Wesleyan University Press has an editorial program that focuses on poetry, music, dance, science fiction studies, film-TV, and Connecticut history and culture. Publishing in its current form since 1957, the press has published an internationally renowned poetry series, collecting five Pulitzer Prizes, a Bollingen, and three National Book Awards in that one series alone. The mission of the press is to develop and maintain a sound and vigorous publishing program that serves the academic ends and intellectual life of the university and beyond. 

We are moving to Hopkins Fulfillment Services, for distribution, starting November 15, 2018. Our new ordering/sales number will be 800-537-5487. Read more about the change here. 

2018 National Book Award for Poetry Finalist!

 NBA Short Listed Wobble

Congratulations to Rae Armantrout!
Wobble is short-listed for
the 2018 National Book Award for Poetry. 

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Win an innovative poetic glossary!

Win an innovative poetic glossary!

Win a copy of Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene

Edited by Linda Russo and Marthe Reed
With preface by Allison Adelle Hedge Coke

Click here for your chance to win.

“Affirming the imagination’s importance in effecting change, with marvelous invention this poets’ glossary of terms responsive to the Anthropocene illuminates losses and violations, offers resources, inspires hope.” —Lynn Keller, author of Recomposing Ecopoetics

Featured Books

News & Highlights

Hilda Raz, Exploring Trans Identity in Poetry

Hilda Raz, Exploring Trans Identity in Poetry

Author of the first poetic exploration of transgender issues by the mother of a transgendered child Hilda Raz and her poetry serve as a reminder of humanity in today’s socio-political world on the edge of redefining gender and identity along political party lines. Trans (2001, Wesleyan) is considered the first poetic exploration of transgender issues…
Debut Collection Recalls Lasting Impact of Carlisle Indian School

Debut Collection Recalls Lasting Impact of Carlisle Indian School

In How to Dress a Fish, poet Abigail Chabitnoy, of Unangan and Sugpiaq descent, addresses the lives disrupted by US Indian boarding school policy. She pays particular attention to the life story of her great grandfather, Michael, who was taken from the Baptist Orphanage, Wood Island, Alaska, and sent to Carlisle Indian Industrial School in…
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