Winter Session 2021 Courses

Winter Session 2021 courses will be entirely remote/online due to the pandemic, with both synchronous and asynchronous options.

Students taking Wesleyan courses for credit online in a U.S. state outside of Connecticut may use this form to submit questions or concerns.

The Winter Session 2021 schedule is as follows:
Short Session: January 4 - 18; reading day January 19, finals day January 20.
Long Session: January 4 - 29; reading Day February 1, finals day February 2.

Winter enrollments are processed on a first-come, first-served basis. The request, payment and any approvals must be fully complete before enrollments are processed.

Students are encouraged to contact faculty directly with any questions about courses.

COURSE INFORMATION SUBJECT TO CHANGE

Students may enroll in 1 Short Session course, OR they may enroll in 1 or 2 Long Session courses. Courses will meet for all 40 class hours. Courses may only be taken for credit; auditors are not permitted in Winter Session courses.

Please note: Students should expect some readings and assignments to be due during the winter break, prior to beginning Winter Session.

PART 1: Short Session

  • CCIV221Z Whose Rights? Democracy, Personhood and the Law, Ancient & Modern // Eirene Visvardi

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA CLAS
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm, 1:30pm-3:30pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    Legal texts--law codes, decrees, and edicts, juristic discussions, law court cases--help us understand the history of legal thinking and strategy, and the construction of constitutional frameworks. Yet Greek legal sources offer something more than a history: Although these texts in many ways served as the foundation for European legal systems, they nonetheless offer radically different ways of thinking about concepts such as private and public, rights versus responsibilities, and the possibility of freedom and happiness--some more progressive than our own. In an era when many of our institutions and conventions appear open to challenge, the classical sources offer alternate legal and social ways of thinking, and new tools for understanding our own time.

    This course will provide an introduction to legal thinking in classical antiquity and, drawing from a range of sources, will speak to the intersection of constitutional frameworks with political theory. Through laws, narratives, and case studies, we will examine Greek approaches to thorny legal issues that are still contested today: the right to trial, women’s rights, democratic (dis)enfranchisement, torture and confession, imprisonment, capital punishment, immigration and citizenship, and the “equity” of law, among others. The ancient sources will be brought into dialogue with current cases and debates. We will also explore the construction of constitutional frameworks and see how these are deployed alongside religious beliefs and collective mores to cultivate “civic thinking”.

    On the last day of the course we will hold a mock trial.  

    [For Classics/CCIV Major requirements, this course falls under the History/Social Justice track]
     
    Required Books (hard copies preferred)
    *Please use these particular translations

    1. C. Carey (2011) Trials from Classical Athens. 2nd Edition. (Routledge Sourcebooks for the Ancient World) Routledge

    2. P. Burian and A. Shapiro (2011) The Complete Aeschylus: Volume I: The Oresteia (Greek Tragedy in New Translations). Oxford University Press

    3. Brickhouse, T.C. and Smith, N.D. (2001) The Trial and Execution of Socrates. Oxford Univ. Press

  • FULLY ENROLLED - COMP112Z Introduction to Programming // James Lipton
    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM MATH
    Grading Mode:
    TBA
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm, 1:00pm-4:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    The course will provide an introduction to modern, high-level programming language including a discussion of input/output, basic control structures, types, functions, and classes. The lectures will also discuss a variety of algorithms as well as program design issues. The second meeting time for each section is a computer lab.
  • E&ES271Z Mapping the Pandemic // Kim Diver

