, please visit the department's majoring page.

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Hispanic Literatures and Cultures

  • Nine (9) courses minimum numbered 203 and above. Students who count SPAN 203 must also take SPAN 221.
  • Five (5) courses minimum in SPAN at Wesleyan numbered 221 or above. At least one in each of the following categories:
    • Before 1700 (Medieval, Spanish Golden Age or colonial Latin America, normally SPAN230-249);
    • Post-1700 Spain (normally SPAN250-269);
    • Post-1800 Latin America (normally SPAN270-299).
  • One (1) course in SPAN at Wesleyan during their senior year.
  • An average grade of B or better in courses taken for the major. Exceptions require the approval of the Spanish section.

Tutorials (for course assistants, essays, or honors) do not count toward the major.

Languages courses taken abroad do not count toward the major.

Courses in Related Fields.

Courses taken in Spanish on selected programs abroad may count toward the major if they have a strong interpretive dimension, with a focus on reading, writing, discussion, representation, or form (e.g., how genre, rhetoric, and/or style shape meaning). Such courses may also treat the subject’s history or the debates within it. Courses that meet these criteria are ordinarily found in anthropology, art history, history, music, philosophy, and sociology. They can also be found in economics, government, and psychology when the course focuses primarily on how the field is represented, conceived, or used in public debates or contexts.

Courses offered through the medium of English by other Wesleyan departments and programs primarily on the Hispanophone (including the U.S. Hispanic) world may count toward the major. These courses must be approved by the student’s major advisor.

With the advisor’s approval, majors may count courses in related fields as follows:

  • For students who do not study abroad, up to two (2) courses through the medium of English.
  • For students who study abroad, four (4) courses maximum on selected programs abroad and one (1) course through the medium of English at Wesleyan.
Important Additional Information.

Courses must be taken for a letter grade, unless the student is also majoring in COL.

Students majoring in both HISP and LAST may count no more than four (4) courses toward satisfying requirements of both majors concurrently.

Advising. Upon acceptance into the major, students will meet with their assigned HISP advisor in order to review their plan for completing the major. Advisees will meet with the advisor at least once each semester for the purpose of revising their progress and discussing any other matters related to their interest and goals in Spanish.

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History

Requirements for the HISTORY MAJOR FOR THE CLASS of 2018 and 2019

What next?
The breadth of topics covered by the Department of History allows students to create geographic, thematic, or chronological unity in their own unique course of study. A history major will develop two concentrations by choosing four courses from each of two thematic modules. (The full list of modules is provided below.)

To be a history major, you need eleven credits; at least eight must be history credits in two modules. There are no prerequisites to declare a history major.

There is only one required course for all history majors: HIST362. It is offered only in the fall and should be taken in your junior year.

What counts?

  • At least eight of the 11 courses must be history courses, and at least two of those should be history seminars.
  • You may also count one first-year seminar (HIST 100-149) and one senior research tutorial toward the major.
  • Two courses taken outside of Wesleyan, for example, during the semester abroad, may be included among the history courses.
  • Up to three courses in other departments, programs, or colleges may be counted toward the total of 11 required courses with the approval of the student’s advisor.  

Is there a senior research project? 
Yes. See the Honors/Capstone section for more details.

What are the modules?
Modules are fields of concentration that provide a thematic, geographic, or chronological unity for the courses you take for the history major. Any one course may belong to several modules, but for the major it may be counted only toward one module; any non-history course counted toward the 11 courses required for the major must be within a module. HIST362 cannot be included in any module, but the two additional seminars required for the major must be.

Students consult with their advisors to identify the modules and the courses needed to complete the major. With advisor approval, students may occasionally create their own coherent module.

The modules reveal the richness and depth of the history curriculum. The department offers modules in many subjects and you can also fashion your own. In fact, over 40 different modules have been pursued by students. For a fuller description, go to Descriptions of Modules. Some of the currently popular modules include:

  • Europe
  • North America
  • Empires & Encounters
  • Revolutions & Social Movements
  • War & Violence
  • Visual Arts & Culture
  • Religion
  • Thought & Ideas
  • Economy & Society
  • Contemporary History
  • Nation & Ethnicity

You may also go to the Department of History's Modules page for more information.

Requirements for the History Major for the class of 2020 and beyond

In general: The major program in history consists of at least nine history courses. These must include one Introduction to History course (numbered from 150-189), normally taken as a freshman or sophomore, and eight other courses, numbered 200 or higher. Students must also complete two modules and do a capstone research requirement.

