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Summer Session 2020 Courses 

CR/U option is available for all Summer Session courses. However, not all majors, minors, or certificates will accept all courses graded CR. Please consult with your advisor and department chair or director before selecting the CR/U option. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Summer Session courses. Incompletes will not be granted for Summer Session courses. All courses are 1 Wesleyan credit.

Summer enrollments are processed on a first-come, first-served basis (no seats saved for majors or class years). The request and any approvals must be fully complete before enrollments are processed.

Courses subject to change without notice.

SUMMER SESSION I: MAY 27 - JUNE 25, 2020

Courses with low enrollments will be cancelled on May 11, 2020 so we recommend that you register now if you are interested in a specific course in either session. However, registrations will be accepted up to the first day of class in either session, on a space-available basis.

  • BIOL/MB&B 181: Principles of Biology I: Cell Biology and Molecular Basis of Heredity / Sarah Kopac

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MB&B
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm

    This course presents an exploration of the contemporary view of the cell and an introduction to the molecules and mechanisms of genetics and gene function. The course will have two major themes. First, we will focus on the central dogma of molecular biology, describing the process of information transfer from genetic code in DNA through protein synthesis and function. Topics include DNA replication and repair, chromosome dynamics, RNA transcription, protein translation, gene regulation, and genomics. Second, we will focus on cell theory and the underlying molecular mechanisms of cellular activity, including cell signaling, energetics, cell motility, and cell cycling. Lectures will stress the experimental basis of conclusions presented and highlight important details and major themes. The course will also emphasize problem solving approaches in cell and molecular biology.

  • CHEM 130Z/MB&B 130Z: Discovering a Small World: Nanobots, Nanomedicine, and Nanomaterials / Anisha Gupta

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM CHEM
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Asynchronous, with synchronous meeting options based on student availability

    How can nano-sized salt and sugar help make food healthier? How can your ipod or Laptop get any smaller? Why does sunscreen contain titanium oxide nanoparticles? How small is "nano"? Through discussions on science fiction novels and learning of scientific principles, this course will explore how nano-sized objects are studied and used to advance the fields of medicine, electronics and biomaterials. This general education course is designed for non-science undergraduate majors where students will explore what we may not know about our world, our community, our friends and ourselves. This course is meant to teach students how to critically interpret science in popular media and news sources.

    The course evaluation will be composed of homework/participation, presentation/project, exams, quizzes and discussion board assignments. The course is very interactive with a mix of lectures and discussions. Some of the assignments will be based on listening to news related to nanotechnology, watching TED talks, answering questions after watching a Disney animated superhero film and participating in projects related to readings from Michael Crichton’s famous science fiction novel, PREY.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - ENGL 259Z/WRCT 228Z: The Art of the Personal Essay / Meg Weisberg

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Section: 01
    Schedule: Asynchronous, supplemented by one weekly group meeting (scheduled in consultation with the class), and one weekly individual conference with the instructor

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - QAC/CIS 251Z: Data Visualization / Valerie Nazzaro

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode: Graded
    Schedule10:00am-11:00am synchronous class meeting, Monday-Friday, with additional asynchronous lectures and assignments.

    This course will introduce students to the principles and tools necessary to present quantitative information in a visual way. While tables and graphs are widely used in our daily lives, it takes skill to deconstruct what story is being told. It also takes a perceptive eye to know when information is being misrepresented with particular graphics. The main goals of the course are for students to learn how to present information efficiently and accurately so that we enhance our understanding of complex quantitative information and to become proficient with data visualization tools. Beginning with basic graphing tools, we will work our way up to constructing map visualizations and interactive graphs. This course will require a substantial amount of computation in R. No prior programming experience is necessary, but learning does require willingness and time.

  • HIST 353Z/REES 353Z: The Communist Experience in the 20th Century / Victoria Smolkin

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS HIST
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Monday and Thursday, 3:30pm - 5:10pm, synchronous; remaining class time asynchronous

    Two decades have passed since the collapse of Communism, its empire, and its utopian vision of the kingdom of heaven on Earth. Indeed, the Communist collapse was heralded as not just the end of the Cold War but the end of history itself. Yet how do we understand the nature of the communist way of life, the causes of its decline, and the meaning of its demise? This course will trace the development of Communism's answer to capitalist modernity from the 1917 Revolution through the Soviet collapse. It will seek to shed light on the birth, life, and death of Communist modernity through history, literature, and art, by exploring the world socialism created as an ideological model and a way of life. The emphasis of the course will be on the lived experience of Communism, primarily within the Soviet Union, but also beyond it (in Eastern Europe and Asia). In the global conflict between capitalism and Communism, how did people understand the competing demands of ideology and reality, individual and society, private and public, production and consumption, labor and leisure? How did the state manage the contradictions that arose when lofty ideologies encountered everyday life, and how did citizens make sense of these ideological transformations? What killed Communism: bombs and diplomacy, or refrigerators and Finnish shoes?