    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM E&ES
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 9:30am-11:00am, 12:00pm-2:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the global community’s daily relationship with space and movement, both at a hyperlocal scale of social distancing to a global scale of disease spread. Spatiotemporal visualizations in the form of maps and apps have allowed us to watch the worldwide spread of COVID-19 and keep tabs on local case counts in our own spaces. Furthermore, individuals use geoenabled apps to alert businesses that they are nearing the merchandise pick-up destination (e.g. curbside pickup), to find COVID-19 testing locations, to find uncrowded outdoor spaces (e.g. parks and hiking trails), and so on. Delivery services (e.g. Amazon) use navigation networks to efficiently deliver goods to homes and businesses. Public health organizations map the number of available medical resources (e.g. open beds, respirators) per hospital and region. Researchers create spatial maps and models of indoor air flow of pathogen-laden air, social justice issues related to the pandemic (e.g. racial and policing tensions in the US), changes in air quality due to decreased automobile commuting during lock-down, and so on. Understanding spatiotemporal patterns in population growth, migration, urbanization, globalization of travel and trade, food production (especially industrial livestock production), widening socioeconomic disparity, habitat encroachment, and climate change also allow researchers to examine the emergence of global infectious disease pathogens. In short, geographic information systems (GIS) provide citizens, researchers, health care providers, and policy makers with a powerful analytical framework for visualization, data exploration, spatial pattern recognition, response planning, and decision making within our life in the time of COVID-19.

    This course is designed to develop spatial thinking and visualization skills relevant to COVID-19. Students will look at (and critically evaluate) existing maps and apps related to the current pandemic, create their own maps and apps, and critically evaluate their classmates’ maps and apps. Class meetings will consist of case study lectures/discussions, instructor-led skill-building workshops, studio work sessions, and presentation/critique sessions. Spatial data collection, management, analysis, and visualization will occur within a cloud-based GIS (ArcGIS Online). Readings prior to the first class will establish a baseline for student comprehension of the breadth of applied geospatial thinking in today's research arena. The course is aimed at students with limited or no prior GIS experience.

  • EDST221Z Decolonizing Education // Demetrius Colvin

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS EDST
    Grading Mode:
     CR/U
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 5:10pm-8:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    Who determines what is true and worth knowing? How has the construction of knowledge and academic traditions from across the globe been impacted by such phenomena as (post)modernity, (neo)colonialism, and (neo)liberalism? Why do any of the questions above matter to your own personal history, beliefs, and identity? This course will provide a space for students to critically examine the history and development of the discourses that have shaped their educational experiences and their understanding of the purpose of education. The first half of the course will focus on texts and assignments that interrogate how some of our modern epistemological discourses were formed and maintained through the lens of postcolonial studies and critical educational studies.

    The second half of the course will center on ways people have worked within these dominant modes of thought to resist hegemonic modern discourses that privilege logical positivism, quantification, objectivism, and Western European histories and ideologies above all else. This coursework will involve reflection essays on class lectures and readings due before the class starts on Jan. 4th. The synchronous coursework will include intergroup dialogue and group activities that will encourage students to examine their own connection to the theoretical concepts presented in the lectures and homework assignments. The culminating project/final will be a scholarly personal narrative wherein students will synthesize both what they learned about themselves and the content that was presented during the course.

  • ENGL214Z Reading and Writing Memoir // Jeanne Bonner
    Gen Ed Area Dept:  HA ENGL
    Grading Mode: 
    Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Thursday, 10:00am-12:00pm, 2:00pm-4:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    Memoir is the art of shaping one’s personal history. What makes this genre possible is the willingness to mine our most important human experiences in a way that’s astonishingly unique but also universal. And do not fear: Everyone’s life contains the seeds of memoir.

    Yet, to be clear, memoir differs from autobiography; it’s not an orderly retelling of facts, nor is it an orderly retelling of all the facts. It is the necessary privileging of one set of events or one slice of an event over others. Memoir is a beguiling combination of disclosure and concealment – or at the very least, omission. Indeed, Annie Dillard tells us that unlike autobiography, memoir asks us what to put in as well as what to leave out. Also, where do you begin? Where is the beginning?