In detail, a major will have:

  • nine history courses, including
    • one Introduction to History course numbered between 150-189, normally taken as a freshman or sophomore at Wesleyan
    • A minimum of eight other HIST courses, including the following:
      • All majors must include at least one course focused on the period before 1800 in their nine HIST courses. It can also count toward a module.
      • HIST362, the required seminar that all majors must take, typically during the fall semester of the junior year
      • two other HIST seminars, numbered 300 or above, taken at Wesleyan
      • Note that only two history courses taken outside of Wesleyan may be counted toward the nine required history courses and these will count as non-seminar classes.
  • Modules: Students pursue two modules, each composed of four courses with a thematic, geographic, or chronological unity, assembled from both history and non-history department courses. Students may create their own modules, but most select their modules from the large list prepared by the department faculty. In either case, students work closely with their advisors to identify their modules and the specific courses that are at the core of their major programs.
    • Here are a few things to remember about the courses in your modules:
      • A course may be used in only one of a student's modules.
      • Most courses in modules will be HIST courses, but up to three courses from other departments or programs may count towards the modules.
      • HIST362 cannot be included in any module.
      • Pre-1800 courses may count towards modules.

        Research Project: Every major must complete a substantial research project completed at Wesleyan under departmental faculty supervision.

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Italian Studies

  • Nine courses above the level of ITAL102 (i.e., ITAL111 and higher) are required. Sophomores who are satisfactorily completing ITAL102 and intend to pursue Italian will be admitted to the major even though that course does not itself count for the major;
  • All courses that count toward the major must be taken for a grade. Normally, only courses passed with a B or better will count for the major. Students are expected to request permission from the Italian section to count courses with a lower grade toward the major;
  • Essay, thesis, and other (e.g., CA/TA) tutorials and language courses do not count toward the major, although they are encouraged;
  • One of the nine required courses may be taken in English;
  • For students placing into ITAL221 or higher, three of the nine required courses may be  taken in English;
  • One course in Italian at Wesleyan following study abroad is required;
  • All students are required to take at least one course for the major in their senior year.

Additional Information

  • The Italian major is designed to allow students to start Italian at Wesleyan in their first or second year and complete the major. Completion is further helped by spending one semester abroad in Italy through the ECCO program or another program.
  • Students are highly encouraged to satisfy the post study-abroad course requirement in the semester they return to campus.
  • Four credits from the ECCO program in Bologna are accepted: Only one of these may be on a topic that is not Italian in nature (i.e., economy of Russia taken at the UniBo).
  • Lecce credit is accepted only for students who have completed ITAL102 only before study abroad.
  • If a student attends a study-abroad program other than ECCO, a review of the number of credits that will be accepted into the major is required.

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Latin American Studies

Twelve semester courses are required to complete the LAST major, (1) six in LAST and at least six in a department of concentration; or (2) seven in LAST and five in a department concentration. The five or six courses in the concentration need not be cross-listed with LAST. Acceptable departments of concentration are those with an affiliated LAST faculty member, currently anthropology, economics, earth and environmental sciences, government, history, music, religion, sociology, Romance languages and literatures, and theater. With the approval of the chair, students may concentrate in other departments that have faculty members with substantial knowledge of and interest in Latin America and/or the Caribbean. LAST majors may not concentrate in another program (e.g., AMST) or in a college (e.g., CSS).

Mandatory LAST courses at Wesleyan. Of the 12 courses required to complete the LAST major, at least eight must be taken at Wesleyan. On petition to the chair, an exception may be made for (1) students who transferred to Wesleyan and who seek LAST major credit for courses taken at their previous institution(s) or (2) students participating in the Twelve-College Exchange Program who seek LAST major credit for courses taken at one of the other participating colleges.

  • Of the 12 courses required to complete the LAST major, two are mandatory: LAST226 and LAST245. Each of these mandatory courses must be taken at Wesleyan.
  • One additional LAST-cross-listed social science course is also mandatory. It, too, must be taken at Wesleyan.
  • LAST majors must also complete stage II of the General Education Expectations.

To graduate as a LAST major, students must maintain an average of B- or better in all courses taken at Wesleyan that are cross-listed in the LAST major, whether or not the student elects to place these courses on the major certification form.

Non-LAST courses at Wesleyan that may count toward the LAST major. In exceptional circumstances, Wesleyan courses that have significant Latin American content but are not cross-listed with LAST may count toward the major. Students must petition the LAST chair to obtain LAST major credit for such courses.

Courses at Wesleyan that may NOT count toward the LAST major.