    Required Readings: Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore

     

    • Paulina Bren, The Greengrocer and His TV: The Culture of Communism after the 1968 Prague Spring. Cornell University Press, 2010.
    • Boris Groys, The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-Garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond. Verso, 2011.
    • Heda Margolius Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague 1941-1968. Francis Epstein, trans. Holmes & Meier Publishers, 1997.
    • Glennys Young, ed. The Communist Experience in the Twentieth Century: A Global History through Sources. Oxford University Press, 2011.
    • Ji Xianlin, The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Chenxin Jiang, trans. NYRB, 2016. 

     

     

  • FULLY ENROLLED - COMP 112Z: Introduction to Programming / James Lipton

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MATH
    Grading Mode: Student option
    Schedule: 
    Monday through Thursday, 1:00pm - 3:05pm / asynchronous option

    Course will be recorded, and may be taken fully asynchronously or synchronously. Individual office hours as needed.

    The course will provide an introduction to a modern, high-level programming language including a discussion of input/output, basic control structures, types, functions, and classes. The lectures will also discuss a variety of algorithms as well as program design issues.

  • CSPL 399Z: Understanding the 2020 Presidential Election / John Stoehr

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Tuesday and Friday, 3:30pm - 5:10pm synchronous; remaining class time asynchronous

    In understanding the 2020 Presidential Election, students will learn how to read skeptically the political press and how to write critically about presidential campaign politics. Along the way, the course will touch on electoral history, political and social thought, public policy, media criticism, and much more. Students will read past examples of though-provoking and influential commentary. They will read current coverage in the legacy press of the 2020 presidential election and come to class prepared to discuss the most important stories and issues of the day. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the electoral politics and political writing alongside a veteran journalist. Students who have experience working for political campaigns will have a chance to share their knowledge and help the class incorporate their experience in a larger historical framework. They will have a chance to see their work published in the Editorial Board, the lecturer's daily politics newsletter. Students will attempt to do what political writers do in real-time: explain what's happening from a unique, particular, and informed point of view for the benefit of like-minded citizens seeking to achieve the ideal of self-government. In the end, the hope is that students see that campaign politics is simpler and more complex than it appears, but that neither is obvious without study, focus, and understanding.

SUMMER SESSION II: JUNE 29 - JULY 28, 2020

Courses with low enrollments will be cancelled on May 11, 2020 so we recommend that you register now if you are interested in a specific course in either session. However, registrations will be accepted up to the first day of class in either session, on a space-available basis.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - QAC 201Z/GOVT 201Z/NS&B 280Z/PSYC 280Z: Applied Data Analysis / Manolis Kaparakis

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Monday through Friday, 11:00am-12:40pm

    In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.

  • BIOL/MB&B 182: Principles of Biology II / Sarah Kopac

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM BIOL
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm

    This course covers biological principles at tissue, organ, organismic, and population levels of organization. We will review how animals regulate their internal environment to control or adapt to changes in temperature, salt levels, nutrients, levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and the presence of infectious agents. We will examine the molecular, cellular, and tissue mechanisms that underlie the hormonal, neuronal, and behavioral processes that underlie these responses. We will learn how these systems develop in the embryo. At the population level, we will review evidence for evolution, including the tenets of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. We will also discuss the nature and importance of variation among organisms, stochastic processes in evolution, and modern theories of speciation and macroevolution. Finally, the course addresses ecological aspects of population biology, including patterns and processes that inform the distribution and abundance of biodiversity, population growth, organisms' responses to environmental variation, and interactions among species. Each of the topics of the course is explored from a comparative viewpoint to recognize common principles as well as variations among organisms that indicate evolutionary adaptation to different environments and niches.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - ENGL 259Z/WRCT 228Z: The Art of the Personal Essay / Lauren Silber

