Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Summer Session 2021 courses have been moved online.

Summer Session I registration ends at noon on May 25. Summer Session II registration ends at noon on June 24.

Summer Session 2021 Schedule

Registration opens Monday, April 5, 2021
Session I: Wednesday May 26 – Tuesday June 22, 2021 (exams June 23-24)
Session II: Monday June 28 – Friday July 23, 2021 (exams July 26-27)

All courses are 1.0 credit (except for CHEM152Z, which is .5 credit). Information subject to change. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Summer Session courses. Incompletes will not be granted for Summer Session courses. All courses are 1 Wesleyan credit. Summer enrollments are processed on a first-come, first-served basis (no seats saved for majors or class years). The request and any approvals must be fully complete before enrollments are processed.

Courses subject to change without notice.                     

Summer Session 2021 Course List

Summer Session Schedule Chart (PDF)

Arts and Humanities

  • ARST190Z/IDEA190Z: Digital Foundations / Christopher Chenier (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ART
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10:50am-12:55pm, Synchronous

    This introduction to the digital studio engages software and digital media as an expanded field of creative production in contemporary art and design. Through a sequence of workshops, exercises, and hands-on digital projects, students will build a technical and creative toolkit for developing, refining, and presenting original digital work. Open to all skill levels, this course prioritizes sustained and rigorous engagement with digital tools while emphasizing conceptual and thematic problems in digital art and culture.

  • CANCELLED - COL101Z: Truth and Lies in Crime Writing / Charles Barber (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    HA COL
    Grading Mode: 
    Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm, Synchronous

    This course will explore a range of crime fiction and nonfiction, from literary classics to genre-based texts. Readings will include Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment," Edgar Allan Poe, Raymond Chandler, and P.D. James, and nonfiction works such as "In Cold Blood," Robert Kolker's "Lost Girls," and Charles Barber's "Citizen Outlaw." A theme of the class will be the duplicitous and elusive nature of truth and objectivity in both the journalistic and fictional accounts. Students will have the opportunity to write a short piece of crime fiction or narrative nonfiction, in addition to analytical papers.

  • CANCELLED - DANC357Z/THEA357Z: Space and Materiality: Performing Place / Marcela Oteiza (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : HA DANC
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 3:30pm-5:35pm. A blend of synchronous class time meetings and asynchronous work.

    Scenography explores and shapes the material world in and through the performative event. In site-specific performances, scenography transforms place and time to create an alternative reality in which the materiality of the artistic design and the performer's body intervene in the architecture of a place and the spectator's reception of meaning. In this course, we will study site interventions through the lens of street performance, immersive theater, and the theatrical apparatus to build a theoretical and hands-on understanding of the material potential and limitations of the four key elements involved in the scenographic project--artistic design, the actor's body, local architecture, and time.

    This course is divided in four units: site-specific interventions; street performance; immersive theater; and theatrical apparatus. Each unit includes scholarly readings, assignments in performance and scenography, and a response paper. The final project for the course is a performance intervention devised for a particular site on campus that demonstrates the student's cumulative grasp of site specificity, scenography, and materiality.

  • CANCELLED - ENGL286Z/AFAM288Z: "Writing Should Do Something": The Essays of James Baldwin / Elizabeth Bobrick (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : HA ENGL
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 11:00am-12:40pm, Synchronous

    Baldwin's essays, both deeply personal and political, speak of a divided self in a divided country. As Black man, he saw himself as a problem for America; as a gay man, he was a problem for many; and as a self-described "maverick," he resisted any identification other than "writer." He wrote frankly of hating, and being hated, while insisting that without love and compassion, even for those who hated him, a decent life was unattainable. In this course, we will consider Baldwin as one of the greatest essayists of his century, a social critic who believed that "writing should do something," in the words of a letter he wrote to his brother.

    Baldwin began publishing to acclaim in the 1950s; he was a celebrated public figure in the fight for racial equality in the 1960s. By the mid-1970s, however, his complicated relationship both with white liberals and leaders of the Black Power movement diminished his political stature. With the Obama presidency and the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement, his work experienced a renaissance: almost 30 years after Baldwin's death, Ta-Nehisi Coates acknowledged "The Fire Next Time," published in 1962, as the inspiration for "Between the World and Me."

    This is not a theory course, either social or literary. While our supplementary material will place Baldwin's essays within their historical and social context, our focus will be on the narrative nonfiction techniques Baldwin used to such startling and timeless effect. We will read Baldwin's most famous essays, and some that are less well known. Our supplementary readings and viewings will explore his continuing influence, and the influence of Black music on Baldwin.