  • No Spanish language courses except SPAN221 may count toward the LAST major—only Spanish literature courses.
  • No 100-level Spanish courses will be accepted for credit toward the LAST major.
  • No more than one music course involving primarily or exclusively performance may count toward the LAST major.
  • No student forum courses may count toward the LAST major. Also, LAST does not sponsor student forum courses.
  • No more than one introductory (100-level) course in a student’s department of concentration may count toward the LAST major.
  • No more than one thesis tutorial credit may count toward the LAST major.

Courses taken at other institutions in the United States. No course taken at another institution in United States may count toward the LAST major, whether taken during the summer or during the academic year. On petition to the chair, an exception may be made (1) for students who transferred to Wesleyan and who seek LAST major credit for courses taken at their previous institution(s) or (2) for students participating in the Twelve-College Exchange Program who seek LAST major credit for courses taken at one of the other participating colleges.

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Mathematics

  • A year of differential and integral calculus (typically MATH121 and MATH122)
  • MATH221 or MATH223
  • MATH222
  • An elementary knowledge of algorithms and computer programming. (Success­ful completion of either COMP112 or COMP211 satisfies this requirement.)
  • MATH261 and MATH225
  • A coherent selection of four additional electives, chosen in consultation with an advisor from the department. Any MATH course at the 200+ level can be used as an elective for the major.

Notes:

  • Students who have completed a year of calculus in high school may place out of one or both of MATH121 and MATH122.
  • An AP score of 4 or 5 on the AB calculus exam indicates the student should begin in MATH122.
  • An AP score of 4 or 5 on the BC calculus exam indicates the student should consider beginning in any of MATH221, MATH222, or MATH223.
  • Students may not earn credit for both MATH221 and MATH223.
  • Students must complete either MATH228 or MATH261 by the end of their junior year.
  • With advance approval from the departmental advisory committee, mild adjustments are allowed. For example, a Wesleyan course with substantial mathematical content but that is not listed in MATH may be used toward the four-electives requirement. Please note, however, that both MATH225 and MATH261 must be taken at Wesleyan to complete the major, and substitutions for these courses will not be approved.

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Medieval Studies

Each student concentrating in medieval studies will be guided by a principal advisor within the field of specialization and two other faculty members from other fields of medieval studies. In some cases a consulting faculty member may be chosen from a field that is not an integral part of medieval studies but that is closely related to the student’s main area of interest (e.g., classics, linguistics). At the beginning of the fifth semester, each student is expected to submit for approval by his or her advisor a tentative schedule of courses to be taken to fulfill the requirements of the major. Subsequent changes in this schedule may be made only with the approval of the advisor.

Medieval studies majors take classes in a broad range of fields, including art history, archaeology, history, languages and literature, music history, manuscript studies, and religious studies. They are required to take 10 upper-level courses that will normally conform to the following:

  • Four courses in the student’s chosen field of specialization
  • Two courses in a second field of medieval studies
  • One course in a third distinct field of medieval studies
  • Three additional courses in any area of medieval studies, or in an outside field deemed, in consultation with the advisor, to be closely related to the student’s work in subject matter or method. For example, a student specializing in medieval history may count toward the major a course in ancient history or historical method, while a student specializing in medieval literature may include a course in classical literature or in the theory of literary criticism.

A student may take more than four courses in his/her primary area of specialization, but only four will be counted toward the major.

At least one of the courses in the primary area of specialization should be a seminar, as should at least one of the courses in either the second or third fields.

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Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

The molecular biology and biochemistry major requires the following course work:

Introductory Courses
MB&B181
MB&B191
Principles of Biology I: Cell Biology and Molecular Basis of Heredity
and Principles of Biology I--Laboratory
1.5
MB&B182
MB&B192
Principles of Biology II
and Principles of Biology II--Laboratory
1.5
General Chemistry
CHEM141/143 Introductory Chemistry I 1
CHEM142/144 Introductory Chemistry II 1
CHEM152 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory 0.25
Gateway Molecular Biology
MB&B208 Molecular Biology 1
Organic Chemistry
CHEM251 Principles of Organic Chemistry I 1
CHEM252 Principles of Organic Chemistry II 1
Mathematics
Select one Mathematics course (calculus or statistics recommended) 1
Physical Chemistry
MB&B381 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences 1
Biochemistry
MB&B383 Biochemistry 1
Advanced Laboratory
MB&B394 Advanced Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Genetics 1
or MB&B395 Structural Biology Laboratory
Electives
Select two elective courses, at least one of which must be a 300-level MB&B course 2

Students are encouraged to take a seminar course, MB&B209, in the spring of the first or sophomore year.

Two consecutive semesters of research for credit (in the same laboratory) (MB&B421, MB&B422 ) with an MB&B faculty member (or a preapproved faculty member in another department conducting research in molecular biology/biochemistry/biophysics) can be substituted for the 200-level elective. Honors thesis (MB&B409 and MB&B410) does not count as an elective.

