Events in Usdan

Oct 24

Fusion

10:15 pm

Oct 25

Joan Diamore

09:00 am

Oct 26

Trash American Style

09:00 am

Trash American Style - You want more music in your life. Then stop by to visit Malcolm - the coolest cat this side of the Mississippi. Check out his vinyl collection, and ask him about his last tour swing down South. The dude makes and sells music that is so far from ear candy.

Oct 29

Nan Vecchitto

09:00 am

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Ronald Kuivila, Professor of Music Wesleyan University Hearing Changes 100 years ago, Rainer Maria Rilke proposed bending a phonograph to the coronal suture of a skull to enact a reconnection of senses sundered by instruments of research. A decade or two later, Antonin Artaud conceived a reversal of soma and psyche in which the shaping of breath shapes affective state as acting. The keywords silence, noise, reduced listening, and soundscape mark related cognitive refashionings in music of the post-war period. 50 years ago, John Cage remarked that digital means induce a change from the influences of scarcity or economy to the influences of abundance and Id be willing to say waste. Our attitude is changing, our minds are changing, our experience is changing from the insistence upon making the best choice to the willingness to make many choices.One marker of current anxiety with this industrious and choosy profusion is the question Is Google Making Us Stupid? The analog to digital conversion offigures of cognitive changein auditory culture, alternately audible, inaudible, conceptual and somatic,will be the focus of this talk.

Oct 31

Evansons

08:00 pm

The mind reading duo has performed in over 35 countries across the globe and made numerous TV appearances on major networks like NBC, FOX, CBS, CW Network, Discovery Channel and Netflix. They've performed at the World Famous Magic Castle in Hollywood and at the Great American Comedy Festival in the Johnny Carson Theater. The Psychic Entertainers Association gave them its most prestigious award for distinguished professionalism. They were also the first recipients of "The Mentalism Award" from the Milbourne Christopher Foundation and the only mentalists ever to receive the "SARMOTI Award" which legendary magicians Siegfried and Roy present to their favorite act in Las Vegas. Check them out here: http://www.evason.com/video.php

Fusion

10:15 pm

Nov 5

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Embodied Engineering: Gender, Technology, and Body Politics in Mali (West Africa) Laura Ann Twagira Wesleyan University In the 1940s women in Mali were at the vanguard of a technological revolution. They began cooking in metal pots. Following decades of intensified colonial demands for wood, deforestation was a real concern. Women's adoption of metal pots addressed the ecological concern for wood fuel and saved labor time. Metal pots required less wood than clay pots and cooked faster. Women who cooked with a clay pot stirred slowly for hours. The metal ones required bigger and faster movements. Cooking was very much a technique of the body. Over the twentieth century the status of African women emerged as a policy concern, especially women's labor, first among colonial administrators and later among development experts, and postcolonial government officials. Women did not view their own physical labor as a problem. Women were rural engineers, and through their technological work they mediated the shifting natural and political environment of the twentieth century. Laura Ann Twagira, Assistant Professor of History Wesleyan University Embodied Engineering: Gender, Technology, and Body Politics in Mali (West Africa) In the 1940s women in Mali were at the vanguard of a technological revolution. They began cooking in metal pots. Following decades of intensified colonial demands for wood, deforestation was a real concern. Women's adoption of metal pots addressed the ecological concern for wood fuel and saved labor time. Metal pots required less wood than clay pots and cooked faster. Women who cooked with a clay pot stirred slowly for hours. The metal ones required bigger and faster movements. Cooking was very much a technique of the body. Over the twentieth century the "status of African women" emerged as a policy concern, especially women's labor, first among colonial administrators and later among development experts, and postcolonial government officials. Women did not view their own physical labor as a problem. Women were rural engineers, and through their technological work they mediated the shifting natural and political environment of the twentieth century.

Social Entrepreneurship at Wesleyan - student panel

07:00 pm

Students from the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship will talk about their projects and ventures. All are welcome.

