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Monday, 3/25/19 6:00 Daniel Family Commons

Wesleyan University | Center for the Humanities

MONDAY NIGHT LECTURE SERIES | HYPERBOLE: SENSE, SENSATION, SPECTACLE

Plato on the Possibility of a Reality-Based Community

Plato on the Possibility of a Reality-Based Community

Tushar Irani • Wesleyan University

March 25 @ 6 P.M.
Daniel Family Commons, Usdan University Center

If false speech were impossible, then every claim about the world would be permitted. But how is it possible to speak about what is not? Famously, Plato solves this problem in the Sophist by defining the nature of not-being as the form of difference. This talk brings that problem and its solution into connection with some other startling metaphysical views argued for in the Sophist: that the forms are interwoven with each other as part of a “community” (koinonia), that it is due to this interweaving of forms that speech is possible, and that the forms must be said to experience change. In what sense can a set of abstract and timeless objects be said to experience change? Why is it important to Plato that they do so? And how does he think our practices of truth-telling and truth-seeking depend on this fact? This talk offers some provisional answers.

 Modernist Drag

Opening Reception and Gallery Talk: For Effect—Emphatic Bodies from the Renaissance to the Industrial Age

Thursday, April 4, 2019 at 5:00pm
Davison Art Center

For Effect

Opening Reception and Gallery Talk: For Effect—Emphatic Bodies from the Renaissance to the Industrial Age

Thursday, April 4, 2019 at 5:00pm
Davison Art Center

FREE! 

From eye rolls to statement jewelry—we exaggerate with our bodies as much as with our words, if not more so. Yet, more than 500 years after the Renaissance, conceptions of the "normal" body remain grounded in ideals of the human body as mathematically proportional, static, and unadorned. The exhibition For Effect: Emphatic Bodies from the Renaissance to the Industrial Age examines the obverse of these ideals, and presents bodies exaggerated by their accoutrements, pose, and anatomical proportion from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. Across artistic movements and historical contexts, artists exaggerated bodies to evoke from spectators responses as widely ranging as sympathy, shock, offense, or desire.

Exhibition on display from Friday, April 5 through Sunday, May 26, 2019.

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday from Noon to 4pm.

Image: Jacques Callot (French, 1592–1635). The Two Pantaloons (Les Deux Pantalons), 1616. Etching. Second of two states. DAC accession number 1971.18.1. Friends of the Davison Art Center, Theater Department, and purchase funds, 1971. Open Access Image from the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University (photo: M. Johnston).