MB&B381 may be replaced by two semesters of introductory or general physics (PHYS111/PHYS113 and PHYS112/PHYS116) or physical chemistry (CHEM337 and CHEM338). In this case MB&B381 may count as the required 300-level elective.

For potential elective courses outside of MB&B, including study-abroad courses, students must consult with their faculty advisor and the MB&B chair in a timely manner. 

Majors interested in a concentration in molecular biology should take MB&B394, which is offered every spring semester and generally taken in the junior or senior year. Students interested in the molecular biophysics certificate should take MB&B395, which is offered every other year in fall semester.

MB&B majors are also encouraged to attend the MB&B/biology seminars (Thursdays at noon), the chemistry colloquium (Fridays at 3:30 p.m.), and/or the biological chemistry seminars (Mondays at 4 p.m.), wherein distinguished scientists from other institutions are invited to present their research to our community.

Note: Many MB&B majors take 200- and 300-level courses over the curriculum requirement to better prepare for graduate or medical school.

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Music

Music majors take four courses in each of three capabilities: theory/composition, history/culture, and performance. Two additional courses from the MUSC300-level Seminars for Music Majors bring the number of music credits to 14. The required senior project or senior honors thesis brings the total number of music credits to 15 or 16, respectively.  Diversity of musical experience is a core value of the Music Department and is expected of all music majors. To move toward this goal, at least two of the 14 music credits must be outside the student’s main area of interest.

The Music Department expects its majors to continue to refine and extend their performance skills throughout their undergraduate careers, which may mean accumulating more than 15 or 16 credits in music. No more than 16 credits in music may be counted toward the 32 credits required for graduation, however, and students must therefore complete 16 or 17 credits outside of music.

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Neuroscience and Behavior

Foundation courses

Core course

Advanced courses

Five advanced courses from the following list are required for students; two must be cross-listed with biology; two cross-listed with psychology; and one, a research tutorial or methodological course.

Cross-listed with biology

  • NS&B224 Hormones, Brain, and Behavior
  • NS&B239 Functional Anatomy of the Human Brain
  • NS&B245 Cellular Neurophysiology
  • NS&B249 Neuroethology
  • NS&B252 Cell Biology of the Neuron
  • NS&B254 Comparative Animal Behavior
  • NS&B299 Waves, Brains, and Music
  • NS&B303 Receptors, Channels, and Pumps: Advanced Topics in Membrane Protein Structure and Function
  • NS&B317 Neuroethics
  • NS&B325 Stem Cells: Basic Biology to Clinical Application
  • NS&B328 Chemical Senses
  • NS&B343 Muscle and Nerve Development
  • NS&B345 Developmental Neurobiology
  • NS&B347 Mammalian Cortical Circuits
  • NS&B351 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
  • NS&B353 Neurobiology of Neurological Disorders
  • NS&B356 Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Cross-listed with psychology

  • NS&B220 Cognitive Psychology
  • NS&B222 Sensation and Perception
  • NS&B225 Cognitive Neuroscience
  • NS&B227 Motivation and Reward
  • NS&B228 Clinical Neuropsychology
  • NS&B239 Functional Anatomy of the Human Brain
  • NS&B308 Psychology of Action
  • NS&B316 Schizophrenia and Its Treatment: Neuroscientific, Historical, and Phenomenological Perspectives
  • NS&B317 Neuroethics
  • NS&B329 Neural Costs of War
  • NS&B341 Psychology of Learning and Memory
  • NS&B342 Music Perception and Cognition
  • NS&B348 Origins of Knowledge
  • NS&B353 Neurobiology of Neurological Disorders
  • NS&B356 Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Research methods and practica

  • BIOL320 Quantitative Methods for the Biological and Environmental Sciences
  • MATH132 Elementary Statistics
  • NS&B210 Research Methods in Cognition
  • NS&B215 Research Methods: Behavioral Methods in Animal Research
  • NS&B243 Neurohistology
  • NS&B247 Laboratory in Neurophysiology
  • NS&B250 Laboratory in Cellular and Behavioral Neurobiology
  • NS&B280 Applied Data Analysis
  • NS&B383 Advanced Research in Learning and Memory
  • NS&B390 Experimental Investigations into Reading
  • NS&B392 Behavioral Methods in Affective Neuroscience
  • NS&B398 Advanced Research in Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience
  • NS&B399 Lab in Gambling, Drugs, and Junk Food
  • NS&B409/NS&B410 Senior Thesis Tutorial or NS&B423/NS&B424 Advanced Research Seminar for two semesters, both in the lab of the same faculty member
  • PSYC200 Statistics: An Activity-Based Approach

Note: MATH132 can be taken to meet requirements for either the methodological or foundation major requirements, but not both.  Methodological courses cannot be credited toward the requirements of advanced courses cross-listed with biology or psychology. 