    While the genre of memoir is joyfully accessible to most readers, that does not mean writing memoir is easy. We will explore how to select the most compelling details and scenes. Good memoir is true but it can read like fiction. Voice and tone are critical, and they help us answer this question: How do we enable readers to feel and experience the personal histories we want to pour into a work of memoir?

    In this fast-paced, immersive course, we will master the art of close reading, and we will read as writers do. We will examine works of memoir with an eye toward identifying how the authors mastered the art of storytelling and sketching of the characters (yes there are characters, even though memoir is nonfiction). How did the writer translate lived experience into a piece of writing that is engaging while also personal?

    But most importantly, we will practice writing memoir, compiling several examples into portfolios that will be shared with the class. This course will be part literature course, part writing workshop. We will use a combination of paired portfolio exchange and all-hands workshopping.

    Since this is a Winter session course, students will be immersed in reading and writing memoir, and can expect to write every day in class as well as often after class. We will use prompts in class to generate new writing, and through the major class assignments, we will generate two examples of memoir for our portfolio. We will also explore how we develop strategies to write regularly and keep writing regularly.

    Last but not least, we will also talk at length about revision, one of our most prized writing tools.
  • ENGL285Z Fantasy and Speculation // Magdalena ZapÄ™dowska
    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, Jan 4-15, 12:30pm-2:30pm (Session 1) and 4:00pm-5:00pm plus 1 asynchronous hour scheduled by student (Session 2)
    Syllabus: Click here

    In this class we will read fantasy written by multi-ethnic authors in a variety of genres, mostly in the United States in the long nineteenth century (1770-1920). Our readings include texts that feature supernatural beings and events in imaginary settings – but also texts that take on well-known myths and legends, create fictional characters to participate in historical events, fold time and space to place historical characters in the midst of fictional events, or gesture toward radically different futures. This broad understanding of fantasy will challenge us to redefine its constitutive features. The choice of readings draws on the work of scholars committed to the recovery of little-known texts, especially by African American authors.

    Our study will be guided by three interrelated goals: (1) to complicate our assumptions about who wrote in the speculative mode; (2) to examine the relationship between the speculative mode and the authors’ aesthetic choices, (3) to interrogate the political meanings of fantasy and speculation, asking how authors harness them to dislodge narratives of progress, claim imaginative freedom, improvise better worlds, or perpetuate oppression.

    The readings, arranged in loose chronological order, include fiction, poetry, and nonfiction prose by African American authors from Phillis Wheatley to Saidiya Hartman, an excerpt from the Hawaiian creation myth Kumulipo in the English translation by Hawai'i’s last queen, and texts by canonical Anglo-American writers like Emily Dickinson and Edgar Allan Poe. The primary texts are accompanied by some scholarly articles to enrich our thinking. Assignments include a team project that proposes a taxonomy of the speculative mode.
  • HIST261Z Enlightenment and Science // Cecilia Miller

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS HIST
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm, 2:00pm-4:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    This course will be a study of how we, as a society, have obtained our views on science. The class will concentrate on the positive and negative ways that twenty-first-century science and technology have been impacted by the Enlightenment. In general terms, the long-eighteenth-century European Enlightenment is taken to be the marker of the modern age—when modern science emerged. The time has now come for a reconsideration of the complexity of science and the scientific method during the Enlightenment as a means of comprehending its direct impact on the modern age in which we are living today. This class will focus overall on the strengths and weaknesses that modern science, technology, and thus society have inherited from the Enlightenment. 

    This is not wholly a story of science and technology in the West, but a World History story. This class will highlight test cases and ethical choices—to give two modern examples, decisions about resource allocation, that of fossil fuels and vaccines—that we are facing today. These choices are not made simply on scientific, logical lines but also according to the preferences of society. In order to understand our current situation, we must inform ourselves about how we arrived at this situation. Two centuries ago, without government or private sources of funding for science, the emphasis on immediate outcomes in science became common. Practitioners of science (the term “scientist” was not used until the nineteenth century) often had to be showmen to attract attention in order to get funding. Likewise, by the twenty-first century, it is now almost impossible for scientists to get grants for pure research; winning applications have to stress immediate public outcomes in order to get funded. This effectively puts a stopper into the very source of new scientific ideas—pure science—and of virtually all new scientific break throughs, and this is a world-wide trend in the sciences.