Nov 7

Andris Lapins

09:00 am

Fusion

10:15 pm

Nov 12

Joan Diamore

09:00 am

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Megan Glick, Assistant Professor of American Studies Wesleyan University The Childrens Hatchery: On the Nonhuman Origins of Neonatology

Nov 13

Nov 14

Fusion

10:15 pm

Nov 19

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Christina Crosby, Wesleyan Written on the Body, The Temporalities of Grief

Nov 26

Nan Vecchitto

09:00 am

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Marisa Fuentes, Associate Professor of Women's & Gender Studies and History, Rutgers University Title:"Refuse Bodies and the Technologies of Waste Production in the Transatlantic Slave Trade." This talk considers theprecarious lives and lingering deaths of what European slave traders called refuse slavesAfrican captives who were refused at purchase or who survived the Middle Passage but died before they could be sold in Atlantic ports. This topic arose during Fuentes confrontation with an archive that mentioned or referredin the abstractto hundreds of thousands of people who died in the process of the slave trade, but who have been taken for granted in the historical and theoretical accounts of slavery, theories of precarity, and human liminality. The talk dwells on these people and bodies, and the ways in which the production of the raw material of slaves as laborers and property also rendered humans as wastethe collateral damage of the capitalist regime of early modern slavery. In this new project, Fuentes contemplatesthe conditions of refuse slaves in the archive and the consequences of this category of human to our understanding of capitalism, slavery, histories and theories of the human, and the origins of black disposability.

Nov 28

Fusion

10:15 pm

Nov 29

Dec 3

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Alison Kafer, Southwestern University After Crip, Beyond Disability

Dec 4

Patricelli Center Fellowship Demo Day

09:00 am

Students in CSPL264 (the Patricelli Center Fellowship) will pitch their social change and entrepreneurship work. All are welcome to attend. Read more about the Fellowship at http://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli/fellowship.html, and look for additional event details at https://www.facebook.com/wesleyan.engage/.

Dec 8

Wesleyan Christmas Celebration Dinner

05:30 pm

All are welcome to kick off the Christmas season with dinner, carols, and the reading of the Christmas story.

Wesleyan Christmas Celebration Dinner

05:30 pm

All are welcome to kick off the Christmas season with dinner, carols, and the reading of the Christmas story.

Dec 11

Mar 4

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Christopher Johnson, Arizona State Etcetera: On Hyperbolic Description Brief Description oftask: My talk explores some rhetorical, epistemological, material, and metaphysical aspects of hyperbolic description, or writing that tries to say "all" about a thing, feeling, action, phenomenon, or idea. Weighing examples by Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz, Giambattista Marino, Robert Burton, Denis Diderot, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, I ask: How do such hyperbolic descriptions work? What motivates these attempts? How should they be interpreted? And when does expression eclipse representation? To help answer these questions, I also glance at other media and engage recent theoretical voices (Eco, Latour, andFelski) urging descriptions of "networks" rather than definitions that insist on the correspondence between subjects and objects.

Mar 28

CAAS Distinguished Alumni Lecture

04:30 pm

CAAS Distinguished Alumni Lecture Saidiya Hartman, Professor of English and Comparative Literature Columbia University

Apr 1

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Tavia Nyong'o, Yale University

Apr 8

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Nicole Fleetwood, Rutgers

Social Entrepreneurship at Wesleyan - student panel

07:00 pm

Students from the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship will talk about their projects and ventures. All are welcome.

Apr 15

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Steven Wooglar, University of Oxford

Apr 29

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Sianne Ngai, University of Chicago

May 7

Patricelli Center Fellowship Showcase

09:00 am

Students in CSPL265 (the Patricelli Center Fellowship) will pitch their social change and entrepreneurship work. All are welcome to attend. Read more about the Fellowship at http://www.wesleyan.edu/patricelli/fellowship.html, and look for additional event details at https://www.facebook.com/wesleyan.engage/.