Courses of relevance outside the program. Though not requirements of the major, students should be aware that courses in organic chemistry and molecular biology, as well as courses in non-neuroscience areas of biology and psychology, complement the NS&B major and should be considered, in consultation with your advisor, when planning your program of study. 

Substituting outside courses for credit to the major

Foundation courses: A student who has taken foundation courses outside of Wesleyan may be able to apply them to the major. As a general rule, courses acceptable to the biology, chemistry, and physics departments for university credit are acceptable to the NS&B program for substitution for foundation courses.

Advanced courses: Advanced courses, inside or outside of the University, might be acceptable as substitutes for the advanced courses of the NS&B major. In general, only one such course can be substituted, and approval must be obtained in advance from the program director.

Undergraduate research

NS&B majors are encouraged to become involved in the research of the faculty. Research tutorials and senior thesis tutorials are taken with mode of grading and amount of credit to be arranged with the research supervisor. Research tutorials are numbered NS&B411/NS&B412, NS&B409/NS&B410, and NS&B423/NS&B424. These courses can fulfill the research methods requirement or can receive graduation credit.  For the most up-to-date information on NS&B faculty research, please visit our department website.

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Philosophy

The philosophy major at Wesleyan offers two tracks: a general philosophy track and a social justice track. Both tracks require at least ten courses, including eight PHIL courses.

  • The general philosophy track encourages students to explore a range of issues and approaches from various historical periods and cultural traditions.
  • The social justice track emphasizes philosophers’ roles not only as theorists but also as agents of social and political change. Philosophical methods of conceptual and contextual analyses and careful argumentation provide important tools for grappling with real-world injustices. The social justice track supports students in tailoring their philosophical understanding and skills around a particular concern in an area of social justice, such as human rights, equality, social responsibility, environmental justice, etc.

GENERAL TRACK

Distribution
1 History
1 Value
1 Mind & Reality
Concentration
None required
Advanced
2 seminars taken as juniors/seniors
Electives
5 electives, including up to 2 non-PHIL
Thesis Project
Optional
Of the ten courses counted toward the general-track major, at least eight must be offered by the Philosophy Department; as many as two may be given in other departments or programs (e.g., College of Letters, Religion) that are relevant to the student’s program of studies in philosophy and are approved as such by the philosophy faculty.

In addition, students must satisfy the following:

  • Distribution requirement. Students must count at least one course from each of the thematic areas (history, values, mind and reality).
  • Advanced course requirement. All students must complete at least two advanced philosophy courses, in any philosophical area, during their junior or senior years.

SOCIAL JUSTICE TRACK

Distribution
1 History -or- 1 Mind & Reality
Concentration
5 - course concentration, including 2 beyond PHIL
Advanced
2 seminars taken as juniors/seniors
Electives
2 electives from PHIL
Thesis project
Optional

At the core of the social justice major track is a social justice concentration that brings together a student’s specific interests in social justice. Majors will submit proposals for acceptance to the track that will include three philosophy courses and two non-philosophy courses that fit together in a coherent concentration.

Below are two sample concentrations:

Sample Concentration 1: Human Rights in China
Human Rights Across Cultures
Political Philosophy
Paternalism: Its Problems and Promise
Political Economy of Developing Countries
Politics and Political Development in the People's Republic of China

Sample Concentration 2: Challenging The Carceral State
Reasoning About Justice
History of Political Philosophy
The Ethics of Captivity
Critical Perspectives on the State
America in Prison: Theater Behind Bars

In addition to the five-course concentration, students must satisfy the following:

  • One core course in either history or mind and reality.
  • Advanced course requirement. All students must complete at least two advanced philosophy courses, in any area, during both their junior or senior years.
  • Two other philosophy electives.

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Physics

To major in physics, you must complete PHYS116 no later than the end of your sophomore year; if you can complete it by the end of your first year, it will give you more flexibility to construct your major. You should also have completed MATH121, MATH122, MATH221, and MATH222 by the end of your sophomore year. It is desirable for those students who are considering graduate work in physics or those who wish to pursue an intensive major to also complete PHYS213 and PHYS214 by the end of the sophomore year. You should note that a few of the advanced courses may not be offered every year, and you should plan your program of study accordingly.