    In this class, we will examine crucial examples of the key scientific subjects that emerged during the Enlightenment, and social and political responses to these same scientific discoveries, from both the Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment, which stressed religion over science. We will read responses from non-practitioners of science at the time—educated people trying to make sense of emerging modern science in the midst of politically and economic troubled times. There was, in the eighteenth century, no safety net—such as unemployment benefits—for those who wanted to practice science in a time that there were no jobs in science. There was certainly no safety net for the rest of society either. The parallels to our own time are self-evident: political polarization, closely linked to radically different views toward science, in the midst of epidemics and widespread financial distress.

    Emerging modern science in the long eighteenth century was relatively open to new types of people, not just new ideas. During the Enlightenment, science and technology were being advanced by artisans in addition to well-connected practitioners of science. Talented young men from less privileged backgrounds were, for the first time, slowly able to gain access to the major scientific circles during the Enlightenment. A surprising number of women (in a time when women had virtually no legal rights apart from their male relatives) were also active in scientific circles. Such accomplished women were rare during the Enlightenment but they should not be ignored. Margaret Cavendish, Émilie du Châtelet, and Caroline Herschel are prime examples of women practitioners of mathematics, physics, and astronomy respectively. Women were also the organizers of the intellectual salons in Paris and the political salons in London. In all these cases, even the political salons, science was discussed as a general topic of discussion, not just a subject for specialists. And those knowledgeable in the sciences were expected to make their work accessible to non-specialists. Later, however, the nineteenth-century professionalization of, and specialization in the sciences led to mixed results. It certainly allowed for a substantial increase in the scale of modern scientific work. Nevertheless, it also led to a less open attitude toward those not trained as scientists in the newly-established manner. Alas, it also resulted in the end of the belief that educated people outside of the sciences should know about it in order to be proper citizens. Overall, this class will address areas of commonality and difference between Enlightenment science and technology and modern science and technology, including lingering problems, as well as possible solutions suggested from past writings and experiences. 

    There will be many distinctive aspects of this class. One will be the intensive textual analysis of primary documents in class. Another will be the active participation of several guest speakers. There will also be a virtual visit to Special Collections, Olin Library, Wesleyan University.

  • HIST395Z/REES 344Z/RELI393Z: "If there is no God, then is everything permitted?" Moral Life in a Secular World // Victoria Smolkin

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS HIST
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm, 1:00pm-2:00pm (synchronous) & additional assignments (asynchronous).
    Syllabus: Click here

    In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, Dmitri Karamazov famously poses the question of what would happen to mankind “without God and immortal life,” asking whether this means that “all things are permitted.” Made famous by Dostoevsky, the question of whether we can be moral without God has always haunted secularism, and has consistently been the most vocal criticism of atheism and unbelief. From Papal condemnations of secularism and “godless Communism,” to the contemporary consensus that belief in God is evidence of moral goodness and its absence a sign of a broken ethical barometer, the assumption has been that transcendental authority is all that stands between us and moral abyss. When the atrocities committed by “totalitarian” regimes are cited as evidence of this, it is only the most radical articulation of a broader narrative of secular modernity. Whether we can be good without God, then, is a question that has long haunted human society. In the contemporary world, it has become central to how we judge political, social, and individual action. Our focus will be on historical cases where religion and the secular were explicitly engaged by the state. We will examine individual and collective articulations of morality in three prominent models of secularism: American “civil religion,” French laïcité, and Communist “official atheism.” What constitutes the moral foundation of a world without God? Can religion’s moral and spiritual function be performed by a different kind of belief system?

