CURRICULUM: PRECOLLEGE STUDY 2018

Please email precollege@wesleyan.edu if you have any questions.

Click here to download a printable PDF of the PreCollege Course Schedule.

Focus on Writing

Writing Course: Select One

  • ENGL259 The Art of the Personal Essay / Meg Weisberg

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

  • ENGL296: Techniques of Fiction / Lisa Locascio
    This introduction to the elements of fiction and a range of authors is for students who want to write and, through writing, increase their understanding and appreciation of a variety of short stories.
  • FILM458: Visual Storytelling: Screenwriting / Mirko Rucnov
    Since watching movies (good ones) is so easy and pleasurable, screenwriting is a medium that everyone's uncle thinks they can do. But anyone who has had to read an amateur screenplay knows different. This is a writing course that will start from ground zero: separating the screenplay from other forms, e.g., the play and the novel, and grounding students in visual language as the basis of the medium. How do we write in pictures?

Focus on Liberal Arts

Elective: Select One

  • ARST190: Digital Art / Christopher Chenier

    This experience will introduce students to the digital arts, an area of creative practice encompassing computer-based art from GIFS and graphics to cutting edge digital fabrication tools. While developing the critical and methodological tools to engage problems in our digital culture, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to create and communicate digitally. Sessions will emphasize the ways software is used for project development, prototyping, and experimentation. Most of our time will be spend in Adobe Creative Cloud. The core elements of CC will be covered through workshops in image editing, graphics, layout, and type. Translating digital files into physical objects, students will work with a laser cutter, large format inket printers, and a CNC mill.

  • ENGL259 The Art of the Personal Essay / Meg Weisberg

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

     

  • ENGL296: Techniques of Fiction / Lisa Locascio
    This introduction to the elements of fiction and a range of authors is for students who want to write and, through writing, increase their understanding and appreciation of a variety of short stories.
  • FILM458: Visual Storytelling: Screenwriting / Mirko Rucnov

    Since watching movies (good ones) is so easy and pleasurable, screenwriting is a medium that everyone's uncle thinks they can do. But anyone who has had to read an amateur screenplay knows different. This is a writing course that will start from ground zero: separating the screenplay from other forms, e.g., the play and the novel, and grounding students in visual language as the basis of the medium. How do we write in pictures?

  • GOVT155: International Politics / Guilio Gallarotti

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

  • PSYC291: Language and Thought / Anna Shusterman

    This course provides a close examination on the relationship between language and thought, a central question in cognitive science and a very active area of research and theory in recent years. Students will be exposed to theoretical and empirical work evaluating several prominent hypotheses about language and thought, including the hypothesis that the language you speak influences or even determines the thoughts you can think. The case studies to be evaluated will include object kinds, number, spatial relations, time, gender, theory of mind, and causality. This is an elective course towards the psychology major.

     

    Major Readings:

    Students will read primary source readings from empirical journals and selected review papers in books or journals. Readings will draw on empirical studies in psychology with a particular emphasis on cross-linguistic and cross-cultural studies. The theoretical foundation will draw from psychology as well as philosophy, linguistics, cognitive science, neuroscience, and anthropology. Authors to be read include Barner, Boroditsky, Carey, Carruthers, Clark, Fodor, Gleitman, Gordon, Jackendoff, Landau, Laurence, Locke, Margolis, Pinker, Slobin, Spelke, and Whorf.

     

    Examination and Assignments:

    6 one-page response papers; short quizzes; final essay; and discussion.

Focus on Leadership

Social Justice Leadership

Acclaimed for its proactive stance on issues of justice, diversity, and social progress, Wesleyan is an ideal place for students with interests in these areas to receive firsthand training. Professional staff from Wesleyan's Office of Residential Life have created a four-part social justice training program that will prepare you to manage interpersonal and social conflict. You will be better prepared for leadership roles, increasing your impact on your next college campus, and engaging with your community as a world citizen. Students who participate in all sessions will receive a certificate.