  • ENGL259Z/WRCT228Z: The Art of the Personal Essay / Lauren Silber (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 8:30am-10:35am. A blend of synchronous class time meetings and asynchronous work.

    We all have stories to tell. But there is hard work in the act of transforming our intimate experiences into meaningful and captivating stories. This course dives into this labor by focusing on the craft of essay writing. Quite specifically, students will practice a variety of creative nonfiction writing techniques as a means of critically reflecting and analyzing personal experiences in order to produce essays that speak to readers in and outside of our immediate communities and contexts. Course assignments will include a writer’s journal, workshop letters to classmates, three short personal essays, and a final essay whose subject and style is decided by the writer. Readings will include essays published in the past thirty years by authors such as (but not limited to) Kiese Laymon, Jesmyn Ward, Jose Antonio Vargas, Zadie Smith, and Karla Villavicencio.

  • ENGL292Z: Techniques of Non-Fiction / Brando Skyhorse (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : HA ENGL
    Grading Mode: CR/U
    Schedule: Asynchronous


    In this course, we will learn how to craft and revise short pieces of nonfiction writing that draw on our own life experiences and our observations of the world around us. To achieve this goal, we will constantly be creating and editing our own prose, and we will perform various writing exercises. Moreover, we will read our colleagues' nonfiction prose and offer them thoughtful, generous feedback. Finally, we will read various published nonfiction essays--memoirs, musings, reviews, and reportage--and we will analyze these pieces in order to understand how veteran authors narrate "real-life" stories in a way that is engaging, beautiful, and meaningful. Upon completing this course, you will have a deeper knowledge of how to construct resonant nonfiction narratives, and a better understanding of various literary concepts, including pacing, arc, imagery, place, and character. You will have learned how to harvest experiences and observations from your own life in order tell a story that reveals subtle but acute information about the larger world.

  • MUSC278Z: Survey of Jazz Styles / Noah Baerman (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    HA MUSC
    Grading Mode: 
    Student Option
    Schedule: 
    Monday and Thursday, 3:30pm-5:35pm. A blend of synchronous class time meetings and asynchronous work.

    In "Survey of Jazz Styles" we will be looking to understand how jazz works. We will be exploring historical developments and chronology, but it is not a history class. We will be delving into some structural issues, but it is not a music theory class - in fact, a background in music theory is not at all necessary for this course. In essence, we will be developing an awareness and tools that will allow us to understand and evaluate what we are hearing when we listen to live or recorded jazz. We will explore how and why the musicians do what they do, and the larger context into which a performance fits.

  • RL&L123Z/ENGL123Z/FGSS123Z/COL123Z/ MDST125Z/WLIT249Z: Love, Sex, and Marriage in Renaissance Europe / Michael Meere (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    HA RLAN
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 3:30pm-5:35pm, Synchronous

    This writing-intensive seminar will compare literary and artistic depictions of love, sex, and marriage during the Renaissance by authors and artists from England, Spain, France, Flanders, Germany, and Italy. We will read both male and female writers in genres ranging from poetry, the short story, and theater to the essay, the travel narrative, and the sermon. We will also examine other arts such as painting, sculpture, and the decorative arts (e.g., wedding chests). Questions we will explore include, but are not limited to, How were love and marriage related during the Renaissance? What role did sex, gender, and violence play in relationships between couples and within society? How do gender and genre affect the ways in which love, sex, and marriage are depicted? How did cultural differences influence writers' and artists' interpretations of love, sex, and marriage? And what about same-sex unions? Other topics will include virginity and celibacy, erotic literature, family and class structures, and divorce.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • CSPL318Z: Global Populism / Esam Boraey (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Monday-Thursday, 7:00pm-9:05pm, Synchronous

    In this course, we will unpack the factors pushing communities worldwide toward these political ideologies as well as the impact it has on global politics and international relations. We'll take a deep dive into the 2020 campaign cycle in the age of digital campaigning and online voting and analyze how Donald Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders are shaping our political discourse and how they fit into the global trend of populism. We'll study the defeat of democratic movements like the Arab Spring and the rise of authoritarian regimes in the region. Additionally, we'll break down how the failure of democratic movements in the MENA region led to the refugee crisis, which in turn inspired right-wing radicalization within Europe and the United States. This course provides an overview of the political landscape of the populism movements in the U.S. and around the world, focusing on the collapse of democratic movements and the rise of populist leaders like Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, Narendra Modi, Jair Bolsonaro, and Marine Le Pen, among others. We'll begin with a brief overview of the history of populism and the theory behind it, before breaking down modern applications.