  • FULLY ENROLLED - QAC201Z/GOVT201Z/PSYC280Z/NS&B280Z Applied Data Analysis // Valerie Nazzaro
    Gen Ed Area Dept: NSM QAC, SBS QAC
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm, 2:00pm-4:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. You will develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the skills required to complete a project of your own design. These skills will prepare you to work in many different research labs across the University that collect empirical data. It is also an opportunity to fulfill an important requirement in several different majors.
  • RELI230Z Cinematic Encounters: Muslims and/in/of the West // Peter Gottschalk
    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS RELI
    Grading Mode:
     Graded
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 10:00am-1:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    Please note: students will be required to view all films prior to the first day of class, and to submit pre-session assignments. Examining contemporary films by and about Britons, Indians, Pakistanis, Afghans, and Black & White Americans offers the opportunity to challenge the simplistic binaries of West vs. Islam upon which popular representations often rely. We will pay attention to the aesthetic choices made by directors and screenwriters as they depict themes of Muslim emigration, European imperialism and colonialism, religion and secularism, terrorism and state violence, representations of gender, and issues of multiple belonging. Particular analytic emphasis will be given to the concept of nationalism. Films that may be included are “The Outpost,” "The Kingdom of God," "The Battle of Algiers," "Lagaan," "Zero Dark Thirty," "The Beauty Shop of Kabul," "Restrepo," "Khuda ke Liye," "My Name Is Khan," "Malcolm X," and "AmericanEast".
  • THEA385Z The Working Actor // Maria-Christina Oliveras
    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA THEA
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday: A mix of asynchronous and synchronous class time, to be determined based on student enrollment/time zones.
    Syllabus: Click here

    This course is geared toward those students venturing into the earliest stages of an acting career. Emphasis will be placed on auditioning for film, television, and theater, finding opportunities in NYC, LA, and regional markets, cultivating a network, self-tapes, clarifying a mission statement, and logistics of the business (headshots, agents, casting directors, unions). The course will include modules that address the industry shift to on-line, including voice-over, radio plays, ZOOM-specific plays, and auditioning via ZOOM/self-tapes.

PART 2: Long Session

Long Session - Option A: Asynchronous Courses
  • ECON127Z/CSPL127Z Introduction to Financial Accounting // Martin Gosman

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS ECON
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Asynchronous with individual online office hours as needed.
    Prerequisties: ECON 101 or ECON 110
    Syllabus: Click here

    Asynchronous with individual online office hours as needed.

    In this course, no prior accounting knowledge is required or assumed. Students learn how accountants define assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses and where those items appear in firms' balance sheets and income statements. The purposes and limitations of these two financial statements as well as the statement of cash flows are considered. Students gain an understanding of the accounting choices allowed to firms for reporting to stockholders and creditors and learn how the use of different accounting methods for similar economic events creates challenges for analysts. Instances of questionable financial reporting and strategies that can aid in their discovery are addressed. Later assignments focus on ratio analysis of actual firms' financial statements, including techniques to identify firms in financial trouble.

  • FGSS211Z Sexual Politics // Lauren Rosewarne

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS FGSS
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Fully-asynchronous lectures with additional student group work.
    Syllabus: Click here

    Fully-asynchronous lectures; students will set up weekly live online discussions at times that best suit their location.

    This subject introduces ideas developed in feminist theory about the social and political construction of areas of experience relating to the body, gender and sexuality. Issues analysed in the subject include transsexualism, reproduction, pornography, sex work, sexual violence and sexual orientation. Students who complete this subject should be able to understand the ways in which issues connected with the body and sexuality are socially and politically constructed, understand the ways in which the construction of masculinity and femininity affects the learning and regulation of such areas of experience, and apply a variety of feminist approaches to the analysis of these issues.

