Summer Session 2020 Courses 

Courses subject to change without notice.

Courses will also appear in WesMaps. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Summer Session courses. Incompletes will not be granted for Summer Session courses. All courses are 1 Wesleyan credit, with the exception of Chemistry 152Z (Lab) which is worth .5 credit.

Summer enrollments are processed on a first-come, first-served basis. The request, payment and any approvals must be fully complete before enrollments are processed.  No seats are saved for students majoring in the course's concentration. For example, no seats will be saved for students majoring in COMP in COMP 112Z.

 SUMMER SESSION I: MAY 27 - JUNE 25, 2020

  • AMST/AFAM 291Z: Afro-Asian Intersections / Amy Tang

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS AMST
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule
    : Monday-Friday, 3:30pm-5:10pm

    This course explores a range of historical, cultural, and political intersections between African and Asian diasporic people in the Americas from the late 19th century to the present. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, we will examine key moments in the history of Afro-Asian encounters in the Americas, including the importation of slave and coolie labor in the 19th century, the formation of anticolonial and antiracist "Third World" movements in the United States and abroad, and the 1992 Los Angeles uprising. We will also study forms of cultural interracialism, from African Americans' mania for kung fu in the 1970s, to interracial buddy films like Rush Hour (1998), to the contemporary fiction of writers such as Patricia Powell and Charles Johnson.

    Key readings will include:
    Nancy Abelmann and John Lie, BLUE DREAMS: KOREAN AMERICANS AND THE LOS ANGELES RIOTS; Moon-Ho Jung, COOLIES AND CANE: RACE, LABOR, AND SUGAR IN THE AGE OF EMANCIPATION; Leslie Bow, PARTLY COLORED: ASIAN AMERICANS AND RACIAL ANOMALY IN THE SEGREGATED SOUTH; Vijay Prashad, THE KARMA OF BROWN FOLK and EVERYBODY WAS KUNG FU FIGHTING; Eric Tang, UNSETTLED: COMBODIAN REFUGEES IN THE NEW YORK HYPERGHETTO; fiction by Charles Johnson, Hisaye Yamamoto, Patricia Powell; and additional readings by Bill Brown, Susan Koshy, Helen Jun, Colleen Lye, Gary Okihiro, and others.

  • CHEM 130Z: Discovering a Small World: Nanobots, Nanomedicine, and Nanomaterials / Anisha Gupta

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Monday-Friday, 9:00am-10:40am

    How can nano-sized salt and sugar help make food healthier? How can your ipod or Laptop get any smaller? Why does sunscreen contain titanium oxide nanoparticles? How small is "nano"? Through discussions on science fiction novels and learning of scientific principles, this course will explore how nano-sized objects are studies and used to advance the fields of medicine, electronics and biomaterials. The course offers the opportunity to explore the lab where we will perform experiments to measure the color changes of solutions that contain nanoparticles. This general education course is designed for non-science undergraduate majors where students will explore what we may not know about our world, our community, our friends and ourselves. This course is meant to teach students how to critically interpret science in popular media and news sources.

  • ENGL 259Z/WRCT 228Z: The Art of the Personal Essay / Meg Weisberg

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Section: 01
    ScheduleMonday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 8:40am - 10:45am

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

  • QAC/CIS 251Z: Data Visualization / Valerie Nazzaro

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 10:00am-11:40am

    This course will introduce students to the principles and tools necessary to present quantitative information in a visual way. While tables and graphs are widely used in our daily lives, it takes skill to deconstruct what story is being told. It also takes a perceptive eye to know when information is being misrepresented with particular graphics. The main goals of the course are for students to learn how to present information efficiently and accurately so that we enhance our understanding of complex quantitative information and to become proficient with data visualization tools. Beginning with basic graphing tools, we will work our way up to constructing map visualizations and interactive graphs. This course will require a substantial amount of computation in R. No prior programming experience is necessary, but learning does require willingness and time.

  • HIST 395Z/REES 344Z/RELI 393Z: "If there is no God, then is everything permitted?" Moral Life in a Secular World / Victoria Smolkin

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS HIST
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Mondays through Friday, 3:30pm - 5:10pm

    In Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, Dmitri Karamazov famously poses the question of what would happen to mankind "without God and immortal life," asking whether this means that "all things are permitted." Made famous by Dostoevsky, the question of whether we can be moral without God has always haunted secularism and has consistently been the most vocal criticism of unbelief. From papal condemnations of secularism and "godless Soviets," to the contemporary consensus that belief in God is evidence of moral goodness and its absence a sign of a broken ethical barometer, the assumption has been hat transcendental authority is all that stands between us and moral abyss. When the atrocities committed by "totalitarian" regimes are cited as this, it is only the most radical articulation of a broader narrative of secular modernity.

    One of modernity's master narratives is that people go from being under the care of the church to being under the care of the state, and our focus will be on historical cases where the question of secular values was explicitly engaged by the state. We will examine individual and collective articulations of morality in three prominent models of secularism: American civil religion, French laïcité, and Communist official atheism. What constitutes the moral foundation of a world without God? Can religion's moral and spiritual function be performed by a different kind of belief system?