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Section:
    02
    Schedule: Fully-asynchronous

    Fully Asynchronous - Individual meetings/office hours as needed

    The personal essay is short-form, first-person, narrative nonfiction that encompasses many genres: memoir, reflection, humor, familial and social history, and cultural criticism. Yet even these boundaries often blur within a single essay, and the personal essay can expand to include almost any topic. Writing personal essays--what author and critic Philip Lopate calls "the self-interrogative genre"--helps us find out what we think, often makes us change our minds, and, ideally, leads us to new insights. In class, we will discuss the assigned readings, participate in group responses to each others' writing (workshops), and write in response to prompts. We will study both traditional and unconventional techniques of nonfiction, focusing on the elements of craft: structure, voice, clarity, the use of descriptive detail, and revision.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - ARST 190Z/IDEA 190Z: Digital Art /¬†Christopher Chenier

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ART
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 3:30pm-5:10pm / asynchronous option
    Syllabus: Click here

    Course will be recorded, and may be taken fully asynchronously or synchronously. Individual office hours as needed.

    This introduction to the digital studio engages software and digital media as an expanded field of creative production in contemporary art and design. Through a sequence of workshops, exercises, and hands-on digital projects, students will build a technical and creative toolkit for developing, refining, and presenting original digital work. Open to all skill levels, this course prioritizes sustained and rigorous engagement with digital tools while emphasizing conceptual and thematic problems in digital art and culture.

    Workshops in image manipulation, compositing, motion graphics, and visual design will be led online by the instructor. These will be complemented with live “open studio” work sessions, slide lectures, screenings, and reviews. Students will be given asynchronous online access to all course materials, including Adobe Creative Cloud licenses. A course assistant will offer peer mentoring and technical support remotely several evenings a week.

  • GOVT 155Z: International Politics / Giulio Gallarotti

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Grading Mode: Graded
    ScheduleMonday through Friday, 1:30pm-3:10pm  / asynchronous option

    Course will be recorded, and may be taken fully asynchronously or synchronously. Individual office hours as needed.


    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - 317Z: Social and Political Perspectives on Digital Media / Lauren Rosewarne

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ALLB
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule:
     Fully-asynchronous
    Syllabus: Click here

    Fully Asynchronous - Individual meetings/office hours as needed

    This course examines the intersection between social media, politics, and society, analyzing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram to understand their role in our lives, in our political discourse and in shaping our culture. We examine the positives of social media including social activism, the democratization of news, and heightened capacities for community, communication, and connectivity. We also delve into the darker side of these platforms, exploring the proliferation of face news, hate speech, terrorist networks, and gendered issues including trolling and cyber harassment. This is an interdisciplinary course and in it we will draw upon a broad range of social theories including science technology studies, communication theory, linguistics, cultural studies, and media studies to understand the complex role of digital media in contemporary society.

  • MUSC 278Z: Survey of Jazz Styles / Noah Baerman

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA MUSC
    Grading Mode:
    Student Option
    Schedule:
     Asynchronous, with student option to attend synchronous online class meetings twice a week: Mondays and Thursdays, 3:30-5:10pm. These class meetings will be recorded and available to the class.
    Syllabus: Click here

    In "Survey of Jazz Styles" we will be looking to understand how jazz works. We will be exploring historical developments and chronology, but it is not a history class. We will be delving into some structural issues, but it is not a music theory class - in fact, a background in music theory is not at all necessary for this course. In essence, we will be developing an awareness and tools that will allow us to understand and evaluate what we are hearing when we listen to live or recorded jazz. We will explore how and why the musicians do what they do, and the larger context into which a performance fits.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - ENGL 296Z: Techniques of Fiction / Brando Skyhorse

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
    Graded
    Schedule: Fully-asynchronous

    Fully Asynchronous - Individual meetings/office hours as needed

    Every great writer starts out as a great reader. In order to become a great reader, you must learn the proper questions to ask when evaluating a piece of writing. Using a wide sampling of short stories and basic fiction theory, this class will teach you how to get inside a writer's mind by dissecting what we have on the page. Students will participate in daily free writes, learn how to spot the tools and tricks of great writers, and how to apply those to their own writing. We'll also discuss story structure, how to "show" instead of "tell" by writing scenes, and how to edit and revise your work once you've finished a draft of it.