  • HIST299Z Bertolt Brecht's America // Courtney Fullilove

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS HIST
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Fully-asynchronous lectures
    Syllabus: Click here

    Fully-asynchronous lectures with additional student group work. The course also requires individually scheduled meetings with the instructor.

    The German playwright and poet Bertolt Brecht was a passionate student and critic of American society, before and after his exile in the United States during World War II. This course engages Bertolt Brecht’s writings about the United States as a device for studying the history of American economy and society. Brecht’s studies of Karl Marx’s writings informed his interpretation of the plight of the industrial working class, while his vision of epic theater made American history into a morality play on a grand scale. In exile following the rise of the Third Reich, Brecht produced mordant observations on his life in California, which was then home to a flowering of Marxist cultural criticism. He eventually returned to East Berlin in 1947, after being interrogated by the the House Un-American Activities Committee, Senator Joseph McCarthy’s vehicle of Cold War anti-communism.

    Brecht’s politics, and his incessant imagination of the virtues and vices of social and economic life, render him a charismatic guide to nineteenth and twentieth century American history. His personal history in exile renders him a witness and an object of American political culture. A selection of Brecht’s plays, poetry, and film collaborations, including The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (1927/1930), St. Joan of the  Stockyards (1929/31), and “Hollywood Elegies” (1942), provide a scaffold for our readings on the history of westward expansion, the gold rush, urbanization, industrialization, industrial food systems, democracy, and anti-communism.

    All Brecht’s works are provided in English translation. Students may choose to read/view
    German language editions/productions instead. Our selection of materials relies heavily on
    Patty Lee Parmalee, Brecht's America. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1981 (pre-
    WWII) and James K. Lyon’s Bertolt Brecht in America. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1980 (post-WWII).

Long Session - Option: B: Morning Courses
  • CSPL262Z Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship // Makaela Kingsley
    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS CSPL
    Grading Mode:
     CR/U
    Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 9:00am-12:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    In this project-based class, students will learn strategies for understanding social and environmental problems, and they will design interventions to create impact. Each student will select a topic to work on individually or as part of a team. Course content will include root cause analysis, ecosystem mapping, theory of change, human-centered design, business models, metrics and evaluation, philanthropy, pitching, and more. Some students will develop real or hypothetical entrepreneurial projects and ventures while others will design pathways to impact as activists, community organizers, strategists, coalition builders, artists, researchers, or other roles. Guest speakers will be invited in to share their own work as social entrepreneurs and changemakers.
  • DANC357Z/THEA357Z Space and Materiality: Performing Place // Marcela Oteiza

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA THEA
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday 10:00am-12:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    Scenography explores and shapes the material world in and through the performative event. In site-specific performances, it transforms place and time to create an alternative reality in which the materiality of the artistic design and the performer's body intervene in the architecture of a place and the spectator's reception of meaning. In this course, we will study site interventions through the lens of street performance, immersive theater, and the theatrical apparatus to build a theoretical and direct understanding of the material potential and limitations of the four key elements involved in the scenographic project -- artistic design, the actor's body, local architecture, and time. 

    This course is divided into three units: (1) site-specific; (2) street performance; and (3) immersive theater. Each unit includes scholarly readings, assignments in performance and scenography, and specific showings at the festival. There will be two written responses for the course (5-to-7-page papers) on two of the works experienced at the festival that demonstrate the student's cumulative grasp of site specificity, scenography, and materiality. There will also be a final media journal showing.

  • FULLY ENROLLED - GOVT155Z International Politics // Giulio Gallarotti (with fully-asynchronous option)
    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Asynchronous, with student option to attend synchronous class meetings Monday through Friday, 10:00am-11:40am
    Syllabus: Click here

    Asynchronous, with student option to attend synchronous online class meetings Monday through Friday, 10:00am-11:40am. These class meetings will be recorded and available to the class.