  • CANCELLED - CSPL390Z: Connecticut's Industrial Heritage / Colin Caplan (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode: 
    Graded
    Schedule: Tuesday-Friday, 10:50am-12:55pm, Synchronous

    The aim of this course is to give students a better understanding of the historical industrial merits and legacy of Connecticut while considering the value and challenges of its physical and interpretive remains. While focusing on New Haven, students will be challenged to discover and synthesize Middletown's historically chief industries, industrialists, inventions, workforce, and remaining factory sites. Professor Caplan brings his experience as a Historical Architect, historian, genealogist, author, National Register consultant, and tour operator to provide students with a well-rounded understanding of how history, preservation, architecture, social science, and environmental justice come together in actual projects.

  • CSPL317Z: Social and Political Perspectives on Digital Media / Lauren Rosewarne (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode: 
    Student Option
    Schedule: 
    Fully-asynchronous with individually-scheduled meetings with students and student project groups.

    This course examines the intersection between social media, politics, and society, analyzing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram to understand their role in our lives, in our political discourse and in shaping our culture. We examine the positives of social media including social activism, the democratization of news, and heightened capacities for community, communication, and connectivity. We also delve into the darker side of these platforms, exploring the proliferation of face news, hate speech, terrorist networks, and gendered issues including trolling and cyber harassment. This is an interdisciplinary course and in it we will draw upon a broad range of social theories including science technology studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, and media studies to understand the complex role of digital media in contemporary society.

  • ECON127Z/CSPL127Z: Introduction to Financial Accounting / Martin Gosman (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : SBS ECON
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Prerequisites: ECON101 OR ECON110 OR permission of instructor
    Schedule: Asynchronous; Blend of asynchronous lecture transcripts and individual (synchronous) meetings with students.

    In this course, no prior accounting knowledge is required or assumed. Students learn how accountants define assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses and where those items appear in firms' balance sheets and income statements. The purposes and limitations of these two financial statements as well as the statement of cash flows are considered. Students gain an understanding of the accounting choices allowed to firms for reporting to stockholders and creditors and learn how the use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Later assignments focus on ratio analysis of actual firms' financial statements, including techniques to identify firms in financial trouble.

  • CANCELLED - EDST225Z: Education and Empire / Talya Zemach-Bersin (Session I)
    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : SBS EDST
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Tuesday-Friday, 10:50am-12:55pm, Synchronous

    Wherever the U.S. has sought to gain or maintain control, whether by way of enslavement, forced assimilation, colonialism within the continental U.S., or by way of military occupation and imperialist rule abroad, education has played an all too often overlooked supporting role. Yet wherever this is true, there are also people who have used education as a means of resistance, rebellion, revolution, and liberation. This course offers an introduction to the transnational history of education in relation to the development of U.S. empire both at home and abroad. By bringing together topics often approached separately -- immigration, education, race, colonialism, and the history of U.S. empire -- we will interrogate the ways that education has been mobilized to deploy power: controlling knowledge, categorizing and policing difference, administering unequal paths to citizenship/belonging, forcing assimilation, promoting socio-economic divides, and asserting discipline and control. Topics to be covered include American Indian education and self-determination, African American education in slavery and freedom, U.S. colonial education in the Philippines/Cuba/Puerto Rico, immigration and forced Americanization schooling, Latinx fights for educational access and autonomy, State Department experiments in educational diplomacy and child socialization, educational missions abroad, and national security and the war on terror. Throughout, we will draw links between the past and the present and ask what it might mean to "decolonize" education today.
  • EDST250Z/PSYC288Z: Zero to Infinity: The Psychology of Numbers / Dominic Gibson (Session I)
    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : SBS EDST
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 8:30am-10:35am. A blend of synchronous class time meetings and asynchronous work.

    Can monkeys do math? Are babies statistical experts? Will I ever be good at calculus? What are we born with and what do we learn? Before children are ever taught formal mathematics in a classroom, they are confronted with situations where they must use their intuitive understanding of numbers, geometry, and space to successfully navigate their environments. In this course we read and discuss both foundational and cutting-edge articles from neuroscience, cognitive science, education and psychology to understand how humans bridge this gap between the informal and formal mathematical worlds. In doing so, we will try to understand where numbers come from, a question that bridges several areas of psychology, including how humans build theories about the world and how language affects our thinking. We will also tackle questions such as: How do culture and varying social contexts affect numerical understanding? What do we know about gender differences in math achievement? How do stereotypes, prejudice, and math anxiety affect math performance?
  • GOVT 155Z: International Politics / Giulio Gallarotti (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept
    : SBS GOVT
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm, Synchronous but will record class for asynchronous learners in different time zones.

