Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior, mind, and brain. We seek to understand how people think and act, both as individuals and in groups.  The department has 18 faculty providing expertise in six subareas of study: cognitive, cultural, developmental, social, psychopathology, and neuroscience.  Features of the major include foundational courses, training in statistics and research methods, a cultural immersion experience, small advanced seminars, and opportunities to conduct original research.

DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS

DECLARING THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR, CLASS of 2020

Feb. 7 to March 9 sophomores requesting to declare the psychology major through Wes-Portal will receive this Registrar's email with important instructions.

PSI CHI APPLICATION

Due on Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018 by 4:00pm in Judd Hall Rm. 107 (mailroom, main office). FAQ HOUR to answer any questions in person about the organization and the application on Tues., Feb. 13th, 12:00-1:00 pm in the Judd Lounge Rm. 103.

COLLOQUIUM SERIES

March 8
12:15 pm, Judd Hall 116
“HOW DO SEXUAL MINORITIES RESPOND TO HETEROSEXIST SOCIAL SYSTEMS?”
Mark Hoffarth
New York University

Despite increasingly liberal attitudes toward homosexuality in U.S. society, heterosexist systems and practices that give advantages to heterosexuals over sexual minorities remain in place. What social psychological factors enable heterosexism to be maintained? I argue that there are two main factors at play. First, members of the dominant social group (i.e., heterosexuals) justify heterosexism and express heterosexist attitudes—often in “subtle” or socially acceptable ways. Second, system justification motivation may discourage sexual minorities from “coming out” publicly and engaging in political resistance against the heterosexist status quo. I will discuss how these two factors are related and how they contribute jointly to the perception of sexual minorities as deviating from the “norm” and therefore deserving of mistreatment.

Mark Hoffarth is a visiting postdoctoral scholar at New York University with Dr. John Jost. He is interested in political psychology, intergroup relations, and sexuality. He is currently completing an NSF-funded postdoc examining when and why sexual minorities either challenge or justify heterosexist social systems, including factors such as political ideology, religiosity, system-justifying stereotypes, sexual identity, and well-being.

DEPARTMENT PEER ADVISOR PROGRAM

The goal of the department peer advisor (DPA) program is to provide additional peer advising support to pre-major students and to answer questions about specific requirements for the psychology department. Click on the link above for more information.