    This introduction to international politics applies various theories of state behavior to selected historical cases. Topics include the balance of power, change in international systems, the causes of war and peace, and the role of international law, institutions, and morality in the relations among nations.
  • MUSC278Z Survey of Jazz Styles // Noah Baerman (with fully-asynchronous option)

    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA MUSC
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Asynchronous, with student option to attend synchronous class meetings Mondays and Thursdays, 10:00am-11:40am
    Syllabus: Click here

    Asynchronous, with student option to attend synchronous online class meetings twice a week: Mondays and Thursdays, 10:00-11:40am. These class meetings will be recorded and available to the class.

    This course is a study of how jazz works, developing the awareness and tools that allow us to understand and evaluate what we are hearing when we listen to live or recorded jazz--how and why the musicians do what they do and the larger context into which a performance fits. We explore historical developments and chronology, the structures that govern jazz improvisation and other performance practices and the instrument roles and sub-styles that typically make up the music. Though there will be ample relevant information for musicians, a background in music theory or performance is not at all necessary for this course.

Long Session - Option C: Afternoon Courses
  • FULLY ENROLLED - ARST190Z/IDEA190Z Digital Foundations // Christopher Chenier
    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ART
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 2:00pm-4:00pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    Please note: Some readings and assignments will be due during winter break.

    This foundations-style course engages core topics in the production and critique of digital and electronic art. Project development, creative problem solving, and experimentation are taught through a series of assignments combining the software and tools most frequently employed in the digital studio. Students will learn to use Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator in conjunction with cameras, inkjet printers, scanners, and a laser cutter. While developing a range of procedural skills such as compositing, animation, and projection, students will search for new ways to employ digital tools across the visual arts.
  • ENGL238Z Jane Austen and Her World // Stephanie Weiner
    Gen Ed Area Dept: HA ENGL
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Monday through Friday, 1:00pm-3:15pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    In this course we will read—and re-read—three novels by Jane Austen. Our first reading will track the development of Austen’s unique approach to the realist novel. Our re-reading will investigate how that unique approach participated in contemporaneous debates about art, personhood, and politics. Austen was an active participant in these debates—a sharp, subtle, and principled writer who tended to explore competing arguments and assumptions rather than render explicit judgments. She weighed in on aesthetic controversies involving beauty and the picturesque, the appropriate language for literature, the ethics of readers’ identification with characters, and the truth claims inherent in realism. She considered philosophical questions about how individuals come to know the world and themselves, and the value and danger of a complex inner life of emotion and imagination. She examined the competing claims her contemporaries made for the primacy of the individual, the family, and the community, and for local rootedness and cosmopolitan independence. This course fulfills the English Department’s Literary History II requirement.
  • GOVT311Z US Foreign Policy // Douglas Foyle

    Gen Ed Area Dept: SBS GOVT
    Grading Mode:
     Student Option
    Schedule: Tuesday through Friday, 1:00pm-3:30pm
    Syllabus: Click here

    This course provides a survey of the content and formulation of American foreign policy with an emphasis on the period after World War II. It evaluates the sources of American foreign policy including the international system, societal factors, government processes, and individual decision makers. The course begins with a consideration of major trends in U.S. foreign policy after World War II. With a historical base established, the focus turns to the major institutions and actors in American foreign policy. The course concludes with an examination of the challenges and opportunities that face current U.S. decision makers. A significant component of the course is the intensive discussion of specific foreign policy decisions.

Mango Languages

Wesleyan students may enroll in certain 0.25-credit, on-line language course using Mango Language over Winter Break (at no cost). The language has to be one that is not available via normal classroom instruction; currently, the options include Danish, Farsi, Romanian, and Norwegian. For more information visit https://www.wesleyan.edu/cgs/also/independent-language.html and click on the “Mango Language for a 1/4 Credit” drop-down, or contact Emmanuel Paris-Bouvret, Director of Language Resources and Technology, at eparis@wesleyan.edu.

Visit the Winter Session Course Archive to see a list of courses that have previously been offered.