To fulfill the major in physics, a student must complete the following:

  • Eight lecture courses, including (a) four core physics courses: PHYS213, PHYS214, PHYS316 and PHYS324 (note that PHYS324 requires MATH222); and (b) at least four other course credits at the 200, 300, or 500 level, not including the laboratory courses or MATH221 or MATH222. For most majors, the department strongly recommends PHYS315, followed in importance by PHYS313 and PHYS358
  • Two laboratory courses: PHYS342 and PHYS345. One of these two labs may be substituted by either one of the following three options:
    • PHYS340;
    • A 1-credit thesis tutorial (PHYS409 or PHYS410) with a physics faculty;
    • A 1-credit research tutorial (which may be taken as two .5-credit research tutorials) with a physics faculty.
  • Students planning graduate study in physics should take a minimum of 14 credits at the 200 level or higher in physics, mathematics, and computer science. PHYS313, PHYS315, and PHYS358 are essential. In addition, the department strongly recommends MATH222, MATH226, PHYS565, and MATH229. Graduate physics courses may be elected with permission, and experience in computer programming is also extremely valuable.
  • Students not planning graduate study in physics and who are interested in applying their knowledge of physics to other areas of the curriculum may choose up to four courses from other departments to satisfy requirement (b) above. This must be done in consultation with the physics major advisor, and the selections must constitute a coherent, coordinated program of study. Preapproved tracks are available to satisfy requirement (b).

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Psychology

Major Requirements

Ten psychology credits are required to fulfill the major. Nine of the 10 credits required for the major must be taken for a grade. Courses in introductory psychology and psychological statistics must be taken for a grade. Required elements of the major are introductory psychology (one credit), psychology statistics (one credit), research methods (one credit), one breadth course from each of three areas of psychology (three credits), a specialized course (one credit), and three additional elective credits that can come from any courses and tutorials associated with the major.

For the Class of 2018 and earlier: Major requirements include completion of

  • 10 full-credit courses that count toward the major requirements (nine of which must be taken graded);
  • General Education Expectations stages I and II;
  • second language proficiency; and
  • cultural-immersion experience.  

(This description includes the already-completed requirements for admission to the major.) All courses must be completed by the end of the senior year.

For the Class of 2019 and later: Major requirements include completion of

  • 10 full-credit courses that count toward the major requirements (nine of which must be taken graded); and
  • General Education Expectations stages I and II.

(This description includes the already-completed requirements for admission to the major.) All courses must be completed by the end of the senior year.

Introductory psychology

PSYC105, a lecture class that provides a broad overview of the field, is required for the major and should typically be the first course taken in the major. The course must be taken graded if used for the major. The course should be taken in the first or second year. One can alternatively transfer a psychology AP or IB credit in place of this course (see the Advanced Placement section). Only one can be counted toward the major.

Psychological statistics

A psychological statistics course provides an introduction to data analysis in psychology. PSYC200 or PSYC280 is typically used to fulfill this requirement, but ECON300 is acceptable as well. (For students in the Class of 2018 or earlier, MATH132 is also acceptable.)  The course must be taken graded if used for the major. A course in statistics should be taken in the first or second year (some research methods require statistics as a prerequisite). Only one may be counted toward the major.

Research methods

A research methods course trains specific skills for evaluating and performing research. Research methods courses are numbered PSYC202-219. Some of these courses are more general, while others are focused on particular applications as indicated by their titles. A 200-level course in research methods should be taken in the first or second year (some research methods require statistics as a prerequisite). (For students in the Class of 2018 or earlier: This requirement can alternatively be fulfilled with an advanced research course, PSYC370-399, but seats are more limited in the latter and they are really intended for students who have already taken a 200-level methods course.)

Breadth requirement

Students are expected to develop knowledge across the entire field of psychology. Toward this goal, students must choose a minimum of one course from each of the three columns below. These breadth courses (numbered PSYC220-280) can be taken throughout one’s four years. When possible, a student should start with breadth courses of particular interest so that he or she can later do more advanced work in these areas.

Column 1
Select a minimum of one of the following: 1
Cognitive Psychology
Human Memory
Sensation and Perception
Cognitive Neuroscience
Motivation and Reward
Clinical Neuropsychology
Functional Anatomy of the Human Brain
Behavioral Neurobiology
Column 2
Select a minimum of one of the following: 1
Developmental Psychology
Psychological Measurement
Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood
Personality
Psychopathology
Educational Psychology
Positive Psychology
Discovering the Person
Column 3
Select a minimum of one of the following: 1
Social Psychology
Cultural Psychology
Culture in Psychology: An Introduction to Theory and Research
Community Psychology
Health Psychology
The Psychology of Women
Psychology and the Law

Specialized

These courses (PSYC300-399) aim to ensure that students study at least one subfield of psychology in depth. These courses have a variety of formats, including seminars and advanced research labs, and admission is typically by permission of instructor. A student must take at least one specialized course that deepens the knowledge she or he gained in a breadth course.