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

  • QAC/CIS251Z: Data Visualization / Valerie Nazzaro (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
    Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 10:50am-12:05pm. Blend: 10:50am-12:05pm synchronous class meetings, with additional asynchronous lectures and assignments.

    This course will introduce students to the principles and tools necessary to present quantitative information in a visual way. While tables and graphs are widely used in our daily lives, it takes skill to deconstruct what story is being told. It also takes a perceptive eye to know when information is being misrepresented with particular graphics. The main goals of the course are for students to learn how to present information efficiently and accurately so that we enhance our understanding of complex quantitative information and to become proficient with data visualization tools. Beginning with basic graphing tools, we will work our way up to constructing map visualizations and interactive graphs. This course will require a substantial amount of computation in R. No prior programming experience is necessary, but learning does require willingness and time.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - QAC201Z/GOVT201Z/NS&B280Z/PSYC280Z: Applied Data Analysis / Emmanuel Kaparakis (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode: 
    Graded
    Schedule: 
    Monday-Thursday, 7:00pm-9:05pm, Synchronous - flipped classroom project-based learning

    In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.

  • SOCS256Z/FGSS255Z: Sex Work and Sex Trafficking : Empowerment, Exploitation, and the Politics of Sex / Kerwin Kaye (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    SBS SOC
    Grading Mode: 
    Student Option
    Schedule: Tuesday-Friday, 1:10pm-3:15pm. This course will be taught synchronously, but students who are in time zones that would make participation difficult would have an asynchronous option.

    This course explores the history, politics, and social meaning of sex work. Focusing particularly but not exclusively upon prostitution, we will pay careful attention to the diverse range of social experiences that form sex work, as well as the way in which prostitution is used as a governing metaphor within sexual relations more generally. Some questions the course will consider: How has sex work changed over time, and what do these changes tell us about both the nature of sex work and about the broader society? In what ways is sex work similar to or different from other forms of service labor or other types of intimate relationship? How do questions of race, class, sexuality, and gender alter the meaning and experience of sex work? What sorts of desires and expectations do clients bring to interactions with sex workers, and in what ways have these shifted over time? Recent controversies concerning sex trafficking and underage prostitution will also be addressed, as will the effects of various regulatory schemes that have been developed around the world.

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • CHEM141Z: General Chemistry I / Anthony Davis (Session I)

    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm, Synchronous

    CHEM 141/CHEM141Z is the first half of an introductory course in general chemistry intended for science majors and for premedical studies. The topics covered will include measurement and dimensional analysis; atomic theory; chemical nomenclature; mass relationships and the mole concept; stoichiometry; aqueous reactions; gases; thermochemistry; the quantum mechanical model of the atom; periodic trends; bonding theory; and molecular geometry. The full-year course can be completed by continuing on to CHEM 142.

  • CHEM142Z: General Chemistry II / Carla Coste Sanchez (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Prerequisite: CHEM141 or CHEM141Z
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm, Synchronous

    CHEM142/CHEM142Z is the second half of Introductory Chemistry and is intended for science majors and for premedical studies. This course will introduce theory as well as applications that involve significant amount of calculation. A strong familiarity with algebra is required. The topics covered will include intermolecular forces, acids and bases, solutions, their properties and equilibria, thermodynamics, free energy, electrochemistry and radioactivity. CHEM152/CHEM152Z, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. The lab should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

  • CHEM152Z: Introductory Chemistry Laboratory / Anthony Davis (Session I into Session II)

    Session: Session I extending into Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Full Summer course: May 26-July 27 - Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00am-12:00pm, Synchronous

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. It is required for Chemistry or MB&B majors and satisfies the general chemistry laboratory requirements for pre-medical studies. Chem152/CHEM152Z is usually taken concurrently with CHEM141/141Z, CHEM142/142Z, CHEM143, or CHEM144.

