Lecture Series

Feb 14

"Wisdom in Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hamilton" - Karl Scheibe

04:30 pm

Lin-Manuel Miranda, the guiding force of Hamilton, studied at Wesleyan University and for a time with Karl Scheibe. Hamilton is a convincing example of the value of melding the perspective of theater with the concepts of psychology. The play is not only a lesson in history celebrating the genius of one of our founders. It is also an exhibition of what might be achieved by adroit leadership of a talented group of people where the ensemble performance is more than the sum of its parts. This is a musical for the ages producing an experience for its audiences that has multi-dimensional depth of character as well as of history. It is a work suffused with emotion and productive of joy. The talk will develop some of these themes and will include a few excerpts from the play.

Feb 28

"The Politics of Global Warming" - Gary Yohe

04:30 pm

Climate Change Science in a post Paris Accord world 15-20 minutes of basics and history and then extensive Q and A.

Mar 28

"Obstacles to Take up in Ecuador's Conditional Cash Transfer Program" - James McGuire

04:30 pm

Obstacles to Takeup: Ecuador's Conditional Cash Transfer Program, theBono de Desarrollo Humano Social assistance programs cannot help the poor if the poor do not enroll in them. Obstacles to the takeup of social assistance in industrialized countries include information costs, compliancecosts, and psychological costs. Using qualitative field research and quantitative analysis of data from a nationwide survey in 2013-14, we explore the impact of these costs the takeup of theBono de Desarrollo Humano (BDH), a US $50 monthly cash transfer in Ecuador. Controlling for program design and household poverty, we find that compliance costs and psychological costseach have a significant deterrent effect on BDH takeup. The purpose of social assistance is to help the poor, but if social assistance is to achieve this goal, the poor must actually receive it. Thisstudy helps to identify the forces and circumstances that influence the takeup of an important social assistance program in a middle-income Latin American country.

Apr 4

"Fresh Eyes: Teaching Literature in Prison" - Priscilla Meyer

04:30 pm

Through Wesleyans Center for Prison Education program, Priscilla Meyer (Program in Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies) has twice taught a course called Constructing Identity: The Real McCoy in the Cheshire maximum security prison for men. The talk will describe some of the exhilarating moments of class discussion, the difference between teaching there and on the Wesleyan campus, and plans for a new course, Russian Literature: Literal and Metaphoric Prisons in the 19th and 20th century, to be taught Fall 2018.

Apr 11

"Stem Cell Therapies: Where do we Stand" - Laura Grabel

04:30 pm

This talk will focus on the prospects for stem cell-based therapies and include descriptions of our work using human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons to treat epileptic mice, as well as progress made towards treating other diseases and injuries. We will also cover some of the the politics and ethics surrounding stem cell research.

Apr 25

Pierre Coran: Battle of the Belge" - Norman Shapiro

04:30 pm

Discussion and reading from Norman Shapiros latest translations, acollection of Belgian poetPierre Coran entitled Fables of Town andCountry. ("Fables des villes et des champs").

Film Series

Feb 6

Rome, Open City

03:00 pm

Wasch Center for Retired Faculty Film Series "Postwar Italian Masterpieces"

Mar 6

The Bicycle Thieves

03:00 pm

Wasch Center for Retired Faculty Film Series "Postwar Italian Masterpieces"

May 1

Divorce Italian Style

03:00 pm

Wasch Center for Retired Faculty Film Series "Postwar Italian Masterpieces"