Electives

To reach the 10 course credits necessary for the major, one may count any other courses, tutorials, or teaching apprenticeships offered by the department or creditable to the major with the exception that only one introductory psychology and one statistics course may be counted towards the major, and no more than two teaching assistantships and four tutorials (or six including senior thesis tutorials) may be counted towards the major. For electives, two half-credit courses may be used in place of one full-credit course. Some courses (cross-listed with psychology or hosted in other departments) can be used as electives for the major but fulfill no other requirements and cannot be used for admission to the major. See Department Majors Manual for details.

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Religion

To complete a major in religion, students are also required to take a minimum of 11 courses (10.25 credits) (with a maximum of 15.25, including thesis credits) numbered 200 or above.

The minimum of 11 courses (10.25 credits) will be distributed as follows:

  • RELI151, with a grade of B- or better
  • Four courses in three areas of historical traditions
  • Two courses in thematic approaches
  • Two courses in method and theory, one of which must be RELI398
  • A tenth course, which may be taken in any of these areas. Alternatively, the student can include one Hebrew course (HEBR202 or higher) or a different fourth-semester language course with substantial religion content (see the Language section, under Additional Information).
  • RELI404 (.25 credit)

Note: Although some courses may fit more than one category, they cannot be included more than once in the overall count of courses taken.

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Romance Studies

  • Determination of a major (five courses in your primary language) and minor (four courses in your secondary language) focus.
  • A minimum of two comparative projects. The idea is to suspend, for a moment, the nationalist assumption that languages and cultures exist in isolation from each other. Writers, artists, scientists, and businesspersons routinely cross borders and languages. We ask you to do the same in two short or long papers, to be completed at Wesleyan or during study abroad. A comparative project means simply that, in consultation with a course instructor, you will draw substantially on both your Romance major languages and cultures to explore a problem that interests you. The project could be about border-crossing movements, reception, influence or adaptation, intertextuality, or dialogue between languages, literatures, and/or cultures. Or it could be an exploration of an issue that interests you (the environment, health care, urban planning, food, science, queer identities, fashion, etc.) in cross-cultural perspective, drawing on both your major languages and cultures. The projects may also be more informal or essayistic reflections (the equivalent of two short papers in length) on something significant you have learned or a perspective gained through study of two languages and cultures that you are unlikely to have learned through English only, a single foreign language, or another major. These essays may draw on work or study abroad or on the multiple courses you have taken at Wesleyan in your major languages. They may be written in English or in one of your major languages. If you write in English you are expected to draw on sources in your major languages.
  • Nine courses at or above determined levels (FREN223, ITAL111, SPAN221) in two Romance languages.
  • At least one course taken in both in the student’s primary and your secondary languages following the study-abroad experience.
  • At least one course taken in both in the student’s primary and secondary languages in the student’s senior year.
  • Students are expected to earn a B or better in courses that count for the major. Students wishing to count a course with a lower grade toward the major are expected to consult with the chair of Romance Languages and Literatures (who will consult with the department) about it as soon as the grade is recorded.
  • Courses must be taken for a letter grade, unless the student is also majoring in COL.

Additional Information

  • Study abroad is expected to take place on a Wesleyan-sponsored study-abroad program. Alternatively, students may, with the advisor’s prior statement of support, study on another approved program. This practice is intended to promote the intellectual coherence of a major in which students acquire one language more recently than another.
  • Students may take one course in English centered on the culture of their primary language.
  • With the advisor’s approval, students may satisfy the comparative requirement by way of coursework and/or written work conducted on a study-abroad program.
  • Students whose primary language placement is higher than FREN215, ITAL112, SPAN221 are required to complete nine courses, two of which may be in English in the primary language’s culture only.
  • You may count up to three courses taken during study abroad toward the major. These courses may be taken in one or both of the major languages.
  • Except in rare circumstances, students may not double major in any of the majors sponsored by the Romance Languages and Literatures Department: RMST, SPAN, FRST, ITST.
  • Senior essays or theses must be comparative and involve the literatures and/or cultures of the student’s major languages.
  • Essay, thesis, and other (e.g., CA/TA) tutorials and language courses do not count toward the major, although they are encouraged.

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Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

There are two possible concentrations in the REES major.