  • CANCELLED - ENVS250Z: Pandemic and the Environment / Kate Miller (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM ENVS
    Grading Mode: 
    Graded
    Schedule: Monday and Wednesday, 8:30am-10:35am. Monday and Wednesday class time synchronous, with additional asynchronous content and interactions.
    Syllabus: Click here

    The Covid-19 pandemic is a global disturbance with important environmental causes, effects and interactions. We will explore four key topics, evaluating what occurred and implications for future policy and practice. Wildlife: SARS-CoV-2 is a zoonotic disease, facilitated by "bush meat" markets and development of habitat that bring wildlife in close proximity to each other and humans. Stay-at-home orders, and temporary abandonment of human spaces released wildlife from constraints, while exposing the nature of our interdependence. Air pollution: Rates of hospitalization and mortality are greatest for those living with chronically high levels of air pollution, particularly PM <2.5. Factory and energy plant shutdowns sharply reduced those levels, highlighting the extent to which serious air pollution, and the disease and mortality it causes, has become acceptable. Environmental policy: As the crisis of the pandemic took center stage, numerous world leaders were emboldened to weaken, underfund, or attempt to eliminate environmental protections requiring corporate responsibility. Human environmental behavior: The public's behavior was altered by government recommendations and orders, as well as concern and fear, and continues to evolve with regard to use and value of open space and perceptions of high-density situations such as mass transit.

    We will examine these themes through readings critically, applying our understanding of scientific process and considering peer-review, source of data, context, voice and audience.

  • MB&B/BIOL181Z: Principles of Biology I: Cell Biology and Molecular Basis of Heredity / Sarah Kopac (Session I)
    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM BIOL
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm, Synchronous

    This course presents an exploration of the contemporary view of the cell and an introduction to the molecules and mechanisms of genetics and gene function. The course will have two major themes. First, we will focus on the central dogma of molecular biology, describing the process of information transfer from genetic code in DNA through protein synthesis and function. Topics include DNA replication and repair, chromosome dynamics, RNA transcription, protein translation, gene regulation, and genomics. Second, we will focus on cell theory and the underlying molecular mechanisms of cellular activity, including cell signaling, energetics, cell motility, and cell cycling. Lectures will stress the experimental basis of conclusions presented and highlight important details and major themes. The course will also emphasize problem solving approaches in cell and molecular biology.
  • MB&B/BIOL182Z: Principles of Biology II / Sarah Kopac (Session II)

    Session: Session II
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM BIOL
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Prerequisite: BIOL 181Z/MB&B181Z
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm, Synchronous

    This course covers biological principles at tissue, organ, organismic, and population levels of organization. We will review how animals regulate their internal environment to control or adapt to changes in temperature, salt levels, nutrients, levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and the presence of infectious agents. We will examine the molecular, cellular, and tissue mechanisms that underlie the hormonal, neuronal, and behavioral processes that underlie these responses. We will learn how these systems develop in the embryo. At the population level, we will review evidence for evolution, including the tenets of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. We will also discuss the nature and importance of variation among organisms, stochastic processes in evolution, and modern theories of speciation and macroevolution. Finally, the course addresses ecological aspects of population biology, including patterns and processes that inform the distribution and abundance of biodiversity, population growth, organisms' responses to environmental variation, and interactions among species. Each of the topics of the course is explored from a comparative viewpoint to recognize common principles as well as variations among organisms that indicate evolutionary adaptation to different environments and niches.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - PSYC295Z: The Science of Happiness / Jennifer D'Andrea (Session I)
    Session: Session I
    Gen Ed Area Dept:
    NSM PSYC
    Grading Mode: Student Option
    Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 3:30pm-5:35pm. A blend of synchronous class meetings and asynchronous work involving small group discussions.

    Positive Psychology is the study of human happiness.  The field has compiled an enormous research base offering evidence of the fundamental components of well-being and flourishing.  While early work utilized a narrow, Western definition of happiness, the discipline later broadened its focus to include traditionally Eastern concepts such as social harmony and compassion.  More recently, the field has been redefined through second wave and third wave positive psychologies, both of which seek to break free from the binary concepts of “positive” and “negative” in favor of a dialectic approach while utilizing concepts of flourishing through suffering found in indigenous psychology, as well as including models for systemic change found in social work, sociology, and economics. 

    This course will trace the history and development of Positive Psychology from its inception to the current state of the field, utilizing a Positive Psychology text supplemented by journal articles.  Core concepts will be discussed and critiqued.  Students will be required to keep “happiness journals” and complete out-of-class activities for the purpose of personal reflection upon and practice of individual experiences of happiness.  Additional course requirements include shorter and longer reflection papers, in-class discussion, and a final project.