    Major Readings: Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore

    1. Jonathan P. Herzog, THE SPIRITUAL-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX: AMERICA'S RELIGIOUS BATTLE AGAINST COMMUNISM IN THE EARLY COLD WAR (Oxford, 2011).
    2. Mark Lilla, THE STILLBORN GOD: RELIGION, POLITICS, AND THE MODERN WEST (Vintage, 2008).
    3. Hugh McLeod, THE RELIGIOUS CRISIS OF THE 1960s (Oxford, 2007, 2010).
    4. Samuel Moyn, THE LAST UTOPIA: HUMAN RIGHTS IN HISTORY (Belknap, 2012).

     

  • IDEA/PHYS/CIS 170Z: Introduction to Design and Engineering / Daniel Moller

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CIS
    Grading Mode: Credit/Unsatisfactory 
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 1:00pm-3:30pm

    This course will provide a hands-on introduction to design and engineering. Students will engage in individual and team projects in a studio environment where we seek to develop a shared practice and understanding of the engineering design process. We will study biological organisms to find inspiration for design hoppers, swimmers, and climbers. Students will build skills using computer-aided design (CAD) software and using tools for fabrication and prototyping including laser cutting and 3D printing. We will also hone skills in identifying which scientific and engineering principles need to be understood to achieve design goals.

  • COMP 112Z: Introduction to Programming / James Lipton

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MATH
    Grading Mode: Student option
    Schedule: 
    Monday through Thursday, 1:00pm - 3:05pm

    The course will provide an introduction to a modern, high-level programming language including a discussion of input/output, basic control structures, types, functions, and classes. The lectures will also discuss a variety of algorithms as well as program design issues.

  • CHEM 141Z: Introductory Chemistry I / Anthony Davis

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm

    This course emphasizes rigorous descriptive reasoning. While intended for students with little or no previous background in chemistry, the course is taught at a relatively high level. The topical coverage emphasizes the relationships between electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and the physical properties of the elements and their compounds.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

  • CHEM 152Z: Introductory Chemistry Lab / Anthony Davis

    (Note: .5-credits; 6-week course)

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleTuesdays and Thursdays, 9:00am-11:40am. This will continue into Session II for 2 class meetings (July 7 and July 14), 1:20pm-4:00pm.

    This course provides an introduction to the application of chemical concepts in the laboratory. The course will focus on practical aspects of fractional distillation, qualitative inorganic analysis, and synthesis of inorganic compounds. It should be taken by those who plan to take more than one year of chemistry.

    This course takes place over both Summer Sessions and is worth .5 credits total. 

  • GOVT 350Z: Law, Justice, and Democracy / Basak Kus

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 11:00am - 1:05pm

    This course offers a political-sociological perspective on law. In the first part of the course, we will address the question of "what is law?" by exploring a variety of theoretical approaches (Marxian, Weberian, and Durkheimian perspectives, legal formalism, legal realism, and critical legal studies). We will then move on to discussing the relationship between law and justice. In the third part of the course we will talk about politics of crime and punishment, exploring a number of key issues including the birth of modern prison, rising incarceration rates in the US, the emergence of drug courts, and the politics of the death penalty. In the fourth section, we will discuss the role courts play in constructing political and social reality. Specifically, we will look at two phenomena; speech, and religious liberty. In the final section of the course, we will discuss law's place in the American system of government by exploring the evolving relationship between courts, presidency, and Congress.

  • CSPL 399Z: Understanding the 2020 Presidential Election / John Stoehr

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Mondays through Friday, 3:30pm - 5:10pm

    In understanding the 2020 Presidential Election, students will learn how to read skeptically the political press and how to write critically about presidential campaign politics. Along the way, the course will touch on electoral history, political and social thought, public policy, media criticism, and much more. Students will read past examples of though-provoking and influential commentary. They will read current coverage in the legacy press of the 2020 presidential election and come to class prepared to discuss the most important stories and issues of the day. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the electoral politics and political writing alongside a veteran journalist. Students who have experience working for political campaigns will have a chance to share their knowledge and help the class incorporate their experience in a larger historical framework. They will have a chance to see their work published in the Editorial Board, the lecturer's daily politics newsletter. Students will attempt to do what political writers do in real-time: explain what's happening from a unique, particular, and informed point of view for the benefit of like-minded citizens seeking to achieve the ideal of self-government. In the end, the hope is that students see that campaign politics is simpler and more complex than it appears, but that neither is obvious without study, focus, and understanding.

SUMMER SESSION II: JUNE 29 - JULY 28, 2020

  • QAC 201Z/GOVT 201Z/NS&B 280Z/PSYC 280Z: Applied Data Analysis / Manolis Kaparakis

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Monday through Friday, 11:00am-12:40pm

    In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.