  • Language, literature, and culture. Majors must complete three years of college-level Russian or the equivalent, as well as five more courses, three of which must be in literature or culture, one of which must be in either politics and economics or history and religion, and one of which must be either a course or a full-credit tutorial conducted in Russian. If a student places out of one or more semesters of language, he or she must take enough courses in REES to add up to a total of 11. For example, a student who places out of two semesters of first-year Russian would take four more semesters of language plus seven more courses.
  • Social sciences. Majors must complete two years of college-level Russian or the equivalent, as well as seven more courses chosen in consultation with an advisor. These courses must include at least one in the category of politics and economics, one in the category of history and religion, and one in the category of literature and culture. If a student places out of one or more semesters of language, he or she must take enough courses in REES to add up to a total of 11. For example, a student who places out of two semesters of first-year Russian would take two semesters of language plus nine more courses.

REES Courses

Politics and Economics

GOVT274 Russian Politics 1
History and Religion
HIST218 Imperial Russia, 1682-1917 1
HIST219 Russian and Soviet History, 1881 to the Present 1
RELI299 Imagining Communities: National Religions and Political Rituals 1
Literature and Culture in English
RUSS205 Murder and Adultery: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the 19th-Century Russian Novel 1
RUSS206 A Matter of Life and Death: Fiction in the Soviet Era 1
RUSS222 Dr. Jekyll vs. Dr. Frankenstein: Doubles in Literature 1
RUSS232 Life into Art: Joyce, Woolf, Nabokov 1
RUSS240 Reading Stories: Great Short Works from Tolstoy to Petrushevskaya 1
RUSS251 Dostoevsky 1
RUSS252 Tolstoy 1
RUSS255 Empire, Love, and War: 20th-Century Novels from Central and Eastern Europe 1
RUSS263 Nabokov and Cultural Synthesis 1
RUSS277 Gogol and His Legacy: Witches, Con Men, and Runaway Noses 1
THEA214 Theater of Anton Chekhov: Research, Analysis, and Performance 1
Literature in Russian
RUSS209 The Fantastic: Hoffmann and Gogol (Russian) 1
RUSS250 Pushkin 1
RUSS260 Dostoevsky's BRAT'IA KARAMAZOVY 1
Language
RUSS101
RUSS102
Elementary Russian I
and Elementary Russian II
3
RUSS201
RUSS202
Intermediate Russian I
and Intermediate Russian II
2
RUSS301
RUSS302
Third-Year Russian I
and Third-Year Russian II
2

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Science in Society

Students may enroll in the program either as a stand-alone major or as a joint major with one of the science departments (astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth and environmental sciences, molecular biology and biochemistry, neuroscience and behavior, physics, or psychology). All students must take one course each in history of science, philosophy of science, and sociocultural studies of science, along with three additional courses in the program (including at least one 300-level seminar). Students for whom the program is a stand-alone major must also take a minimum of four major-track courses in one of the science departments and a structured three-course area of concentration in either anthropology, FGSS, history, philosophy, religion, or sociology. Students who undertake the joint major with a science must complete all requirements for a science major in place of the area of concentration. Further information about program requirements, policies, and its learning goals can be found at wesleyan.edu/sisp.

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Sociology

Majors must complete a total of 10 courses in fulfillment of the major requirements; this includes the capstone requirement.

  • Four Sociology Department topical courses (SOC220-SOC412)
  • Three additional topical courses from any combination of:
    • SOC220-SOC325
    • SOC401 or SOC402 (Sociology Department individual tutorials, including education in the field)
    • SOC411 or SOC412 (Sociology Department group tutorials)
    • Advisor-approved courses taken outside the Wesleyan Sociology Department, including study-abroad credit, sociology-relevant courses at Wesleyan, and sociology courses taken at other institutions.

All sociology majors must enter their senior year having taken a minimum of three courses within the Wesleyan Sociology Department. This includes at least one of the two required courses (SOC202 or SOC212).

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Theater

  • One course in scenic, costume, or lighting design.
  • THEA302. Please note that certain courses in departments may fulfill one of two theater history prerequisites (the gateway THEA203 or THEA302) only if approved by the theater faculty. Please consult the section “Courses cross-listed with other Wesleyan departments, colleges, and programs” in the Theater Handbook.
  • Two courses in dramatic literature, visual literacy, theory, criticism, and/or service learning. One of them may be an FYS course. Specialty courses in other departments may fulfill one of the two requirements only if approved by the theater faculty. Please consult the section “Courses cross-listed with other Wesleyan departments, colleges, and programs” in the Theater Handbook.
  • One credit of THEA329/THEA331 (earned in .25- and .5-credit increments).
  • One credit of THEA427/THEA431/THEA433/THEA435/THEA437.

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