  • ENGL 259Z/WRCT 228Z: The Art of the Personal Essay / Lauren Silber

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Section:
    02
    ScheduleMonday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 8:40am - 10:45am

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

  • ARST 190Z/IDEA 190Z: Digital Art /¬†Christopher Chenier

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ART
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 3:30pm-5:10pm

    This experience will introduce students to the digital arts, an area of creative practice encompassing computer-based art from GIFS and graphics to cutting edge digital fabrication tools. While developing the critical and methodological tools to engage problems in our digital culture, students will acquire the practical skills necessary to create and communicate digitally. Sessions will emphasize the ways software is used for project development, prototyping, and experimentation. Most of our time will be spent in Adobe Creative Cloud. The core elements of CC will be covered through workshops in image editing, graphics, layout, and type. Translating digital files into physical objects, students will work with a laser cutter, large format inkjet printers, and a CNC mill.

  • GOVT 155Z: International Politics / Giulio Gallarotti

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

  • CHEM 142Z: Introductory Chemistry II / Andrea Roberts

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Prerequisites: CHEM141
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 9:00am-10:40am

    This course is a continuation of CHEM141. This course emphasizes rigorous descriptive reasoning. While intended for students with little or no previous background in chemistry, the course is taught at a relatively high level. The topical coverage emphasizes the relationships between electronic structure, chemical reactivity, and the physical properties of the elements and their compounds.

    CHEM152, the associated laboratory course, may be taken concurrently. CHEM152 will span over Summer Session I and II. 

    Please note: prerequisite required for CHEM142. PreCollege students may enroll with special permission only. For more information, please send email to precollege@wesleyan.edu

  • CSPL/GOVT 357Z: Saving the Republic: Lessons from Plato for our Time / Sarah Ryan

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode:
    Student Option
    Schedule: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 1:00pm-3:05pm

    In this service-learning course, students will use artistic performance to launch discussions of election 2020 issues in class and throughout the Middletown community. Our jumping off point is Plato's Republic. More than two thousand years ago, Plato addressed the pressing issues of the day: the rise of the oligarchy, dwindling of public deliberation, increasing political factionalism, and erosion of credible information. Some argue that the lessons of his Socratic exchanges, captured in Republic, are valuable to this day. In this course, students will immerse themselves in 403 B.C.E., a crucial moment in Athenian democracy. Following a close reading of Republic, the classroom will become the Athenian state. Each member of the class will assume a particular place in Athenian society and in the factions of the day using highly-developed roles from the Reacting to the Past curriculum. As members of the gathered assembly, students will debate divisive issues such as citizenship, elections, re-militarization, and the political process. Then, students will develop, rehearse, and publicly perform a one-act play at the Russell Library in Middletown. The play will be set in ancient Athens and will demonstrate factionalism, information asymmetry, political brokering, and other political issues of that era. Following the performance, the students will engage the audience in a Q&A about the relevance of the play's themes for the 2020 election. Students will be assessed in six ways: 1. Content quizzes on The Republic, 2. Written preparation for debates/assemblies, 3. Oral presentations in debates/assemblies, 4. Contribution to the classic public performance, 5. A short paper analyzing The Republic's relevance for the United States, particularly the 2020 election, and 6. Short reflection writings on our partnership with the Russell Library. No pervious experience in theater is necessary. Students will be encouraged to use their own skills in music, art, and drama as they devise ways to use the arts as catalysts for individual and social transformation.

  • CSPL 317Z: Social and Political Perspectives on Digital Media / Lauren Rosewarne

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     TBA
    Location: This course will be fully-online. More details will be available by the end of May.

    This course examines the intersection between social media, politics, and society, analyzing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram to understand their role in our lives, in our political discourse and in shaping our culture. We examine the positives of social media including social activism, the democratization of news, and heightened capacities for community, communication, and connectivity. We also delve into the darker side of these platforms, exploring the proliferation of face news, hate speech, terrorist networks, and gendered issues including trolling and cyber harassment. This is an interdisciplinary course and in it we will draw upon a broad range of social theories including science technology studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, and media studies to understand the complex role of digital media in contemporary society.

  • MUSC 278Z: Survey of Jazz Styles / Noah Baerman

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA MUSC
    Grading Mode:
    Student Option
    Schedule:
     Monday through Friday 3:30pm - 5:10pm

    In "Survey of Jazz Styles" we will be looking to understand how jazz works. We will be exploring historical developments and chronology, but it is not a history class. We will be delving into some structural issues, but it is not a music theory class - in fact, a background in music theory is not at all necessary for this course. In essence, we will be developing an awareness and tools that will allow us to understand and evaluate what we are hearing when we listen to live or recorded jazz. We will explore how and why the musicians do what they do, and the larger context into which a performance fits.

  • ENGL 296Z: Techniques of Fiction / Brando Skyhorse

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 8:40am - 10:45am

    Every great writer starts out as a great reader. In order to become a great reader, you must learn the proper questions to ask when evaluating a piece of writing. Using a wide sampling of short stories and basic fiction theory, this class will teach you how to get inside a writer's mind by dissecting what we have on the page. Students will participate in daily free writes, learn how to spot the tools and tricks of great writers, and how to apply those to their own writing. We'll also discuss story structure, how to "show" instead of "tell" by writing scenes, and how to edit and revise your work once you've finished a draft of it.